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Expansion of Alsea Bay Marina and Boat Ramp finally underway!

Expanding docks at Alsea Bay Marina – Roy Lowe photos

The long awaited expansion of the Alsea Bay Marina and Boat Ramp in Waldport is finally underway.  The long awaited project got off to a slow start in order to accommodate last season’s salmon runs and crabbing off of “A Dock.”  But as you can see in the photographs provided by local photographer Roy Lowe, the disassembling of the old facilities is well underway.

The old docks were pretty well beat-up and weathered necessitating the $2.7 Million dollar investment by the Port of Alsea to take marina facilities to a whole new level.  The good news is that the old single boat ramp will be converted into a brand new double boat ramp to speed up boat launches – especially during the Spring, Summer and Fall for fishermen heading out the jaws as well as upstream.

The upgraded marina will have a combination of head-in slips and side ties.  The new marina will extend another 40 feet to add 20 more boat parking spaces.  They’ll add a new floating dock dedicated to crabbing and kayaking,  and they’ll expand the number of parking spaces to accommodate the boating public.

The Port of Alsea indicated that everything should be installed and ready for use sometime in April.

Coronavirus Vaccines and the Economy – Duane J. Silbernagel, CFP

 

 

Duane Silbernagel, CFP
Financial Planner

Coronavirus Vaccines and the Economy
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel, CFP®

  1. As the United States sees a rise in cases of COVID-19 across the nation, news of two promising vaccines out of hundreds being tested has offered a ray of hope for a fatigued world. A positive reaction to these vaccines affects every aspect of human life, including the financial world. On Monday, November 16th, The Dow Jones Industrial Average rose 450 points on the news of a second effective vaccine, hitting a record high.
  2. Markets are not merely reacting to the positive news, but what a vaccine might mean for the economy. Investors are likely picturing people returning to something resembling their old lives.  Stocks related to travel, such as airlines and cruise holidays, have seen an uptick.  The properties of the vaccine itself might influence the markets – one of the vaccines spotlighted requires deep refrigeration, leading to a boost in trading for companies offering that service.

3. While the hope the vaccine inspires feels reassuring, it’s crucial to maintain the long view, just as the markets are. Investors may now see life after COVID-19 on the horizon, but we aren’t there yet. Vaccines must be approved for use, distributed, and widely adopted before the full benefit can be realized. That will take time.

4. In the meantime, we welcome your questions on the economic impact of one or more successful vaccines and how it might affect your overall financial strategy.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website: www.duane.wrfa.com

Thank you for your interest.

Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com.  This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. The article was written by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. (Copyright 2020) and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (11/20)

1. The Associated Press, November 16, 2020
2. CNBC.com, November 16, 2020
3. Barrons.com, November 10, 2020
4. Seattle Times, November 16, 2020

Federal Government cutting extended unemployment benefits…

Today the Oregon Employment Department announced a reduction in extended benefits as a result of Oregon’s falling unemployment rate. Following a federal determination, Extended Benefits (EB) will be reduced from up to 20 weeks of benefits to up to 13 weeks, beginning Dec. 13, 2020.

“We know the benefit extension has been a critical safety net for many Oregonians, and this reduction in available benefits will be painful,” said David Gerstenfeld, acting director of the Oregon Employment Department. “We are calling on our federal elected leaders to help Oregonians and pass legislation that will allow us to quickly provide benefits to those still facing hardships. We stand ready to implement any new or continued benefit programs as quickly as possible, so that Oregonians are able to make ends meet while the pandemic continues to spread.”

Extended Benefits (EB) is a program that extends regular Unemployment Insurance (UI) benefits when a state is at high unemployment. The average unemployment rate is reviewed at the federal level over a three-month period to determine if the state goes into this extension. If the average unemployment rate is below 8% but above 6.5%, then up to 13 weeks of additional benefits are available under EB. If the average unemployment rate is above 8%, the number of additional weeks of benefits increases to 20 through High Extended Benefits (HEB).

Because of Oregon’s high unemployment rate during the pandemic, the Department began paying up to 20 weeks of HEB on the week ending July 11, 2020. Claimants receiving benefits under HEB will continue receiving those benefits through the week ending Dec. 12. Beginning Dec. 13, claimants will see a change to the number of extended benefits they have remaining.

Some examples of what will happen after Dec. 12:

  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 10th week on EB, you will receive benefits for that week and will have 3 weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you can continue claiming and receiving EB, for a total of 13 weeks.
  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 13th week of EB, you will receive benefits for that week but will have zero weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you will not receive any more weeks of EB.
  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 15th week of EB, you will receive benefits for that week but will have zero weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you will not receive any more weeks of EB.
  • If the week ending Dec. 12 is your 1st week of EB, you will receive benefits for that week and will have 12 weeks of EB remaining. Starting Dec. 13, you can continue claiming and receiving EB, for a total of 13 weeks.

Some Oregonians who have already received 13 weeks of EB may be able to receive Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits for the few weeks remaining before that program expires on Dec. 26, 2020. To qualify for PUA, claimants’ unemployment must fit one of the CARES Act-listed criteria for being COVID-19 impacted. Oregonians can apply for PUA through the Employment Department’s Online Claims System.

The Department will send claimants a letter and an email informing them that their EB benefit amount has been reduced. Claimants can also check to see how many weeks of EB they have been paid by viewing their claim status in the Online Claims System.

More information about Extended Benefits and High Extended Benefits can be found on these FAQs.

Covid took its time – Our battle with the virus is far from over….

First Lincoln County death since August from COVID-19

November 25, 2020

Lincoln County Public Health has documented its first COVID-19 related death since August 15th.  He was a 27-year-old man who tested positive on November 18th after dying on the day before at his residence.   He had underlying conditions.

Public Health also announced 12 new cases of COVID-19 today.  The cases are a mix of sporadic spread and case clusters.

Lincoln County has many resources that can help residents or visitors of any background and preferred language. If you experience a medical emergency call 911 immediately. For less urgent care, contact the Lincoln Community Health Center, Samaritan Health Services or your medical provider. Contact information is below.

Lincoln County Emergency Call Center (leave a message for a call back) 541-265-0621  or E-mail LincolnCoCallCenter@co.lincoln.or.us

Does COVID-19 have you stressed or anxious? Contact CORE (Community Outreach & Recovery Education) at 541-265-0403 or E-mail the Lincoln County Call Center.

TESTING OPTIONS:

Samaritan Health Services

  • For a telehealth visit via video or phone, call your primary care provider. Find out more at samhealth.org/Telehealth.
  • Samaritan patients can visit samhealth.org/MyChart to set up a MyChart account.
  • Those who are not currently Samaritan patients may call 541-768-7080 to set up an account.
  • Patients without a primary care provider or who are unable to access MyChart can call 855-543-2780.

Lincoln Community Health Center

  • Call 541-265-4947 to schedule an appointment with a provider.

And the Corona goes on…

Coronavirus Update nameplate

Nov. 24, 2020

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Oregon sets another grim record with 21 COVID-19 deaths reported in a single day

We are saddened to report that the 21 COVID-19 deaths that health officials are reporting today set a one-day record.

“We feel pain and sorrow for our neighbors who’ve lost their lives to COVID-19 and the families they leave behind,” said Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen. “And each death we record is a reminder that COVID-19 is a life-threatening virus that’s easy to catch, a warning that more Oregonians will die if we don’t contain it and a call to action to stop its spread.”

Keep doing your part to help reduce the spread of the virus: Wear a mask, keep six feet between you and other people when you’re in public, and wash your hands often. In addition, all Oregon counties are currently subject to a two-week freeze, which recommends that you limit the size of your social gatherings to six people or fewer and gather with no more than one other household at a time.

You can reduce your risk of getting or spread COVID-19 by keeping your social gatherings: small, brief, outdoors, physically distant. #MyORHealth horizontal rule

Do you need health insurance?

Many Oregonians who are uninsured may qualify for the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) or for help paying for coverage through the Marketplace. Oregon’s Marketplaceopen enrollment runs from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15 and is the only time of year many people can buy private health insurance.

In 2020, more than seven in 10 Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got financial help for monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. Due to job losses during the pandemic, we estimate thousands of Oregonians may be newly eligible for help paying for health insurance. Want help? Experts are available to offer free assistance remotely and in person by appointment following COVID-19 safety protocols. Find local help on OregonHealthCare.gov.

Remember, you must apply and enroll by Dec. 15 to get coverage for 2021 through the Marketplace. You can apply for the Oregon Health Plan at OHP.Oregon.gov at any time. To find out what coverage and savings are available to you, visit OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Oregon reports 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed 21 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 847, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. The total number of Oregonians hospitalized with COVID-19 also increased, along with the number of people with the virus who are in intensive care.

OHA also reported 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 67,333.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (20), Clackamas (106), Clatsop (7), Columbia (7), Coos (4), Crook (3), Curry (7), Deschutes (44), Douglas (19), Grant (4), Harney (2), Hood River (6), Jackson (56), Jefferson (12), Josephine (11), Klamath (16), Lake (9), Lane (57), Lincoln (23), Linn (21), Malheur (17), Marion (113), Morrow (5), Multnomah (150), Polk (30), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (34), Union (4), Wasco (9), Washington (183), and Yamhill (24).

Oregon’s 827th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 19 at Tuality Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 828th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov. 1 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 829th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 18 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 830th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Nov. 15 in his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 831st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 15 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 832nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 10 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 833rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Wallowa County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 9 at Wallowa Memorial Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 834th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 22 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 835th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 17. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 836th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 11 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 837th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 20 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 838th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 18 at Portland Veteran’s Administration Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 839th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 21 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 840th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 21 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 841st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 23. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 842nd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 7 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 843rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on June 24 and died on Nov. 4 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 844th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 20 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 845th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 14 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 846th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 24 and died on Oct. 25 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 847th COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old man in Marion County who died on Nov. 12 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise: The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 474, 18 more than yesterday. There are 113 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, four more than yesterday. More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

More Coronavirus Update

Coronavirus Update nameplate

Nov. 24, 2020

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Oregon sets another grim record with 21 COVID-19 deaths reported in a single day

We are saddened to report that the 21 COVID-19 deaths that health officials are reporting today set a one-day record.

“We feel pain and sorrow for our neighbors who’ve lost their lives to COVID-19 and the families they leave behind,” said Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen. “And each death we record is a reminder that COVID-19 is a life-threatening virus that’s easy to catch, a warning that more Oregonians will die if we don’t contain it and a call to action to stop its spread.”

Keep doing your part to help reduce the spread of the virus: Wear a mask, keep six feet between you and other people when you’re in public, and wash your hands often. In addition, all Oregon counties are currently subject to a two-week freeze, which recommends that you limit the size of your social gatherings to six people or fewer and gather with no more than one other household at a time.

You can reduce your risk of getting or spread COVID-19 by keeping your social gatherings: small, brief, outdoors, physically distant. #MyORHealth horizontal rule

Do you need health insurance?

Many Oregonians who are uninsured may qualify for the Oregon Health Plan (OHP) or for help paying for coverage through the Marketplace. Oregon’s Marketplaceopen enrollment runs from Nov. 1 through Dec. 15 and is the only time of year many people can buy private health insurance.

In 2020, more than seven in 10 Oregonians who chose plans through HealthCare.gov got financial help for monthly premiums and out-of-pocket costs. Due to job losses during the pandemic, we estimate thousands of Oregonians may be newly eligible for help paying for health insurance. Want help? Experts are available to offer free assistance remotely and in person by appointment following COVID-19 safety protocols. Find local help on OregonHealthCare.gov.

Remember, you must apply and enroll by Dec. 15 to get coverage for 2021 through the Marketplace. You can apply for the Oregon Health Plan at OHP.Oregon.gov at any time. To find out what coverage and savings are available to you, visit OregonHealthCare.gov/WindowShop.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Oregon reports 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed 21 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 847, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. The total number of Oregonians hospitalized with COVID-19 also increased, along with the number of people with the virus who are in intensive care.

OHA also reported 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 67,333.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (20), Clackamas (106), Clatsop (7), Columbia (7), Coos (4), Crook (3), Curry (7), Deschutes (44), Douglas (19), Grant (4), Harney (2), Hood River (6), Jackson (56), Jefferson (12), Josephine (11), Klamath (16), Lake (9), Lane (57), Lincoln (23), Linn (21), Malheur (17), Marion (113), Morrow (5), Multnomah (150), Polk (30), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (34), Union (4), Wasco (9), Washington (183), and Yamhill (24).

Oregon’s 827th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 19 at Tuality Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 828th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov. 1 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 829th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 18 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 830th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Nov. 15 in his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 831st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 15 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 832nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 10 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 833rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Wallowa County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 9 at Wallowa Memorial Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 834th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 22 at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 835th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 17. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 836th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 11 in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 837th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 20 at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 838th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 18 at Portland Veteran’s Administration Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 839th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 21 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 840th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 21 at Rogue Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 841st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 23. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 842nd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 7 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 843rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on June 24 and died on Nov. 4 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 844th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 20 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 845th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 14 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 846th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 24 and died on Oct. 25 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 847th COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old man in Marion County who died on Nov. 12 at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise: The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 474, 18 more than yesterday. There are 113 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, four more than yesterday. More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Lincoln County Covid-19 rate just went up…Don’t make Thanksgiving your “Last Supper!”

Covid-19 Virus

Oregon reports 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 21 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore.COVID-19 has claimed 21 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 847, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. The total number of Oregonians hospitalized with COVID-19 also increased, along with the number of people with the virus who are in intensive cares.

The 21 deaths that health officials are reporting today sets a one-day record. OHA Director Patrick Allen said, “We feel pain and sorrow for our neighbors who’ve lost their lives to COVID-19 and the families they leave behind. And each death we record is a reminder that COVID-19 is a life-threatening virus that’s easy to catch, a warning that more Oregonians will die if we don’t contain it and a call to action to stop its spread.”

People can do their part to help reduce the spread of the virus: wear a mask, keep six feet between you and other people when you’re in public and wash hands often. In addition, all Oregon counties are currently subject to a two-week freeze, which recommends that you limit the size of your social gatherings to six people or fewer, and gather with no more than one other household at a time.

OHA reported 1,011 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 67,333.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (7), Benton (20), Clackamas (106), Clatsop (7), Columbia (7), Coos (4), Crook (3), Curry (7), Deschutes (44), Douglas (19), Grant (4), Harney (2), Hood River (6), Jackson (56), Jefferson (12), Josephine (11), Klamath (16), Lake (9), Lane (57), Lincoln (23), Linn (21), Malheur (17), Marion (113), Morrow (5), Multnomah (150), Polk (30), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (34), Union (4), Wasco (9), Washington (183), and Yamhill (24).

Oregon’s 827th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 19, at Tuality Community Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 828th COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 22 and died on Nov. 1, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 829th COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 18, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 830th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Multnomah County who died on Nov. 15, in his residence. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 831st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 15, in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 832nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Nov. 9 and died on Nov. 10, at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 833rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Wallowa County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 9, at Wallowa Memorial Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 834th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 22, at Mercy Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 835th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 10 and died on Nov. 17. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 836th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 3 and died on Nov. 11, in her residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 837th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Douglas County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died on Nov. 20, at Mercy Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 838th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 18, at Portland Veteran’s Administration Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 839th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Nov. 6 and died on Nov. 21, at Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 840th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Jackson County who tested positive on Oct. 26 and died on Nov. 21, at Rogue Valley Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 841st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old man in Union County who tested positive on Nov. 11 and died on Nov. 23. Location of death and presence of underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 842nd COVID-19 death is a 94-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Oct. 29 and died on Nov. 7, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 843rd COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on June 24 and died on Nov. 4, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 844th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 15 and died on Nov. 20, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 845th COVID-19 death is a 58-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 4 and died on Nov. 14, in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 846th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Oct. 24 and died on Oct. 25, at Portland Adventist Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 847th COVID-19 death is a 33-year-old man in Marion County who died on Nov. 12, at Kaiser Westside Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.


COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 474, 18 more than yesterday.

There are 113 COVID-19 patients in Intensive Care Unit (ICU) beds, 4 more than yesterday.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.


The job’s still not done…but they’re getting there…

As EPA’s work winds down, some response crews remain to handle final cleanups

(Salem, OR – November 24, 2020)   As EPA pauses to retool its wildfire household hazardous waste recovery operations for the Thanksgiving holiday, agency officials  are reflecting on the results achieved by cleanup teams over the past 90 days in Oregon. After the holiday, EPA will continue reducing their “footprint” in the state, with many crews already departing to return to their normal schedules, teams and families.

Since mobilizing on September 24 by FEMA “Mission Assignment,” 17 EPA field recovery teams, working 12-hour days, seven days a week, have retrieved and removed household hazardous waste from over 2300 fire-ravaged parcels in eight Oregon counties.  In addition, EPA teams stabilized and consolidated ash and debris from more than 230 parcels along Oregon waterways – including five miles of the Bear Creek riparian area in Jackson County – protecting water quality from toxic runoff.  In all, EPA mobilized over 250 responders, both virtually and in the field, from all over the country to support response operations.

According to EPA Incident Commander, Randy Nattis, the Agency has been proud to help Oregon recover from the devastating fall wildfires, crediting local support and guidance as critical to EPA’s success. 

“Make no mistake, I couldn’t be prouder of our work and what  our teams have accomplished,” said EPA’s Nattis. “But we are standing on the shoulders of the County Public Works directors, DEQ On-Scene Coordinators, FEMA disaster officials, our support contractors and countless Oregon responders. Projects of this size, scope and scale demand ultimate teamwork. And we couldn’t have asked for better, more resilient partners than Oregonians.”

With Step 2 of the Oregon state-managed cleanup getting underway, Step 2 cleanup crews are expected to begin clearing properties throughout wildfire impacted areas in mid-December, removing hazard trees, ash and debris.  EPA’s presence will remain at a more compact profile, with several smaller mobile crews remaining to respond to any additional properties that still need attention. EPA crews will also back up ODOT’s contractors as they start removing heavy debris, cars and appliances and find hidden household hazardous waste, cylinders, ammunition or other hazardous materials.

For more information about EPA’s Step 1 work, please visit our 2020 Fire Recovery Story Map . For more information about Oregon’s Step 2 work please visit the 2020 Oregon Wildfire Recovery website or call the Wildfire Debris Cleanup Hotline at 503-934-1700.

Traffic Crash in Newport

11:15am  A sideswipe accident on Highway 101 at Northwest 25th in Newport.  One probable injury.  One southbound lane is blocked.

Vehicle crash into a house at 313 NW 16th, Newport

9:30am – Lady driver crashed into a house at 313 NW 16th, small bungalow type home.   Driver suffered a head injury.  May have been a ricochet crash with another vehicle before careening off into the home.   Vehicle into home is said to be a Newport City Vehicle.

Call for photos:  News@NewsLincolnCounty.com

Samaritan Hospitals: You MUST “mask up” if you want to come inside!!

Samaritan updates requirements for patient and visitor face coverings

(Corvallis, Ore. – Nov. 23, 2020) To assure the highest standards of safety for patients, visitors, clinicians and staff, and to limit the spread of coronavirus, Samaritan Health Services will implement updates to face mask requirements starting Tuesday, Nov. 24. Patients, visitors, and all staff in any Samaritan facility will now be required to wear properly fitting face masks, rather than simply face coverings.

Patients and visitors may use disposable face masks or cloth masks with multiple layers, and the masks must fit snugly around the nose, over the mouth and under the chin. Bandannas, gaiters, face shields and face masks with valves are not permitted.

For hospital inpatients, face masks may only be removed if:
The patient is actively eating or drinking and is physically distant – at least six feet – from anyone who does not live in the patient’s household.
The patient is alone in a private room.
The patient is physically distant – at least six feet – from others in a shared room.
The care being provided to the patient cannot be done with a mask on.

For outpatients, such as in Samaritan’s clinics and laboratories, face masks must be worn the entire time they are in the building and may only be removed if the care being provided cannot be done with a mask on.

Exemptions to these masking requirements include children younger than 2 years old, patients whose clinician has determined that they cannot wear a mask due to shortness of breath, and patients who are unconscious, incapacitated or otherwise unable to remove the mask without assistance.

“The updated requirements are in alignment with the best information we have about the virus that causes COVID-19 and how it spreads,” said Adam Brady, MD, of Samaritan Infectious Disease. “We want to ensure we are doing everything we can to limit the spread of COVID-19 and provide safe health care.”

For more information about Samaritan Health Services response to COVID-19, visit samhealth.org/Coronavirus.

Covid-19 Update

Covid-19 Virus

November 23, 2020

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 826, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,174 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 bringing the state total to 66,333.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (2), Benton (10), Clackamas (116), Clatsop (2), Columbia (18), Coos (7), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (44), Douglas (18), Grant (1), Harney (1), Hood River (6), Jackson (80), Jefferson (8), Josephine (11), Lake (3), Lane (71), Lincoln (3), Linn (15), Malheur (10), Marion (120), Morrow (7), Multnomah (254), Polk (25), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (56), Union (26), Wasco (7), Washington (225), Wheeler (1), and Yamhill (17).

NOTE: On Saturday and Sunday we noted those days as having second and third consecutive record high cases. However, it was third and fourth consecutive record high cases. OHA regrets the error.

Oregon’s 821st COVID-19 death is a 57-year-old man in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 13 and died Nov. 21 at Portland VA Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 822nd COVID-19 death is a 40-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Oct. 11 and died Nov. 20 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 823rd COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died Nov. 19 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 824th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 19. Place of death and underlying conditions are being confirmed.

Oregon’s 825th COVID-19 death is a 96-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Nov. 17 and died Nov. 22 at Salem Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 826th COVID-19 death is a 60-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Nov. 16 and died Nov. 16 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

COVID-19 hospitalizations continue to rise

The number of hospitalized COVID-19 patients across Oregon increased to 456, which is 44 more than Friday.

There are 109 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, 18 more than Friday.

Virus positivity rates are down….for now. But gotta keep your guard up. The virus is on the rise!

Covid-19 Virus

Lincoln County Public Health reports today that there were 6 positive tests out of 1140 or a positivity rate of 0.5% during the free testing events last week. The testing sites were in Waldport, South Beach, Lincoln City, and Toledo.

“We are grateful to have had this opportunity for our county, and clearly the community wanted to take advantage of this” said Florence Pourtal, Deputy Director of Public Health. “These results are aligned with the trends we have seen in Lincoln County over the past few months. These results demonstrate that the LC communities have sustained the proper steps preventing the spread of COVID-19

“It is encouraging to see that the exponential spread of COVID-19 that Oregon has been experiencing for the past few weeks has not hit Lincoln County yet,” added Florence. “However, this does not mean we can stop what we’re doing. We all need the community to keep protecting others with wearing a mask and physically distancing, staying home when sick, and washing your hands. Now is also the time to get your flu shot to protect our healthcare system should we see a local surge in COVID-19 cases this winter.”

The tests were conducted the same week Oregon announced a two-week “freeze”. As of Wednesday, November 18, there is an order in place limiting gatherings to 6 people from 2 households and closing in-person dining, among other limitations. Lincoln County Public Health urges Lincoln County residents to follow

the orders and make plans now to adjust or cancel your traditional holiday gatherings.

Public Health thanks the partners who made this event a success – Medical Teams International, Oregon Health Authority, Lincoln County Emergency Management and local SERT teams. The tests were self-administered Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests that were processed by Willamette Valley Toxicology.

Corona Virus Update…

Coronavirus Update nameplate

November 23, 2020

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Stay home for the Thanksgiving holiday this year

For many people, Thanksgiving is a time for gathering with friends and family, watching football and eating delicious food. This year, with COVID-19 cases increasing rapidly both in Oregon and throughout the country, it’s important that people stay home and avoid travel for the holiday. Avoiding travel can reduce the risk of transmitting COVID-19 as well as the risk of bringing the virus back to Oregon.

Governor Brown issued a travel advisory on Nov. 13 that asks people who travel out of state for non-essential reasons, like tourism or recreation, or anyone who travels to Oregon from out of state for non-essential reasons, to quarantine for 14 days after returning home and to limit their interactions to people they live with.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have also advised against Thanksgiving travel. The CDC website has a list of questions to consider before you travel as well as tips to follow if you decide you must travel.

Thanksgiving safety cardLast week Governor Kate Brown launched a statewide public awareness campaign with Portland-based ad agency Wieden+Kennedy to inform Oregonians about the urgent importance of limiting social gatherings — especially during the holiday season — and continuing to wear face coverings even when visiting family and friends in small gatherings. Learn more in the news release.

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

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