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Lower Drift Creek Restoration and Flood Reduction – Public Meeting Rescheduled

Lower Drift Creek Restoration and Flood Reduction Public Meeting Rescheduled

Lincoln City – A field visit and public meeting for the Lower Drift Creek Restoration and Flood Reduction Project has been rescheduled. The meeting will be held on October 2nd from 10 AM to Noon.

The Salmon Drift Creek Watershed Council is assisting and partnering with the MidCoast Watershed Council, US Fish and Wildlife Service, Wolf Water Resources, and the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians in the Lower Drift Creek Restoration and Flood Reduction Planning Process.

This proposed project is an effort to connect and work with private landowners and other stakeholders to identify and complete habitat projects within the lower Drift Creek area of the Siletz estuary. The efforts are focused on restoration on three tracts of land within the Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuge. The proposed project will provide spawning and rearing habitat for native salmonids whose populations have been reduced by human activity. The work will minimize impacts of flooding on adjacent public infrastructure and private residences. Interested landowners and community members can learn more about the project, get details on the field trip on October 2nd, and learn how to get involved by visiting www.salmondrift.org

Learning temporary ways to cross the bridge…

Yaquina Bay Bridge, reflecting the sunrise, Cecille Kennedy photo

Single Lane Closures – Yaquina Bay Bridge – Nights of Sept. 27 through morning of Oct. 3rd

ODOT has advised that there will be night-time single lane closures on the Yaquina Bay Bridge, starting the night of Monday, September 27th and finishing the morning of Saturday, October 3rd. Closures are anticipated to be from 7 PM until 6 AM. There will be message signs warning of construction north and south of the bridge.

Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Chris Janigo, PE, Acting City Engineer 541-574-3376 — Andrea Mather, PE, ODOT Assistant Resident Engineer, Area 4, 541-757-4156

Lakeview Senior Living celebrates National Assisted Living Week

 

Xander Sicosan, long-time staff member at Lakeview Senior Living, shows new T-shirts for National Assisted Living Week.

(Lincoln City, OR September.7, 2021) When it comes to senior living, people are still misinformed of the progress that has taken place since the days of old style nursing homes. The concept of Assisted Living started in the 1970s and by the mid-1990s four types of senior living housing models emerged – combination of housing and care support; hospitality, healthcare and housing. In June of 1992 Oregon had only 22 licensed assisted living buildings. But, this state has continued its leadership in assisted living communities listed as fourth in the top states with senior living communities in 2020.

“What we have learned along the way is to provide the right balance of support for the population within the community,” said Jennifer Whitmyer, Executive Director of Lakeview Senior Living. “Senior living now is about the rights of the residents, improving their quality of life, engaging with residents, and encouraging as much independence as possible.”

This year Oregon celebrates National Assisted Living Week during September 12-18, starting with Sunday the 12th which is Grandparents Day. To honor National Assisted Living Week, senior living communities throughout the country, will celebrate Compassion, Community, and Caring.

“Starting NALW with Grandparents Day is the perfect time to honor our elders and how much them mean to our family – both in the family unit and in the Assisted Living family which some reside,” said Whitmyer. “No one wants to feel that seniors are mistreated or face dangerous situations but we can do something about it, we consider our community to be a safe haven for seniors no matter what they have been through. Beyond the compassionate situation, we have residents who have chosen to live within our community for decades. We offer a real home for seniors who are discharged from hospitals and skilled nursing facilities who may be unsafe to live at home any longer. I like to think that we save lives and we enhance the quality of life for so many seniors.”

National Assisted Living Week offers a way to educate the public about the important role that assisted living plays in the lives of families and communities. That includes the depth and breadth of the services offered. At Lakeview Senior Living a resident can look forward to assistance with housekeeping, the laundry, cooking and kitchen work, local transportation, maintenance and yardwork, social engagement and fun. For those who may need a little more support, Lakeview staff provide personal care services , like grooming, bathing, dressing . There are nurses onsite in our building plus caregivers on duty 24 hours a day. Westmont Living, the parent company, has created a partnership with ONR (Orthopaedic Neurological Rehabilitation) at Lakeview to provide physical and occupational therapy to help keep residents strong, help with balance and fall prevention, and provide rehabilitation services after surgery or injury.

Residents at Lakeview Senior Living will have a variety of fun activities to celebrate National Assisted Living Week.
Sept. 12th- Grandparents Day and Wear Tie Dye Day
Sept. 13th- Matching Monday: Residents and staff will pair up and dress like twins
Sept. 14th- Create Compassion: residents paint rocks and hide them around Lincoln City for seekers to find
Sept. 15th- Hero Day: Residents and staff dress as their favorite superhero
Sept. 16th- Build Community: Residents will make cards and treats to deliver to local first responders
Sept. 17th- Sports Team Day: Everyone wears their favorite sports team merch
Sept. 18th- Show Care with Westmont Cares: Westmont Living, the company that owns Lakeview Senior Living, maintains an emergency fund for employees in need. Staff will participate by offering regular contributions from their paychecks or one-time donations. Wearing T-shirts provided by Westmont Living that read, We’re in this Together, staff will also take part in short videos discussing why they’ve chosen to work in a caring profession.

“After the Echo Mountain Fire several of our staff members lost their homes,” said Whitmyer. “Westmont Cares helped these staff members with immediate needs and helped ensure that these employees felt cared for.”

To learn more about National Assisted Living Week log onto ahcancal.org (American Health Care Association & National Center for Assisted Living).

To learn about Lakeview Senior Living log onto westmontliving.com/or/lincoln-city/lakeview-senior-living or call Joy at 541-921-8923.

 

 

 

Don’t go near the water …D River Beach

OHA issues advisory due to high bacteria levels at D River Beach

PORTLAND, Ore.—Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is issuing a public health advisory today for unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach in Lincoln County. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children, elderly and those with a compromised immune system should use extra caution as they are more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Levels of fecal bacteria tend to be higher in these types of water sources.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources including:

  • Stormwater runoff.
  • Sewer overflows.
  • Failing septic systems.
  • Animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

Even if there is no advisory in effect, avoid swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Ocean waters will be re-tested after an advisory is issued. Once bacteria levels are at a safe level, OHA will notify the public that the advisory is lifted.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, state officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Hoping for the best – planning for the worst…

Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake and following Tsunami region.

Although many people call the Oregon Coast a jacket-wearing paradise, there are other natural labels given to this part of the country.  And one of those labels pertain to earthquakes that are pretty strong and destructive – even more powerful than your average shaker.  The Cascadia Subduction Zone, right off the Oregon Coast, produces very powerful ground movements that can compete with just about any powerful shakers around the world.  The Cascadia Subduction Zone, runs from Alaska clear down to California.  And along that line, earthquakes are triggered every 250 to 350 years according to Oregon State University scientists.  The last big Cascadia Earthquake was in the year 1700.  You can determine with simple arithmetic we’re overdue.  So preparations are being made by Lincoln County government workers and the scientific community to get residents ready for such an event.

There are many facets to such forward-looking thinking, not the least of which is pre-planning the arrival of such an earthquake as well as post-earthquake recovery.   Lincoln County emergency services employees are already front-and-center in coming to grips with such a destructive earthquake and are formulating a highly comprehensive plan to prevent damage to buildings, streets, other infrastructure and lives. Helicopters and seaplanes are likely to be the dominant modes of immediate transportation for food and medicine, as well as transporting the injured beyond the earthquake zone. It also includes creating many civilian short-wave (amateur) radio tent-top stations to communicate with many areas of Lincoln County and well beyond – all the more important to ensure diesel, gasoline and solar powered electrical generators are well placed to keep those radio operators active while distributing critical information on lives lost, those injured, and other critical information.

Of course this all takes a mountain of preparation and coordination.  Fortunately Lincoln County is blessed with some very smart people who have been quietly, in the background, planning on how to get all this done.  And to meet this challenge there will be a number of local disaster-related government and public organizations to provide training, drills and public outreach.

         Covid-19 Delta variant

And on another front, Covid-19 was discussed among the commissioners.  They noted that the recent surge in Covid-19 hospital patients are mostly among those who, for one reason or another, refuse to be vaccinated.  They’re filling up hospital beds across the country.  The result is forcing those who would otherwise be eligible for more routine medical care to be put on waiting lists.

Savings homes, saving beach rentals, possibly saving lives

Several homes threatened by beach erosion given help by Lincoln County and the State.

Lincoln County Commissioners have teamed up with the state to ensure that a number of condos and other dwellings that overlook Gleneden and Lincoln Beaches don’t fall into the ocean. The above picture speaks for itself.  Natural ocean wave erosion of the cliffs couldn’t be more obvious.  The county commissioners Wednesday approved a plan to “shore-up” the cliffs seaward of the buildings before they begin losing pieces of their homes and vacation rentals.

As a result, the county commission voted unanimously Wednesday to work with the state to begin installing huge boulders at the base of the cliffs, along with what’s called “rip-rap” on the cliff faces to stop their slow erosion and help save the buildings above.

From the looks of things, they better get busy.

 

Stay out of the water at D River Beach!!

D River Beach health advisory issued Sept. 14

OHA issues advisory due to high bacteria levels!

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is issuing a public health advisory today for unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach in Lincoln County. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children, elderly and those with a compromised immune system should use extra caution as they are more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Levels of fecal bacteria tend to be higher in these types of water sources.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources including:

  • Stormwater runoff.
  • Sewer overflows.
  • Failing septic systems.
  • Animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

Even if there is no advisory in effect, avoid swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Ocean waters will be re-tested after an advisory is issued. Once bacteria levels are at a safe level, OHA will notify the public that the advisory is lifted.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, state officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Calling All Artists….

Recreation Center Seeks Artisans

The Newport Rec Center is looking for artists interested in exhibiting their handmade items at the annual Autumn Fest Art Show on Nov 13th. Taking place in the large gym, this event brings together artists in one place for convenient shopping. Items featured are photography, paintings, jewelry, ceramics, wood working, decorative signs, and more. “We had to cancel last year because of covid, but we are optimistic we can have a safe event this year,” says Recreation Program Specialist Jenni Remillard. “We have a mix of returning artists and a few new ones so far. We are excited to see what everyone has been up to.” Autumn Fest is a great place to get a head start on holiday shopping. A free Kid’s Corner will be available for supervised activities while adults check out the tables. The event is held from 10am to 4pm, Saturday, Nov 13th. Cost for a booth with an 8 foot table is $35, or $40 for a corner booth with two tables. Booths will be distanced and everyone is required to wear a mask. If you are interested in exhibiting, visit the special events tab here https://secure.rec1.com/OR/newport-or/catalog or contact Remillard at j.remillard@newportoregon.gov for more information.

Report from Lincoln County Health Department

Covid-19 Delta variant

Lincoln County Public Health

COVID-19 Update September 13, 2021
There were 56 new COVID-19 cases reported Friday through Sunday for a total of 292 cases so far in September.  Lincoln County has 3 new hospitalizations and no new deaths.  Five COVID-19 patients are currently in local hospitals and none are in the intensive care unit.

Public Health’s vaccination clinics will now have Free COVID-19 testing as well. You can show up just to get a test, a vaccine, or both! Today, there is a clinic at the Sea Note in Yachats from 3pm – 7pm. Tomorrow we will be at Oregon Coast Community College in South Beach from 10am – 2pm.

If you are required by your employer or by administrative rule to be fully vaccinated by October 18th, then TODAY is the last day to start the Pfizer vaccination series. Or you can get the Johnson & Johnson single dose by October 4th. It is too late to start the Moderna series and still meet the October 18th deadline.

To get information about COVID-19 testing, vaccinations and more, call 211 or visit the Lincoln County website under the section called “What’s New.”

Oregon Coast Commercial Fishermen say the fish catches have dropped…they need $$ help!

Yaquina Bay Harbor
Season catch waaay down….

Governor Brown is being urged to request, from the federal government, disaster relief for Oregon’ commercial salmon industry which has suffered yet another low catch similar to the last three years. The salmon catch of $1.5 million in 2020 produced an historic low.

Fishermen say “It’s more than just trying to preserve one of Oregon’s most important industries. It’s about the hardworking men and women of Oregon’s commercial salmon industry that has been harmed by circumstances beyond their control due to Global Warming. Our commercial salmon industry needs the assurance that the State of Oregon and the federal government are willing to lend their support during difficult times.”

The Oregon Legislative Coastal Caucus includes bipartisan representatives and senators from coastal districts from Astoria to Brookings. It’s chaired by Representative David Gomberg (D-Otis), Vice-Chair Senator Dick Anderson (R-Lincoln City), and includes Senators Betsy Johnson (D-Scappoose) and Dallas Heard (R-Roseburg) and Representatives Suzanne Weber (R-Tillamook), Boomer Wright (R-Coos Bay), and David Brock Smith (R-Port Orford).

Day by Day, Week by Month, Month by Year – Solar Energy is gradually arriving…

County Commissioners to save imperiled homes on cliffs in Gleneden Beach

Several structures threatened by beach erosion to be given some help by county commissioners.

Lincoln County Commissioners have found a way to save some cliff-imperiled multi-million dollar homes and other facilities in Gleneden Beach.  County Commissioners convinced state officials to transform a set of Oregon laws that will allow the rehabilitation of shore-eroded cliffs that the homes over-look.  Those facilities include Searidge Condominiums, Worldmark Gleneden Resort and other homes owned by several other families.

Under regular state law the homes and resorts might have been forced to be abandoned due to the sea eroding the cliffs.  But a state law was modified to strengthen the hillsides with lots of dirt fill and huge boulders to ensure that no structure falls down onto the beach below.  A formal approval of the arrangement will be part of the County Commission’s regular meeting this coming Wednesday when further details surrounding the issue will be forthcoming.

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