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Lincoln City City Council covering a lot of ground…

Lincoln City City Hall

The Lincoln City City Council acknowledged that there are big changes coming to their town, in more ways than one.  Right off the top the council hired former City Manager David Hawker to be a consultant during the transition between current City Manager Ron Chandler who is leaving for a city manager’s job in the valley and interim Lincoln City City Manager Lila Bradley.  Bradley, who is the town’s Public Works Director, will hold down the fort until the City Council can interview enough candidates to select a new permanent City Manager.  The council agreed that Lincoln City citizens should have a say in choosing the new manager for the town.  The selection process is expected to take some time.

The council also explored an approach to expanding the city’s Parks and Recreation offerings to Lincoln City natives as well as those who live outside of town.  There was a good deal of discussion about raising more money so that more parks and recreation enthusiasts could be accommodated.   There was a good deal of talk about how to raise the money to ensure that Parks and Recreation can handle the increased participation.  There was a lot of back-and-forth among the city councilors as to how the city could raise the money to accommodate an expansion of more in-city families as well as outside city families.  The council seemed agreeable that the city should find a way to make it all work.  They’ll talk more about it in May which might include creating a non-profit foundation to handle the fundraising to make it all happen.

 

All they want to do is go fishin’ for a livin’….

Idle fishing vessels tied up at Westport, WA

Merkley Leads Colleagues in Push to Support West Coast Fishermen and Seafood Processors

Collapse of industry would have detrimental impact on coastal communities, the families of millions of workers, American food supply chain

Washington, D.C. – Oregon’s U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley is  pushing the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Secretary Thomas Vilsack to make sure urgently needed federal assistance is delivered to West Coast fishermen and seafood processors, who have been hit hard by the ongoing coronavirus crisis and largely left out of USDA commodity purchasing programs.

“As you know, the ongoing public health crisis related to the COVID-19 pandemic has caused an economic disaster throughout the U.S. economy. These economic disruptions have been particularly acute for the seafood industry. Notably, more than 68% of the $102.2 billion that consumers paid for U.S. fishery products in 2017 was spent at food service establishments. The sudden and near-total loss of that market in March 2020 decimated virtually overnight the demand for U.S.-sourced seafood products, and the accompanying disruption in export markets and global supply chains has placed additional strain on domestic seafood infrastructure. Even as COVID-19 vaccines have started to be administered, significant economic impacts to the seafood sector continue.”

“During these unprecedented times, USDA’s procurement programs are critical to filling an incredibly important void – one that ensures that food production essential workers stay employed, supply chains keep operating, and America’s nutritional needs are met. We appreciate USDA’s efforts to date to expand its long-standing purchasing programs to include seafood products from various U.S. regions. However, thus far, few of the procurements have focused on the purchasing of seafood products from the West Coast.”  “We thus request that USDA include as part of its commodity purchasing programs the purchase of Pacific Northwest and West Coast seafood products that are currently being produced in large volumes, easily accessible, and easily transportable for immediate distribution to food assistance programs.”

Covid-19 Update

Oregon reports 294 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,441, the Oregon Health Authority reported.

Oregon Health Authority reported 294 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 170,850. 

Vaccinations in Oregon 

Today, OHA reported that 27,503 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 17,823 doses were administered on April 11 and 9,680 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 11. Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize. 

The 7-day running average is now 38,420 doses per day. 

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,176,173 doses of Pfizer, 1,027,792 doses of Moderna and 81,255 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 916,207 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,447,624 who have had at least one dose. 

To date,1,377,675 doses of Pfizer, 1,203,300 doses of Moderna and 203,200 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon. 

These data are preliminary and subject to change. 

OHA’s dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today. 

Cases and deaths 

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (2), Clackamas (39), Clatsop (6), Columbia (5), Coos (2), Deschutes (23), Douglas (6), Jackson (11), Jefferson (4), Josephine (13), Lane (38), Lincoln (6), Linn (15), Marion (43), Morrow (1), Multnomah (54), Polk (4), Tillamook (3), Wasco (3), Washington (3) and Yamhill (7). 

Oregon’s 2,441st COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on March 22 and died on April 7 at Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions. 

COVID-19 hospitalizations 

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 177, which is two fewer than yesterday. There are 48 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is two more than yesterday. 

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity. 

Two houses damaged in fire caused by improper disposal of smoking materials

Todd Brodeur photo

Leanna Brodeur photo

Todd Brodeur photo

News Release from Newport Fire Department:

House Fires 3300 Block of NE Avery Street caused by improper disposal of smoking materials.

At 4:07 PM on Monday, April, 12, Newport Fire Department was dispatched to a report of smoke coming from a house on 3300 block of NE Avery Street in Pacific Homes Beach Club. While in route, dispatch advised one house had flames coming out and a second house was catching fire. Upon arrival, fire units observed a single-story residence with heavy smoke and fire that was being driven by a strong wind out of the NW and a second home to the north starting to catch fire.

It was reported that everyone was out of both residences.  Fire crews established a water supply and used ground hose “monitors” and hose lines to stop the advance of the fire. Additional crews stopped the spread of the fire at the house to the north. Fire crews remained on scene for about 5 hours inspecting and extinguishing hot spots in both structures. The house initially on fire was a total loss. The adjacent structure to the north suffered fire, smoke and water damage. A third home to the south suffered minor heat damage only. No injuries were reported. 2 families were displaced and staying with relatives.

The cause of the fire was improperly discarded smoking debris. Newport Fire Department reminds you to have a working smoke detector and test it regularly, and properly discard smoking debris in a noncombustible container with a noncombustible lid.

Newport Fire Department received mutual aid response from Depoe Bay Fire District, Toledo Fire Dept., Central Oregon Coast Fire District, Seal Rock Fire District, & Siletz Valley Fire District. Lincoln County Sherriff’s Office, Central Lincoln PUD, Office of the State Fire Marshal, Newport Police Department and Pacific West Ambulance provided additional assistance. Newport Fire Department responded with 2 fire engines, 2 Rescues, 2 chief officers and 22 firefighters.

Newport Fire Department
541-265-9461

===============================================

4:08pm  House fire at 3342 NE Avery.  All occupants evacuated.  Family next door to the south is evacuating their house as well.

4:16pm  Toledo and Depoe Bay Fire Departments are enroute to help fight the blaze.

4:22pm  Fire has spread to an adjoining house.

4:24pm  Fire Chief orders “defensive” firefighting.  Likely two homes will be lost.  Firefighters are trying to save other homes that are tightly spaced – less than 15 feet apart.

4:33pm  Additional firefighters are arriving on scene.  Primary directive is to save nearby homes.  Sounds like two homes are already lost.

5:35pm  Sounds like fires are out.  Chief Rob Murphy orders mop-up including looking for hot spots.

5:45pm  Newport Fire Chief Rob Murphy says the fire crews managed to constrain the fire to two homes.  The home that caught fire first at 3342 was destroyed – the house to the south sustained some damage but was saved.  Chief Murphy said fire crews did a great job of fighting the blazes despite 20 to 25 mile an hour winds coming from the northeast.

Possible fire at 225 SE Avery, Newport

2:05pm  Smell of smoke or something burning at 225 SE Avery in Newport, the city Recreation Center.  Newport Fire-Rescue is on scene trying to track down the source of the smell.  No flames seen.

2:13pm  Fire Chief says all they’ve been able to find is a suspect electrical outlet.  No smoke.  They’re continuing to figure it out. 

An Urgent Plea From Oregon Wild

Our nation’s old forests, especially old growth forests in the Tongass National Forest and forests of the Pacific Northwest, are an incredibly important climate solution. These temperate rainforests rival tropical rainforests in terms of the amount of carbon they store per acre, but they are still being logged when they should be protected for carbon storage, wildlife habitat, and clean water.

We need the US Department of Agriculture to protect our last remaining mature and old growth forests!

When we protect our forests from logging, we both reduce greenhouse gas emissions and ensure these forests continue to store vast amounts of carbon —a win-win climate change solution! In Oregon our intact forests also offer unique and critical habitat for at risk fish and wildlife, including the marbled murrelet, salmon, and the spotted owl. Healthy forests also filter water to keep our streams, rivers and lakes clean and cold, and these same forests protect watersheds and communities from flooding and landslides.

Take action to call on the US Department of Agriculture to incorporate permanent protections for mature and old growth forests, especially the temperate rainforests of the Tongass and Pacific Northwest, as part of our nation’s strategy to address climate change.

For the wild,

Lauren Anderson
Climate Forest Policy Coordinator
Oregon Wild
 

Covid-19 report for Oregon – Updated information

Oregon reports 761 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are 0 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, the state’s death toll remains at 2,440 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 761 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 170,085.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA reported that 54,790 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 30,068 doses were administered on April 9 and 24,722 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 9.

The 7-day running average is now 37,239 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,139,331 doses of Pfizer, 1,012,176 doses of Moderna and 72,833 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA’s dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 170, which is 12 more than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 7 more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (9), Clackamas (82), Columbia (16), Coos (4), Crook (8), Curry (1), Deschutes (74), Douglas (9), Grant (3), Harney (1), Hood River (4), Jackson (57), Jefferson (2), Josephine (20), Klamath (48), Lane (67), Lincoln (4), Linn (17), Malheur (3), Marion (57), Multnomah (132), Polk (11), Tillamook (6), Umatilla (3), Union (4), Wasco (6), Washington (98), Yamhill (9).

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

800

13

Benton

2,646

18

Clackamas

14,821

201

Clatsop

866

8

Columbia

1,486

25

Coos

1,928

30

Crook

836

19

Curry

575

9

Deschutes

6,706

72

Douglas

2,985

65

Gilliam

55

1

Grant

334

4

Harney

300

6

Hood River

1,099

29

Jackson

9,625

126

Jefferson

2,036

32

Josephine

2,954

62

Klamath

3,233

57

Lake

409

7

Lane

11,173

144

Lincoln

1,261

20

Linn

3,998

61

Malheur

3,415

58

Marion

19,713

298

Morrow

1,068

15

Multnomah

34,095

564

Polk

3,343

51

Sherman

56

0

Tillamook

562

2

Umatilla

7,917

83

Union

1,402

23

Wallowa

155

5

Wasco

1,258

28

Washington

22,931

229

Wheeler

25

1

Yamhill

4,019

74

Statewide

170,085

2,440

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

Water Rescue at Yaquina Head out Lighthouse Drive

1:55pm Report of somebody in the water or in distress or both at the end of Lighthouse Drive.

2:07pm Arriving Newport Firefighters say they don’t see anyone in trouble but will continue to look around.

2:21pm  Rope Team cancelled.  Coast Guard is inbound to the scene.

2:32pm  Some rescuers are enroute to Agate Beach Wayside.

2:46pm  Wound up being a surfer in distress.  He managed to move a little bit north of Yaquina Head and made it to shore.

They’re turning on the light switches coast-to-coast…

Last week, my new book The Wealth Hoarders hit the shelves. I’m happy to report, it’s also having a lot of success in the news, with pieces in The New York Post, The Boston Globe, and The Nation, as well as coverage on CBS Moneywatch and Democracy Now.

This book matters, and this coverage matters. During this new gilded era, it’s important to keep the media and the public focused on wealth inequality.

Whether or not you’ve bought a copy of the book, I hope you’ll join me tomorrow night Monday April 12th at 7pm ET (4pm Pacific) for an online book chat, hosted by Busboys and Poets in Washington, DC:

And even if you can’t join tomorrow night, I’m doing events on Thursday 4/15 at 8pm ET, and Tuesday 4/20 at 7pm. That 4/20 event is ticketed and gets you a signed copy of the book, so make sure you register ahead of time! Learn more and register for both events.

Here are a few other ways you can help us keep wealth inequality in the spotlight:

I hope to see you there on Monday night. Thanks again for helping us spread the word about this important effort.

Chuck Collins (Click here)

Lincoln County registers NO new Covid-19 deaths – Covid Variant Surging in various areas of the U.S.

Oregon reports 499 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 0 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are no new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, the state’s death toll remains at 2,440 the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

OHA reported 499 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 170,568.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA reported Sunday that 33,381 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 22,729 doses were administered on April 10 and 10,652 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 10.

The 7-day running average is now 37,256 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,156,392 doses of Pfizer, 1,021,822 doses of Moderna and 79,507 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines.

Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize because providers have 72 hours to report doses administered and technical challenges have caused many providers to lag in their reporting. OHA has been providing technical support to vaccination sites to improve the timeliness of their data entry into the state’s ALERT Immunization Information System (IIS).

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA’s dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, and Oregon’s dashboard has been updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 179, which is nine more than yesterday. There are 46 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is the same as yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (6), Clackamas (72), Clatsop (1), Columbia (9), Coos (6), Crook (3), Deschutes (35), Douglas (6), Grant (7), Jackson (22), Jefferson (8), Josephine (9), Klamath (35), Lane (46), Lincoln (7), Linn (11), Malheur (1), Marion (47), Morrow (1), Multnomah (99), Polk (11), Tillamook (2), Union (1), Wallowa (1), Washington (43) and Yamhill (9).

County

Total Cases1

Total deaths2

Baker

801

13

Benton

2,653

18

Clackamas

14,891

201

Clatsop

867

8

Columbia

1,495

25

Coos

1,934

30

Crook

839

19

Curry

575

9

Deschutes

6,741

72

Douglas

2,993

65

Gilliam

55

1

Grant

341

4

Harney

300

6

Hood River

1,099

29

Jackson

9,647

126

Jefferson

2,043

32

Josephine

2,961

62

Klamath

3,268

57

Lake

409

7

Lane

11,219

144

Lincoln

1,268

20

Linn

4,008

61

Malheur

3,416

58

Marion

19,759

298

Morrow

1,069

15

Multnomah

34,192

564

Polk

3,354

51

Sherman

56

0

Tillamook

564

2

Umatilla

7,917

83

Union

1,403

23

Wallowa

156

5

Wasco

1,258

28

Washington

22,964

229

Wheeler

25

1

Yamhill

4,028

74

Statewide

170,568

2,440

1This includes cases confirmed by diagnostic testing and presumptive cases. Presumptive cases are those without a positive diagnostic test who present COVID-19-like symptoms and had close contact with a confirmed case. County of residence for cases may change as new information becomes available. If changes occur, we will update our counts accordingly.

Brush Fire in South Beach

10:27pm  Report of a brush and grass fire – possibly a control burn – at 4030 Southeast Harborton Street, in South Beach.  Firefighters are enroute.

It’s become cheaper to go fishing in Oregon…

Newport Fishing vessels
Frank Cavezza photo

I wanted to make sure you were aware that Representative Bill Post successfully carried HB 2067 today, a proposal to lower fees on fishing and crabbing for all Oregonians. The bill passed with bipartisan support in the House, opening up these activities to more people. Link to the bill language here: https://bit.ly/2PBhLd3

Andrew Fromm, Communications Director

House Republican Office, (503) 986-1009

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