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Housing Stability Council Meeting Thursday February 25 – 2pm to 3:30pm

February 19, 2021

The next Housing Stability Council meeting will be on Thursday, February 25, 2021 from 2:00 PM to 3:30 PM. The meeting will be held electronically due to the current COVID-19 health crisis. Please register for access link.

Webinar Meeting Only

Public register in advance for this webinar:

https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_A-ulU3VUQ0mQOX3LY4-rqw

AGENDA:
2:00 Meeting Called to Order – Roll Call
2:05 Review Council Member Feedback
2:30 Council Discussion
3:15 Wrap-Up & Next Steps
3:30 Adjourn

Contact Info:
Kate Gonsalves
Senior Communications & Public Relations Coordinator
Pronouns: she/her/hers
Oregon Housing & Community Services
C: 503 931-5087
Kate.Gonsalves@Oregon.gov

Newport Parks & Recreation Advisory Committee – Tuesday, February 23 – 9am City Hall

PARKS AND RECREATION ADVISORY COMMITTEE AGENDA Tuesday, February 23, 2021 – 9:00 AM
Virtual – Council Chambers, Newport City Hall, 169 SW Coast Highway

publiccomment@newportoregon.gov.

The agenda may be amended during the meeting to add or delete items, change the order of agenda items, or discuss any other business deemed necessary at the time of the meeting.

  1. CALL TO ORDER/ROLL CALL
  2. ADDITIONS/DELETIONS TO AGENDA
  3. APPROVAL OF MINUTES
  1. 3.A  December 15, 2020 Minutes Minutes 12-15-20 DRAFT.pdf
  2. 3.B  January 26, 2021 Minutes Minutes 1-26-21 DRAFT.pdf (more…)

Corona Virus Update 2-19-21

Coronavirus Update nameplate

Feb. 19, 2021

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

State leaders provide update on vaccination progress

Governor Kate Brown was joined by Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen, State Epidemiologist Dr. Dean Sidelinger and other partners today to give an update on Oregon’s vaccination rollout.

“Oregonians continue to make smart choices, and the numbers speak for themselves,” said Governor Brown. “As of yesterday, Oregon had the third lowest infection rate in the nation. And while this is great news, we must remain vigilant in the face of challenges ahead with the new variants. We advise Oregonians to continue to follow safety measures and choose your activities wisely so that you are minimizing risk as best you can.”

Here are some more highlights:

Oregon is making progress on vaccination:

  • Even though winter storms affected vaccine shipments and clinics, Oregon averaged more than 14,000 vaccinations per day (14,645) over the past week.
  • Oregon remains on schedule to open vaccinations to people 70 and older on Monday, Feb. 22.
  • OHA is committed to interrupting the widening racial, ethnic and other inequities we see in vaccinations and throughout the pandemic.

“At OHA, we’re working to build bridges with communities our health care system has failed to serve well, improve access to vaccines and other health care, eliminate health inequity and enable more people to live a healthier life,” said Director Allen. “Working with Federally Qualified Health Centers is at the core of our effort to eliminate COVID-19 health inequities.”

Director Allen pointed out that Oregon’s vaccination program is not on track regarding racial and ethnic inequity in responding to the pandemic or in vaccination rates. Latinx communities in Oregon have seen the most pronounced inequities when compared to whites.

  • People who identify as white represent 75% of people in Oregon however, while they only comprise about half (48%) of COVID-19 cases, they account for 74% of vaccinations.
  • People who identify as Latino or Hispanic represent 13% of people in Oregon but comprise 26% of COVID-19 cases – twice their proportion of the population.
  • Only 5% of the vaccinations administered to date have been administered to the Latinx community.
  • People who identify as Black or African American are 2% of the state population and they represent 2.4% of COVID-19 cases. They represent under 2% of COVID-19 vaccinations.
  • Native Americans comprise close to 2% of people in Oregon and account for close to 2% of COVID-19 cases and 2% of COVID-19 vaccinations.

You can watch the news conference here. More information on vaccines is available at covidvaccine.oregon.gov and at vacunacovid.oregon.gov. (more…)

This week’s vaccine supply has not shipped to Newport. Next week’s supply possibly delayed….

Vaccinations stalled


Newport, Ore – This morning, Lincoln County Public Health learned that the Moderna vaccines still have not shipped from their production facility in Tennessee. The Oregon Health Authority is in close contact with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) regarding the vaccine shipments. Currently, it is unknown if the vaccines will ship this weekend or if the delay will continue into next week.

Lincoln County was expecting 1,200 vaccines this week (500 prime and 700 second doses). In addition, we were expecting 1,300 vaccines for next week (900 prime and 400 second doses). This delay caused five clinics this week to be rescheduled to next week. The software systems used to schedule and send reminders had technical issues and reminder notices were confusing or incorrect. Over the last two days, staff have worked to send correct notices to over 1,500 people, including calling all of those who had emails that bounced back.

Lincoln County was a leader in the state in getting vaccines to people as quickly as possible after receiving weekly allotments. This ambitious effort by our community partners was working, but also had some unforeseen repercussions. One week our allotment was reduced to zero vaccines so other counties could catch up, and then this week we had to postpone clinics because we did not have any extra vaccine on hand.

As a result of these events, the multi-agency coordinating (MAC) group has made the decision to refrain from scheduling new clinics until we have vaccines on site. The county will keep some vaccine in reserve each week so we can avoid rescheduling clinics if there are delays in delivery again.

If the shipment of 1,200 vaccines arrives by Monday morning, we will have the following clinics next week. All these clinics were filled from our waitlist last week and are currently closed to new registrations.

Tuesday February 23rd, Lincoln County Commons (Fairgrounds) 1st dose clinic – (rescheduled from 2/16/21)

Tuesday February 23rd, St. Clair (Taft) Fire Station 1st dose clinic – (rescheduled from 2/18/21)

Wednesday February 24th, St. Clair (Taft) Fire Station 1st dose clinic – (rescheduled from 2/16/21)

Wednesday February 24th Lincoln County Commons (Fairgrounds) 2nd dose clinic – (rescheduled from 2/18/21)

Thursday, February 25th Lincoln County Commons (Fairgrounds) 2nd dose clinic – (rescheduled from 2/19/21)

Senior Living or Nursing Homes: Lakeview, Sea Aire, and Oceanview 2nd dose vaccines will be administered at the facility.

There is no concern with the effectiveness of these vaccines after a delay. They have been kept in cold storage at the production facility, and Moderna does not require ultra-cold storage. Also, a week delay in the second dose of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine will not reduce its effectiveness. The CDC guidance states the 2nd dose should be given at least 28 days after the first dose, and there is no maximum interval between the first and second dose.

While we wait for vaccines to arrive, the MAC group and community partners are working on setting up additional sites for vaccine. The Siletz Community Health Clinic has agreed to help vaccinate people in the Siletz and Logsden area who are on the county waitlist. The county is finalizing agreements for clinics in Waldport and Toledo.

Home healthcare providers will be delivering vaccine directly to housebound people on the waitlist. Public health is also reaching out to pharmacies to help deliver vaccine, should we get additional shipments from the federal distribution program.

If you have any questions or need help signing up for a vaccine, Lincoln County has a call center to help. This call center is staffed by local people who are happy to assist anyone with questions

A neighborly gesture of generosity to our community…invites others to participate

In a gesture of lifting up some of our pandemic victims, a lady living in Lincoln Beach is calling for others like herself to share what financial help they can offer to Lincoln County neighbors who are up against the wall.  Her offer is below:

I received a stimulus deposit and am financially comfortable. Instead of putting the money into savings or giving it to my children, I am being responsible. I am using my $600 stimulus to support our community.

COVID has devastated small businesses and wrecked havoc on our local nonprofits. This is a time where each of us can step up and contribute to the well being of our community. I am devastated that we have lost so many family owned businesses. I take advantage of my favorite restaurants that offer take out, but recognize how many other restaurants and businesses need financial support. 
This is a time where it is important to look inside ourselves and think about what makes Lincoln County a special place to live. My money is on the nonprofit whose mission is to introduce our community to the arts. The Lincoln City Cultural Center exposes us to new and different ways of expressing ourselves. It also introduces us to think differently and encourages us to explore and seek adventure.

The Lincoln City Cultural Center transcends the boundaries of Lincoln City. Its offerings are open ended and serve all segments of Lincoln County. And they work hard to make Lincoln County a destination, a boon for local businesses. 
I encourage my cohorts to look at their stimulus in terms of supporting what we value about living in Lincoln County. The Lincoln County Cultural Center is my favored benefactor, but you may have your own. We must support what makes Lincoln County a special place to live and learn. After all, the intent of the stimulus is to help ourselves and community get back on track.
Suzan Sachdeva
Lincoln Beach
suzansach@gmail.com

Late night crash damages a house on East Devils Lake Road in Lincoln City

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputies were dispatched to a traffic crash in the 5000 block of NE East Devils Lake Rd, Otis. A vehicle had left the road and struck a house. Members of the Lincoln City Police Department, North Lincoln Fire/Rescue and Pacific West Ambulance responded to the crash.  It was reported that the driver of the vehicle, later identified as Andrew Ainslie, 30, of Lincoln City, had fled the scene on foot.  Police Officers were able to locate Ainslie and detain him near the crash. Residents of the home were not injured. Ainslie’s vehicle was later towed from the location.

Ainslie was transported to Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital by Pacific West Ambulance. Deputy Rose determined that Ainslie was under the influence of a controlled substance while operating his vehicle.  Ainslie did not suffer any injuries from the crash. Deputy Rose issued Mr. Ainslie criminal citations for Criminal Mischief in the First Degree, Reckless Driving, Failure to Perform Duties of a Driver (Property Damage) and Driving Under the Influence of Intoxicants.

The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like to thank members of the Lincoln City Police Department, North Lincoln Fire/Rescue, Pacific West Ambulance and Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital for their assistance.

TOLEDO ART COMMITTEE ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS FOR PHANTOM GALLERIES!!

The Toledo ART (the Arts Revitalization of Toledo) initiative is now seeking submissions from local and regional artists who are interested in displaying their works in the new “Phantom Galleries” that will be installed on Toledo’s Main Street. Submissions are open until March 8, 2021 and the application can be found online at: tinyurl.com/ToledoARTApplication.

Phantom Galleries are small, temporary art galleries created in vacant storefronts to allow visitors to enjoy the works of local and regional artists in a COVID-safe environment. The galleries will not only enliven Toledo’s Main Street but will also showcase available street-level storefronts that are ripe for new business development.

“The Phantom Gallery project is a great synergy between Toledo’s creative ecosystem and downtown economic development,” said Paul Schuytema, the Executive Director of the Economic Development Alliance of Lincoln County. “It’s proven that the arts drive dollars into a community, and Toledo’s Main Street is a perfect showcase for some amazing artists.”

The galleries will feature works of local and regional artists. Each gallery will have information about the artist, their displayed work and how it can be purchased as well as the commercial space and its amenities. QR codes will allow visitors to scan and then visit the artist’s page on ARTToledo.com, a website under development by students in the Digital Media CTE class at Toledo High School. The gallery backdrops were made possible by a generous donation from the Visual Arts Center of Newport.

“This project has energized an already enthusiastic class and has given the students the opportunity to work on a real-world project that will help their community,” said Rachael Wallace, Digital media instructor. “We could not have asked for a better project to partner on.”

Artists are encouraged to apply to display their work, which will be selected by the Toledo ART committee. The galleries will officially launch this Spring with several events to follow in the Spring and the Summer. The initial round of artists will be on display for 90 days in the galleries.

Future Toledo ART projects include art events, Main Street beautification work and a new mural program. If you would like to learn how to get involved in Toledo ART, please contact Rachael Maddock-Hughes at rachael@sequoiaconsulting.org.

“This project is the beginning of a vision that Toledo artist Michael Gibbons and I shared with each other back in 2008,” said Toledo’s Mayor Rod Cross. “I am excited for the future of where ART can go in our town. Toledo truly is where Art and Industry meet!”

The Arts Revitalization of Toledo (ART) is a project launched by the City of Toledo and supported by local businesses, non-profits, the County and other stakeholders who are dedicated to revitalizing downtown to serve the needs of current residents and to breathe new life into Toledo’s Main Street.

ART Committee members include: the Timbers Restaurant and Lounge; Crow’s Nest Gallery; Port of Toledo; the Economic Development Alliance of Lincoln County; Yaquina Pacific Railroad Historical Society; Yaquina River Museum of Art; Oregon Coast Visitors Association, local artists; Toledo High School; Toledo Chamber of Commerce, Bank of the West, members of the community, and more.

You can follow ART Toledo online at:

  • Web: ARTToledo.com
  • Facebook: facebook.com/ArtToledoOR
  • Instagram: instagram.com/art_toledoor/

Lincoln County vaccines reduced and delayed next week.

Lincoln County vaccines reduced and delayed next week

Newport – Late yesterday, Lincoln County Public Health learned from the Oregon Health Authority that the anticipated 1,200 vaccines (500 prime and 700 second doses) for this week still have not shipped from the distribution hub in Kentucky and Tennessee due to weather. This development is now affecting the 2nd dose clinics we had planned this week.

Thanks to the efforts of Samaritan Health Services and the second doses from last week shipment, we were able to procure enough vaccine for Wednesday’s 2nd dose clinics at the Lincoln County Fairgrounds in Newport and at the St. Clair (Taft) Fire station in Lincoln City. But we do not have enough for the other clinics.

Here is the status for the clinics this week:

  • Tuesday 2/16, Lincoln County Commons (Fairgrounds) 1st dose clinic – RESCHEDULED to Tuesday 2/23 8:45am – 2:15pm. Emails or phone calls were sent Friday with the new appointment times.
  • Tuesday 2/16, St. Clair (Taft) Fire Station 1st dose clinic – RESCHEDULED to Wednesday, February 24th. Emails or phone calls were sent Friday with the new appointment times.
  • Wednesday 2/17, St. Clair (Taft) Fire Station 2nd dose clinic – STILL SCHEDULED

  • Wednesday 2/17, Lincoln County Commons (Fairgrounds) 2nd dose clinic – STILL SCHEDULED
  • Thursday 2/18, St. Clair (Taft) Fire Station 1st dose clinic – RESCHEDULED to Tuesday, February 23rd. Emails or phone calls will be made today (Wednesday) with the new appointment times.
  • Thursday 2/18, Lincoln County Commons (Fairgrounds) 2nd dose clinic – RESCHEDULED to Wednesday February 24th, same appointment times. Emails or phone calls will be made today (Wednesday) to notify people of the change to their appointment.
  • Friday 2/19, Lincoln County Commons (Fairgrounds) 2nd dose clinic – RESCHEDULED to Thursday, February 25th, same appointment times. Emails or phone calls will be made today (Wednesday) to notify people of the change to their appointment.If you have an appointment scheduled on Thursday or Friday of this week, watch for an email from “Lincoln County Call Center” at LincolnCoCallCenter@co.lincoln.or.us. Emails sent from our scheduling system today did not work properly, so we are re- sending individual emails to appointments, and making phone calls. Be sure to also check your spam or junk email folders.

    If you do not get an email or phone call, but you know you were scheduled for one of the clinics we had to postpone, you can call the Lincoln County Call Center at 541-265-0621 or email us at LincolnCoCallCenter@co.lincoln.or.us. Please wait until later Thursday before calling to give us time to get the notifications out.

Corona Virus Update

Oregon reports 473 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 5 new deaths

There are five new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,143, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA also reported 473 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 151,257.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 15,790 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 10,653 doses were administered on Feb. 16 and 5,137 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on Feb. 16.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

Oregon has now administered a cumulative total of 707,244 first and second doses of COVID-19 vaccines. To date, 922,300 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA’s dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

Severe weather is delaying COVID-19 vaccine shipments across the country. These weather-related issues may cause changes to daily number trends reported by OHA in its updates on the cumulative number of doses administered, the daily number of administered doses and the number of doses delivered to Oregon. OHA remains in regular contact with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to ensure Oregon doses are safe.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (7), Clackamas (17), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (10), Crook (2), Deschutes (50), Douglas (40), Grant (1), Harney (9), Hood River (6), Jackson (52), Jefferson (10), Josephine (13), Klamath (5), Lake (6), Lane (39), Lincoln (2), Linn (10), Malheur (15), Marion (25), Morrow (2), Multnomah (55), Polk (14), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (11), Union (8), Wallowa (2), Wasco (1), Washington (27) and Yamhill (19).

Oregon’s 2,139th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 26 and died on Feb. 14 at Asante Rogue Valley Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,140th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 15 at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,141st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on Feb. 12 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,142nd COVID-19 death is a 53-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 20 and died on Feb. 15 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,143rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Washington County who became symptomatic on Feb. 3 after contact with a confirmed case and died on Feb. 12 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Traffic Crash at 101 and South Immonen Road

8:22pm  Report of a four vehicle crash at Highway 101 and South Immonen Road, north of Gleneden Beach.  Emergency responders are enroute.  

8:27pm  Arriving Fire-Rescue personnel report four vehicles involved in the southbound lane crash.

8:28pm  Rescue personnel on scene say there are no injuries.

Covid-19 Update 2.17.21

Cases and deaths from Corona-19

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (5), Benton (7), Clackamas (17), Clatsop (2), Columbia (3), Coos (10), Crook (2), Deschutes (50), Douglas (40), Grant (1), Harney (9), Hood River (6), Jackson (52), Jefferson (10), Josephine (13), Klamath (5), Lake (6), Lane (39), Lincoln (2), Linn (10), Malheur (15), Marion (25), Morrow (2), Multnomah (55), Polk (14), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (11), Union (8), Wallowa (2), Wasco (1), Washington (27) and Yamhill (19).

Oregon’s 2,139th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Jan. 26 and died on Feb. 14 at Asante Rogue Valley Regional Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,140th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lincoln County who tested positive on Jan. 28 and died on Feb. 15 at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,141st COVID-19 death is an 89-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Jan. 15 and died on Feb. 12 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,142nd COVID-19 death is a 53-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Jan. 20 and died on Feb. 15 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,143rd COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Washington County who became symptomatic on Feb. 3 after contact with a confirmed case and died on Feb. 12 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

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