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More research breakthroughs from OSU and Oregon Health & Science University

PORTLAND, Ore. – Researchers at Oregon State University and Oregon Health & Science University have developed a promising, first-of-its-kind messenger RNA therapy for ovarian cancer as well as cachexia, a muscle-wasting condition associated with cancer and other chronic illnesses.  The treatment is based on the same principles used in SARS-CoV-2 vaccines, and the scientists say mRNA technology, though still in its infancy in terms of therapeutic application, holds tremendous clinical potential for the management of disease. Messenger RNA carries instructions to cells regarding the manufacture of proteins.

The findings, achieved through a mouse model and published today in the journal Small, are important because ovarian cancer is a particularly deadly form of cancer, with a five-year survival rate of less than 30% if it has spread beyond the ovaries.  “Usually patients don’t learn they have ovarian cancer until it’s at an advanced stage and has reached the abdominal cavity,” said Oleh Taratula, an OSU College of Pharmacy professor based in Portland. “Treatment has been limited to surgical removal of as much of the cancer as possible, followed by chemotherapy. Most patients do initially respond to chemotherapy, but the responses generally aren’t long lasting.”

In addition to cancers of the ovaries, stomach, lungs and pancreas, cachexia is associated with many other chronic illnesses including multiple sclerosis, renal failure, cystic fibrosis, Crohn’s disease, rheumatoid arthritis and HIV.  People with cachexia will lose weight even if they eat, and not just fat but muscle mass as well. The debilitating syndrome kills as many as 30% of the cancer patients it afflicts.  The new therapy developed by Taratula, Daniel Marks of OHSU and collaborators at the two universities is based on lipid nanoparticles, or LNPs, capable of delivering mRNA that triggers the production of the follistatin protein within cancer clusters. The research is part of a five-year, $2.3 million National Institutes of Health grant that resulted from a collaboration between Taratula and Marks.

The LNPs are administered via injection into the peritoneal cavity, which contains the abdominal organs. The follistatin produced following injection works against another protein, activin A, whose elevated numbers are linked with aggressive ovarian cancer and its associated cachexia.  “By changing the characteristics of the cancer cells, mRNA treatment can lead to a range of positive effects,” Taratula said. “It prevents the buildup of ascites – abdominal fluid containing cancer cells. It also delays disease progression and induces the formation of small, solid tumors that don’t adhere to organs and thus can be more easily removed. And it combats cachexia by helping to preserve muscle mass.”

Cachexia and malnutrition have huge implications for cancer patients, he explains. Many of those patients are “in a state of nutritional bankruptcy and chronic wasting,” and that hurts their ability to benefit from treatment.  “Chemotherapy remains the frontline treatment for metastatic disease but it comes at a high cost – loss of muscle mass, depletion of fat stores, fatigue and systemic inflammation,” Marks said. “There is a clear need to find new therapies and drug combinations that improve the efficacy and tolerability of chemotherapy, and we think we’ve taken a big step in that direction.”  

The mouse model showed that mRNA therapy worked well in combination with cisplatin, the current standard of care chemotherapy treatment for ovarian cancer. Mice receiving both therapies in concert lived longer and had less muscle atrophy than those receiving just one of the treatments.

 

Bad Crash on Bear Creek Road

1:54pm  Report of a black Cadillac careening off North Bear Creek Road near Otis.  The driver lost control and went down a 20 foot embankment – injuries likely reported from the scene.

Watch Out for Power Outages – Oregon Rep. David Gomberg tells us why…

Rep. David Gomberg
Western Oregon

Dear Friends and Neighbors,

Two years ago this week, wildfires devastated Oregon and raged through northern Lincoln County, forever changing lives and landscapes.  In a cruel irony, nature chose this anniversary to duplicate fire conditions with heavy winds, high temperatures, and low humidity. But one major difference this year is that power utilities around the state were proactively turning off the electricity and that may have made all the difference.

Labor Day 2020, Susan and I were watching television when there was a loud noise on the street and the house went dark. I went outside and saw that a broken branch had severed the power line and the transformer had exploded. Sparks were dribbling off the pole and into the street. It was easy to see how, in a more remote location, this could have ignited another flareup.

Planned power outages may well become the norm for future fire seasons. Certainly a shutdown – with adequate notice – is preferable to increased fire risk. The utility companies say they are keeping in touch with affected customers via email, text, and social media, as well as through their websites.

But what exactly should you do to prepare for a power outage?

  • Make sure your contact information is current with utilities and county emergency services. That will ensure you receive warnings, notices, and updates. During outages, some utilities offer specialized support services to customers.
  • Gather critical supplies. That includes batteries, cellphone chargers, flashlights, nonperishable food, water, and extra medication. Keep those items in a safe place along with key documents. Have a go-bag ready in case you need to evacuate.
  • Check-in with neighbors and see how they’re doing.
  • When the power goes off, keep freezers and refrigerators closed. Only use generators outdoors and away from windows. Do not use a gas stove to heat or cook in your home — disconnect appliances and electronics to avoid damage from electrical surges.

 

The Oregon Small Business Development Center Network has published a Disaster Recovery Guide for Business, and free copies are available (printed or PDF) from the Oregon Coast SBDC. Prepared to serve as a practical step-by-step workbook after an event, it has proven reassuring and helpful to businesses as a planning tool.

You may have also seen my report in your post box this week detailing measures and money approved last legislative session to protect our communities from wildfires.

Grass Carp – The Sterile Variety at Devil’s Lake

Devils Lake to Introduce Grass Carp Next Spring 

Lincoln City, OR – The Devils Lake Water Improvement District (DLWID) is planning to introduce sterile grass carp into the lake. Starting in spring 2023, staff will begin restocking the lake with this fish to manage plant growth and vegetation. 

This is the latest effort in DLWID’s vegetation management to ensure a clean, healthy lake for all to enjoy. In recent months, a steady rise in weeds and vegetation has caused concern by nearby lake residents and visitors. Lake Manager Josh Brainerd explains why this is occurring and how introducing grass carp into the lake will mitigate this. 

“We are bringing the grass carp back because they are an effective way of controlling weeds and vegetation in Devils Lake, which has seen a drastic rise in the past year,” says Brainerd. “The reason for this is due to several factors which can range from changing water temperatures to having more people on the lake.” 

Grass carp are a species of fish that are commonly found in large rivers in China and Russia. These fish feed on a wide variety of aquatic weeds in natural water sources such as lakes, rivers, and streams. A well-fed grass carp can grow up to 29 inches in length and weigh over 20 pounds in less than two years. The average lifespan of a grass carp is between 10 and 20 years old. Grass carp, like all cold-blooded animals, feeding rates are determined by water temperatures. Their optimum feeding levels are typically found in water temperatures between 70- and 80-degrees Fahrenheit, making Spring and Summer the best time frames for stocking. 

They were introduced into the United States in the early 1960s as a method of vegetation control. However, it was quickly discovered that grass carp reproduce at an alarming rate. In the 1980s, researchers and commercial producers began producing sterile grass carp by manipulating the number of chromosomes in their genes. Triploid sterile grass carp started being used as a safer means of vegetation control. Oregon law requires that any usage of sterile grass carp for vegetation control be verified and documented by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife service.  

Currently, DLWID staff is working with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) to create a plan for stocking and reintroducing the grass carp into the lake. The purpose of the plan is to lay out how DLWID intends to re-stock the lake, monitor the carp, and establish optimum feeding rates to ensure proper vegetation management. Staff will go before the ODFW Commission this winter to present the plan and answer questions. Once approved by the Commission, staff can begin implementing the plan in Spring 2023

For more information, please contact DLWID via phone at 541-994-5330 or email Lake.Manager@DLWID.org. Information can also be found by visiting our website at www.DLWID.org.

Watch what you’re doing when you’re not in your own back yard…

CITY OF NEWPORT ANNOUNCES
CERTAIN CITY PROPERTIES CLOSED TO PUBLIC USE

DUE TO EXTREME FIRE DANGER EFFECTIVE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9th

The Oregon Department of Forestry has placed our region in Extreme Fire Danger beginning Friday, September 9th. The City of Newport enacted Municipal Code provisions that prohibit the public from accessing certain high-risk city properties duringmExtreme Fire Danger events.

These properties include:
Agate Beach Closure area east of the transfer station Schooner Creek Drainage
Little Creek Drainage
Big Creek Drainage
Big Creek Reservoir
Forest Park

This closure means the public is not allowed in these areas unless they have a lease or their main means of access to their property passes through the area.

This closure will remain in effect until the Oregon Department of Forestry reduces the fire danger level. The city will issue a press release announcing the change when that occurs.

The public should be aware that smoke is expected this weekend, particularly Saturday, from wildfires in other areas of the state.

Questions should be directed to Rob Murphy, Fire Chief, at 541.265.9461.

Bans on Beach Fires have been lifted

3:25pm  Oregon State Parks have ordered the removal of beach signs at Waterfront Park, possibly more.  Signs at Waterfront in northern Oregon are being removed as well as other sites up and down the coast according to state officials.

Extreme Fire Danger in our area and beyond….

CITY OF NEWPORT ANNOUNCES
CERTAIN CITY PROPERTIES CLOSED TO PUBLIC USE

DUE TO EXTREME FIRE DANGER EFFECTIVE FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 9, 2022

The Oregon Department of Forestry has placed our region in Extreme Fire Danger beginning Friday, September 9, 2022. The City of Newport enacted Municipal Code provisions that prohibit the public from accessing certain high-risk city properties during

Extreme Fire

Danger events. These properties include:
Agate Beach Closure area east of the transfer station Schooner Creek Drainage
Little Creek Drainage
Big Creek Drainage
Big Creek Reservoir
Forest Park

This closure means the public is not allowed in these areas unless they have a lease or their main means of access to their property passes through the area.

This closure will remain in effect until the Oregon Department of Forestry reduces the fire danger level. The city will issue a press release announcing the change when that occurs.

The public should be aware that smoke is expected this weekend, particularly Saturday, from wildfires in other areas of the state.

Questions should be directed to Rob Murphy, Fire Chief, at 541.265.9461.

TOTAL BURN BAN NOTIFICATION

LINCOLN COUNTY NOTIFICATION
Issue Date: September 7, 2022, at 12:00pm

Issued By: Lincoln County Fire Defense Board

Notice: Lincoln County, Complete Burn Ban Notification

Effective Date: Thursday, September 8th at 8:00pm Sunday, September 11, 2022, at 6:00am

Distribution to: Media, Lincoln Alerts, Local Public Safety/Government Officials, State Liaisons

The Lincoln County Fire Defense Board, and the nine fire protection agencies are announcing the closing of all burning effective Thursday, September 8, 2022, at 8:00pm through Sunday, September 11, 2022, at 6:00am.  The National Weather Service has issued a Fire Weather Watch in our area. Fire danger is at an extreme high; lower than normal fuel moisture levels, forecasted hotter/dryer weather, and increased wind compound the danger. Local fire agencies are continuing to assist other areas in Oregon for active fires limiting resources to respond to a wildland fire.

Oregon Department of Forestry, West District, will move Lincoln County to HIGH fire danger on Friday throughpossibly Sunday.
See ODF Regulated Public Use Info Sheet Regulated Use Restrictions live webpageThis burn ban is expected to remain in effect until Sunday, September 11, 2022, at 6:00am but may be extended depending on conditions. Firefighting resources are strained throughout the state supporting activefires in our sister counties. Lincoln County has dispatched fire fighters several times this summer in support of those efforts our most recent dispatch is returning home today.
This fire weather event is similar to the 2020 Oregon Labor Day fires. It is not expected to be as severe but is considered just as dangerous. Nonetheless, extreme precautions and safeguards during this time are necessary and of the utmost importance.  Please contact your local fire agency if you have any questions, as burning restrictions may vary based on location and jurisdiction.

Burning Restrictions
Countywide Complete Burn Ban, effective 09/08/22, 8:00pm through 9/11/22 at 6:00am
Ban applies to: Wood, charcoal, and other flame sources that cannot be turned off with a valve. Liquid
fuel stoves or cooking devices that CAN be turned off with a valve are permitted but
cannot be left unattended.

o Includes fires on the beaches and
day use park areas , commercial, private, and county
campgrounds.

Evacuation Levels – Know Your Fire Evacuation Levels:
Level 1 Be Ready

Level 2 Be Set

Level 3 Go Now

Lincoln County Active Wildfires webpage

Public Safety
Power ShutOff’s (PSPS)

A
Public Safety Power Shutoff, also called a PSPS, may occur in response to severe fire weather
conditions. Utility providers may shut off power to help prevent wildfire situations. Multiple
factors are at play when deciding to shut off power to communities the priority is community
safety. There may be some warning or no notice when power is shut off in response to wildfire
risk conditions.

More information about PSPS can be found through your power utility provider:

Central Lincoln PUD

Pacific Power
Consumers Power

Air Quality
Considerations

Air quality over the next several weeks may be affected by fires here locally and/or away from our
area; regionally or another State.

Review in advance how you can prepare your home to
minimize impact to wildfire smoke to you
and your household and
when to call 911.
Fire Districts/Departments of Lincoln County and Oregon Department of Forestry:

Central Oregon Coast Fire
and Rescue
Depoe Bay Rural Fire
Protection Dist.
Newport Fire
Dept. & Rural Fire Protection Dist.
North Lincoln Fire
& Rescue Dist. #1
Oregon Department of Forestry

Seal Rock Rural Fire
Protection Dist.
Siletz Valley Rural Fire
Protection Dist.
Toledo Fire Dept. & Rural Fire
Protection Dist.
Yachats Rural Fire
Protection Dist.

Hey you mussel harvesters….

Mussel Harvesting Closed from the Columbia River to the North Side of the Yachats River

The Oregon Department of Agriculture (ODA) and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) announce the closure of mussel harvesting from the Columbia River south to the north side of the Yachats River. Recent results indicate the marine biotoxin paralytic shellfish poison has exceeded the closure limit. 

Mussel harvesting remains open from the south side of the Yachats River to the California border. 

Razor clam harvesting remains closed on the Clatsop Beaches, between the Columbia River and Tillamook Head, for the annual ODFW razor clam conservation closure. This conservation closure allows the clams to spawn, and is not related to biotoxins. The earliest the Clatsop Beaches could re-open is October 1st. 

Razor clam harvesting remains open from Tillamook Head, south of Seaside, to the California border. 

Recreational bay clam and crab harvesting remain open along the entire Oregon coast. ODA will continue to test for shellfish toxins twice per month, as tides and weather permit. Reopening an area closed for biotoxins requires two consecutive tests with results below the closure limit. Contact ODFW for recreational license requirements, permits, rules and limits. 

For more information call ODA’s shellfish biotoxin safety hotline at (800) 448-2474, the Food Safety Division at (503) 986-4720, or visit the ODA shellfish biotoxin closures webpage by clicking the blue lettering.

Visitor restrictions at Samaritan facilities to relax


Corvallis, Oregon – An updated visitor policy for all Samaritan Health Services hospitals, outpatient departments and clinics will go into effect Monday, Sept. 12. The updated policy was developed in response to decreasing COVID-19 infections in the region.

Under the updated policy, patients at Samaritan hospitals, outpatient departments and clinics are allowed two visitors per day with the following exceptions:  Patients at the end of life may have more visitors, with the number of visitors decided in consultation with the care team.

Visitors to the Cancer Center must be ages 18 or older.  Patients with disabilities may designate at least three support people and may have one support person with them at a time. A support person is not considered a visitor.  The number of visitors in a patient room may be limited due to space or clinical needs as determined by the care team.

Additional restrictions apply for hospitalized patients who have COVID-19.

All who enter Samaritan facilities must be screened, remain masked at all times, sanitize their hands upon entry and abide by all other facility infection-prevention measures.  Visit samhealth.org/Coronavirus for more information.

Newport Parks & Recreation has a lot to say….

Movement for All at the Newport Rec Center

The Newport Recreation Center is starting a new program for those who might need some professional help and encouragement taking the first step towards a healthier life. “The First Steps program is all about learning how to put your body in motion and making space for yourself,” says Recreation Program Specialist Jenni Remillard. “Everyone deserves to be able to get out and take a walk in nature or feel comfortable working out at a gym.” The First Steps program is about just that; taking those first steps. Even thinking about going to a gym can be intimidating for a variety of factors; not knowing how to use the equipment, feeling out of place or self-conscious, not knowing what type of exercise to do or how far to push yourself, or feeling like it’s an impossible task.

“This program is for beginners or those who need to start again,” says Remillard. “Taking that first step can be the hardest one.” Remillard knows all about starting over. She battled back pain for years after a serious fall in 2005. “I found myself in a cycle of going to physical therapy, improving from the therapy exercises, graduating from therapy, not staying consistent with movements, and then ending up back in physical therapy within a year or two.”

Remillard says what finally broke the cycle was continuing movement. “I found a way to not only get inspired to keep moving, but also get over that hesitancy to get to a gym. I’m now doing this for me and giving myself permission to be in that space and do what I need to do for me.” She hasn’t been back to physical therapy since. “It’s really empowering to go from being scared of reinjuring myself to being able to do what I can do now.” Remillard wants to share that empowerment with others.

She’s been working with Brenda Luntzel, the Fitness Specialist at the Newport Recreation Center, to create a program to help people get started. “This program is not about losing weight,” says Luntzel, “it’s about providing a safe and supportive environment for people to be more physical and healthy, and help people break through their physical and emotional barriers to movement. You only have one body to get you through your long life. Take care of it, move it, feed it well, and appreciate what it can do for you. No matter what shape you are in now, your body will respond in a very positive way once you take that first step.”

There will be a First Steps open house on Sunday, Sept 25th from 2:30-5pm which will include mini intro exercise classes, informational tables, facility tours, a chance to meet with Brenda, and a panel discussion and mingle time. The open house will take place on a day when the Rec Center is closed to the general public. Pre-registration is encouraged, but not required. Contact Jenni Remillard at j.remillard@newportorgon.gov or visit the City of Newport Parks and Recreation Facebook page or their website for more information.

Jenni Remillard
Recreation Program Specialist
City of Newport
541 265 4859

Traffic Crash in Newport

5:11pm  A traffic crash at 101 and 17th Court in Newport.  One lady suffered a bit of whip-lash to her neck.  Life Support crew is enroute to the scene.

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