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Stay out of the water at D River Beach!!

D River Beach health advisory issued Sept. 14

OHA issues advisory due to high bacteria levels!

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is issuing a public health advisory today for unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters at D River Beach in Lincoln County. People should avoid direct contact with the water in this area until the advisory is lifted.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria can cause diarrhea, stomach cramps, skin rashes, upper respiratory infections, and other illnesses. Children, elderly and those with a compromised immune system should use extra caution as they are more vulnerable to illness from waterborne bacteria.

Visitors should avoid wading in nearby creeks, pools of water on the beach, or in discolored water, and stay clear of water runoff flowing into the ocean. Levels of fecal bacteria tend to be higher in these types of water sources.

Unsafe levels of fecal bacteria in ocean waters can come from both shore and inland sources including:

  • Stormwater runoff.
  • Sewer overflows.
  • Failing septic systems.
  • Animal waste from livestock, pets and wildlife.

Even if there is no advisory in effect, avoid swimming in the ocean within 48 hours after a rainstorm.

Ocean waters will be re-tested after an advisory is issued. Once bacteria levels are at a safe level, OHA will notify the public that the advisory is lifted.

While this advisory is in effect at D River Beach, state officials continue to encourage other recreational activities (flying kites, picnicking, playing on the beach, walking, etc.) on this beach because they pose no health risk even during an advisory.

For the most recent information on advisories, visit the Oregon Beach Monitoring Program website at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach or call 971-673-0482, or 877-290-6767 (toll-free).

Calling All Artists….

Recreation Center Seeks Artisans

The Newport Rec Center is looking for artists interested in exhibiting their handmade items at the annual Autumn Fest Art Show on Nov 13th. Taking place in the large gym, this event brings together artists in one place for convenient shopping. Items featured are photography, paintings, jewelry, ceramics, wood working, decorative signs, and more. “We had to cancel last year because of covid, but we are optimistic we can have a safe event this year,” says Recreation Program Specialist Jenni Remillard. “We have a mix of returning artists and a few new ones so far. We are excited to see what everyone has been up to.” Autumn Fest is a great place to get a head start on holiday shopping. A free Kid’s Corner will be available for supervised activities while adults check out the tables. The event is held from 10am to 4pm, Saturday, Nov 13th. Cost for a booth with an 8 foot table is $35, or $40 for a corner booth with two tables. Booths will be distanced and everyone is required to wear a mask. If you are interested in exhibiting, visit the special events tab here https://secure.rec1.com/OR/newport-or/catalog or contact Remillard at j.remillard@newportoregon.gov for more information.

Report from Lincoln County Health Department

Covid-19 Delta variant

Lincoln County Public Health

COVID-19 Update September 13, 2021
There were 56 new COVID-19 cases reported Friday through Sunday for a total of 292 cases so far in September.  Lincoln County has 3 new hospitalizations and no new deaths.  Five COVID-19 patients are currently in local hospitals and none are in the intensive care unit.

Public Health’s vaccination clinics will now have Free COVID-19 testing as well. You can show up just to get a test, a vaccine, or both! Today, there is a clinic at the Sea Note in Yachats from 3pm – 7pm. Tomorrow we will be at Oregon Coast Community College in South Beach from 10am – 2pm.

If you are required by your employer or by administrative rule to be fully vaccinated by October 18th, then TODAY is the last day to start the Pfizer vaccination series. Or you can get the Johnson & Johnson single dose by October 4th. It is too late to start the Moderna series and still meet the October 18th deadline.

To get information about COVID-19 testing, vaccinations and more, call 211 or visit the Lincoln County website under the section called “What’s New.”

Oregon Coast Commercial Fishermen say the fish catches have dropped…they need $$ help!

Yaquina Bay Harbor
Season catch waaay down….

Governor Brown is being urged to request, from the federal government, disaster relief for Oregon’ commercial salmon industry which has suffered yet another low catch similar to the last three years. The salmon catch of $1.5 million in 2020 produced an historic low.

Fishermen say “It’s more than just trying to preserve one of Oregon’s most important industries. It’s about the hardworking men and women of Oregon’s commercial salmon industry that has been harmed by circumstances beyond their control due to Global Warming. Our commercial salmon industry needs the assurance that the State of Oregon and the federal government are willing to lend their support during difficult times.”

The Oregon Legislative Coastal Caucus includes bipartisan representatives and senators from coastal districts from Astoria to Brookings. It’s chaired by Representative David Gomberg (D-Otis), Vice-Chair Senator Dick Anderson (R-Lincoln City), and includes Senators Betsy Johnson (D-Scappoose) and Dallas Heard (R-Roseburg) and Representatives Suzanne Weber (R-Tillamook), Boomer Wright (R-Coos Bay), and David Brock Smith (R-Port Orford).

Day by Day, Week by Month, Month by Year – Solar Energy is gradually arriving…

County Commissioners to save imperiled homes on cliffs in Gleneden Beach

Several structures threatened by beach erosion to be given some help by county commissioners.

Lincoln County Commissioners have found a way to save some cliff-imperiled multi-million dollar homes and other facilities in Gleneden Beach.  County Commissioners convinced state officials to transform a set of Oregon laws that will allow the rehabilitation of shore-eroded cliffs that the homes over-look.  Those facilities include Searidge Condominiums, Worldmark Gleneden Resort and other homes owned by several other families.

Under regular state law the homes and resorts might have been forced to be abandoned due to the sea eroding the cliffs.  But a state law was modified to strengthen the hillsides with lots of dirt fill and huge boulders to ensure that no structure falls down onto the beach below.  A formal approval of the arrangement will be part of the County Commission’s regular meeting this coming Wednesday when further details surrounding the issue will be forthcoming.

Florence Festival of Books September 17 & 18

Lori Tobias
Writer, Publisher

This year marks the 10th year of the Florence Festival of Books—Sept.17-18—which should have been last year, but we all know the story of 2020.  Co-founder Judy Fleagle likes to say she was tricked into starting the festival after her friend and Florence First Citizen Dick Smith overheard her complaining about a similar event being held outside. The wind was a nuisance and Fleagle wondered out loud why it wasn’t held indoors. Next thing she knew her name, along with co-founder Connie Bradley’s, was on the Florence Events Center schedule as director of the Florence Festival of Books. Eleven years later, Fleagle’s still loving it.

I’ve been there with my novel, “Wander,” for three festivals and have my table reserved this year for “Wander,” and my memoir, “Storm Beat – A Journalist Reports from the Oregon Coast,” released one year ago this month by Oregon State University Press. It’s a fun time. Lots of people, most eager to meet the authors and talk books. This year, there’ll be social distancing and masks, but I’m betting it’s still going to be a great weekend.
I caught up with Fleagle for a look behind the scenes:

LT: How has the festival grown?
JF: That first year, we hoped for 20 people to sign up and within the first week we had 20 people and the next, 40 people and the next, 60 people—authors and publishers. So, right from the start, people signed up for it. We really didn’t know what we were doing. Now, most years, it’s about 75 – 80 authors and about 8 to 10 publishers. But this year because of COVID, it is limited to 48 tables. Some of these are shared tables with two different authors

LT: How many show up to buy books?
JF: We get anywhere from 300 to 500. I think one year we had 600. The year we had the most, there was an Oktoberfest by the port. We had a big storm. It was pouring and the tents wouldn’t hold and everyone came to our event inside.

LT: What do you enjoy most about it?
JF: For me, it’s seeing other authors and connecting with them. I hate to say networking because that sounds like you are trying to get something. Just the friendliness, the camaraderie, the feeling of, ‘Hi, I haven’t seen you since last year.’ Authors work alone. So, it’s neat to connect with other authors who do the same thing.

LT: What do you think visitors like?
JF: Visitors usually come to see specific people. They’ll come in and check out where they are and go right there and then they’ll wander around. People like seeing people that they’ve read. It’s a fun thing. I always tell myself I am going to buy a book or two and end up buying five or six.
I’ve had really fabulous experiences with my books. Engineering types like to talk about “Crossings: McCullough’s Coastal Bridges.” They will come to my table, hold my hand, look into my eyes and say, ‘I love your book.’ I say, ‘We’ve just met.’

LT: How is this festival different from other book festivals?
JF: It’s at the coast. That’s the key. People like any excuse to come to the coast. It is also, we’re always told, well organized. People like that. The reason we are so well organized is, I used to teach first grade. The key to teaching first grade—most people think it’s patience—it’s organization. If you have to spend two minutes looking around for anything, you lose them.

LT: You just launched a new book. Tell us about it.
JF: The title is “The Cancer Blog — For those who have had cancer and those who haven’t.”
It’s a week-by-week look at navigating chemo. I love the way it turned out. I write a blog post every Friday. I have since 2011. During the time I was undergoing chemotherapy over a 5 month period, I continued to write every Friday. Each chapter is dated. When you are reading that chapter you don’t know what is going to happen in the future. Some are really humorous, like when I had my head shaved and tried on all these wigs. It’s humorous as well as positive and the bottom line is I survived late-stage lymphoma. My only chance of beating it was if I could handle the chemo. I handled it. I write about the things they tell you to expect and I write about the things they don’t tell you. You have a period where the chemo hits you and you have sort of a black hole you go into and you have no energy. I live by myself with a cat. The first time around I didn’t have anybody here to help me. You get up, go to the kitchen, feed the cat, go back to bed. You just have to rest every two seconds.

As you go through it, your body weakens and each time it zaps you a little farther. It wasn’t easy, but I could handle it. I’ve been around people who couldn’t and that’s bad. It’s not a fun experience. The only way you can survive it (mentally) is if you have a support system and a positive attitude. The reason I put this into a book is because as I would meet people who were either going through chemo or knew somebody who was. I’d say I have these blog posts.

I shared them with 15 or 20 people who then shared them with more people and almost all said, ‘You ought to put these into a book.’ I said, I have plenty to do, I don’t need another book. At Christmas, I ran them off for a friend. I hadn’t read them in years. I said, ‘Whoa, these would make a good book.’ Once it was my idea, I jumped right on it. And now I have a book.

For more on the Florence Festival of Books: http://www.florencefestivalofbooks.org/

 

Battle between those who want quiet, enjoyable neighborhoods vs. neighborhoods with chronic constant turnover…

Retain Residents – Restore Neighborhoods

When too much emphasis is put on tourist accommodations, which causes the loss of single family homes and turning them into Short Term Rentals (STR’s), we lose more than a sense of community. For Lincoln County the cost was greater than 2,000 homes sacrificed to provide tourist accommodations. Many single family neighborhoods outside city limits have become hunting grounds for investors intent on creating a resort environment.  We must ask ourselves why we aren’t encouraging community relationships that come with having real neighbors?

November’s election will bring forth measure 21-203. A yes vote will help restore single family homes in neighborhoods outside the cities through a 5-year phase out of STRs. The STRs within cities will still remain. But don’t be fooled into thinking this will sink the county economy. We already have a diverse economy. Isn’t retention of our vital residents working in healthcare, schools, fisheries, science, trades, fire and police important? Let’s value our residents, new and old, for them to have available housing along with sufficient water, food and shelter. Don’t discount the importance of feeling secure and respected – not only for being part of the greater coastal community, but also for the neighborhoods in which we live.

Individuals opposing measure 21-203 want Lincoln County voters to believe that homes converted to STRs are not financially feasible for residents. But residents come from all different financial backgrounds. People living in neighborhoods outside the cities have bore witness to the lifeline that was provided when the Board of Commissioners put a temporary moratorium on licensing new STRs.  What was happening was that a door was opened by County Commissioners for residents, new and old, to buy homes that formerly would have been snatched up and converted to STRs. It happened in my own neighborhood. But it wasn’t long before two former STRs were sold and then bought by full time residents. This benefits not only our neighborhood but the whole county. These are families serving the community in vital jobs and including community volunteering. Putting the needs of residents first strengthens Lincoln County.

Traci Burks, CMA
Unincorporated Lincoln County

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The above editorial is that of the writer and not necessarily reflective of the opinions of the staff and management of NewsLincolnCounty.com.

Fall Term Coming Up at OOCC – Get Ready to Expand Your Minds

Oregon Coast Community College
Newport

College offers one-stop admissions, advising, registration event  Event set for 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 14 at OCCC’s Central County Campus in Newport 

The Fall term at Oregon Coast Community College begins on Sept. 27. Students from all walks of life will gather for the term in a robust lineup of in-person and online course offerings. Some will be beginning (or re-starting) a two-year transfer degree, saving thousands as they pursue an eventual four-year university degree. Others will be working to become a teacher here in Lincoln County, through OCCC’s “teach at the beach” program, created in concert with the Lincoln County School District. Still others will be pursuing a two-year degree in business, a certificate in Early Childhood Education, or one of a number of other disciplines. 

Though the start of the term is just around the corner, there is still time from brand-new and returning students to get registered for the new term.  The last opportunity to get admitted for the fall term, meet with an advisor, and register for classes – all in one convenient event – is coming on Tuesday, Sept. 14. 

The event will be held from 10 a.m. to Noon at OCCC’s Central County Campus, at 400 SE College Way, in Newport. Participants will then be invited to return at 1 p.m. for a new-student orientation, which will run to 3 p.m. 

To learn more, call 541-867-8501.  

Pre-registration for the Sept. 14 event is not required, and all are welcome to attend. Participants are encouraged to bring unofficial transcripts of high school records or other colleges attended, if available.  

Editorial: Saving neighborhoods from mini-motel houses is on the ballot…

Retain Residents Restore Neighborhoods

When too much emphasis is put on tourist accommodations by welcoming the loss of single family homes to STR investment the consequence is high. For Lincoln County the cost is greater than 2,000 homes sacrificed to provide tourist accommodations. Many once single family neighborhoods outside the cities have become stomping grounds for resort-like behavior. We must ask ourselves why we aren’t encouraging community relationships that come with having neighbors?

November’s election will bring forth measure 21-203. A yes vote will help restore single family homes in neighborhoods outside the cities through a 5-year phase out of STRs. The STRs within cities will still remain. Don’t be fooled into thinking this will sink the county economy. We have a diverse economy. Isn’t retention of our vital residents working in healthcare, schools, fisheries, science, trades, fire and police important? Let’s value our residents new and old enough to want them to have available housing. Life’s necessities include water, food and shelter. Don’t discount the importance of feeling secure and respected. These two often come from not only being part of the greater coastal community, but also from the neighborhoods in which we live.

Individuals opposing measure 21-203 want you the Lincoln County voters to believe that homes converted to STRs are not financially feasible for residents. Residents come come from all different financial backgrounds, therefore don’t judge purchasing power. People living in neighborhoods outside the cities have bore witness to the lifeline that was provided when the board of commissioners put a temporary moratorium on licensing new STRs. The truth of what happened during this time is a door was opened for residents new and old to purchase homes that formerly would have been snatched up for STR use. It happened in my own neighborhood. Two former STRs were sold and then bought by full time residents. This benefits not only our neighborhood but the whole county. These are families serving the community in vital jobs and through volunteering. Putting the needs of residents first strengthens the county.

Traci Burks, CMA
Unincorporated Lincoln County

Newport Symphony Season Opener

 

Newport Symphony Season Opener

Homecoming, Reflection, and Celebration

The NSO returns to the Performing Arts Center Stage for the first time since January 2020.

The 2021-22 concert season of the Newport Symphony Orchestra at the Ocean kicks off Saturday, September 18 at 7:30pm and Sunday, September 19 at 2:00pm at the Newport Performing Arts Center with a performance of Mozart’s Rondo for Violin and Orchestra in B flat major. The NSO’s charismatic Concertmaster Casey Bozell is the violin soloist.

Music Director and Conductor Adam Flatt will lead the Orchestra in performances of William Schuman’s “When Jesus Wept” and George Walker’s Lyric for Strings. The concert finale will be Joseph Haydn’s joyful Symphony no. 43, “Mercury.”

Casey Bozell is an energetic performer based in Portland, Oregon. She is an active solo, chamber, and orchestral player. She also holds positions with the Portland Opera Orchestra and Oregon Ballet Theater. Her solo performances include the Newport Symphony, Beaverton Symphony, Linfield Chamber Orchestra, Corban University Orchestra, and the Central Oregon Chamber Orchestra. She has served on the faculty of the Young Musicians and Artists summer camp since 2010 and is a founding member of the Portland-based piano trio Hammers and Bows.

Performances on Saturday include a pre-concert talk by Conductor Adam Flatt at 6:45p.m. Due to the pandemic the post-concert Wine Down receptions supported by Flying Dutchman Winery will not take place at this time.

There are Vaccination and Mask Protocols for attendance at this event. Detailed information available on the symphony website; www.newportsymphony.org

Tickets, $27 and $42 (plus fees) and $10 for students are on sale at the Performing Arts Center box office, by calling 541-265-2787 or online at NewportSymphony.org. The Center is located at 777 West Olive in Newport.

The Angels Ball & Fantasy of the Trees 2021 – Cancelled

The Angels Ball & Fantasy of Trees 2021 CANCELLED
 
Lincoln City, OR – Due to the possibility of spreading Covid 19, the Board of Directors of Angels Anonymous has decided to cancel the 2021 Angels Ball and Festival of Trees scheduled for December 1 through December 4, 2021.

The Angels Ball generates the greatest share of funding needed to make it possible for Angels Anonymous to help residents in the North Lincoln County area with immediate and basic needs. In 2020, even though the Ball was cancelled, donations from members of the community and beyond made it possible to lend a helping hand to those who so desperately needed it. Over 148 families in 2020, many of them victims of the Echo Mountain Fire, were assisted last year, and the need has continued in 2021.

A huge vote of thanks goes out to our sponsors and donors for supporting our mission. Your help has provided a lifeline to literally hundreds of families over the past 23 years.  Lincoln County is still facing the struggle presented by the present pandemic and, as winter approaches, we anticipate that the need for support will continue to be high.

We ask for your support in this coming year and hope to see you all again at the Angel’s Ball in 2022, when we can celebrate the Holidays with renewed hope and the joy of the Angels.

If you wish to make a monetary donation to Angel’s Anonymous call 541-994-2651 or send your donation to Angels Anonymous, PO Box 554, Lincoln City 97367.

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