Our Sponsors

WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

audiology title=

barrelhead

prp

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc

audiology title=

barrelhead

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc

barrelhead

 

Coast Tree

Oregon on the verge of shutting back down again due to variant viruses

Governor Kate Brown Provides Updates on COVID-19 in Oregon

With the fourth surge of spread upon us, Governor reminds Oregonians that vaccines are the best protection against the virus 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown held a press conference today to provide an update on the status of COVID-19 in Oregon, and to urge Oregonians to make a plan to get vaccinated.

“In the race between vaccines and variants, right now the variants have the upper hand,” said Governor Brown. “Today’s cases topped 1,000, with Oregon now ranking second in the nation for having the most rapid growth of infection spread. Our hospitals are about to surpass 300 positive COVID-19 cases. That means several counties are on the verge of having to reinstate Extreme Risk restrictions on businesses and activities.

“At this moment, we are moving backwards. Oregon needs to be moving forward. My goal is to get the state back on track to lift the restrictions this pandemic has forced upon us — I think we can get there by the start of summer, but we will all need to work together.

“In order to fully reopen our economy, we need to reach a significant majority of Oregonians with a vaccine; we need to close the equity gap in our vaccine efforts; and vaccine supplies need to be readily available for all eligible Oregonians who want to be protected. Vaccines are your best protection against the variants and the quickest way for us all to get back to the people and things we miss the most.

“That’s the hill on the horizon. We can climb it together. How quickly we get there is up to each and every one of us.”

A copy of the Governor’s prepared remarks from today’s press conference is available here.

More information on vaccines is available at covidvaccine.oregon.gov.

Rising COVID-19 hospitalizations highlight need for vaccinations

(LINCOLN COUNTY, Oregon – April 23rd) – As of the writing of this release on April 23, Samaritan Health Services was caring for 19 patients with COVID-19 in its five hospitals in Albany, Corvallis, Lebanon, Lincoln City and Newport.

This is the highest number of coronavirus inpatients in Samaritan facilities since mid-January, and the most coronavirus patients between the ages of 40 and 59 since November 2020.

“Though the numbers of new cases had decreased in an encouraging way, for the last four days, Oregon has seen 1,000 or more new coronavirus cases per day,” said Infectious Disease Specialist Adam Brady, MD, of the Samaritan Coronavirus Task Force. “This underscores the importance of vaccinating as many people as possible as soon as possible.”

If you have not yet been vaccinated for COVID-19, please make an appointment as soon as you can. If you have been vaccinated, thanks for doing everything you can to help end this pandemic. Please encourage your family and friends to get vaccinated as soon as possible as well. It is 100% free of charge to all people.

To schedule an appointment for COVID-19 vaccination:

Visit samhealth.org/GetTheVaccine, where you will find scheduling links for county vaccination events when appointments are available. There are also some clinics with walk-in availability. If no appointments are currently available, you are encouraged to check back often as appointments are added regularly when supply is available.
If you or someone you know does not have internet access through a computer or smart phone, the Samaritan COVID-19 vaccine scheduling hotline is available at 855-441-2311.

Another option is to visit local pharmacy websites. Helpful websites for finding pharmacies with appointments include vaccinefinder.org and vaccinespotter.org/OR.

For more information about Samaritan Health Services’ response to the COVID-19 pandemic, visit samhealth.org/Coronavirus.

Newport City Council to evaluate sizeable bump in vacation room taxes

Yaquina Bay Bridge
Newport

NEWPORT CITY COUNCIL
TO HOLD PUBLIC HEARING ON POTENTIAL TRANSIENT ROOM TAX INCREASE

The Newport City Council will hold a public hearing on raising transient room taxes Monday, May 17, during its regularly scheduled City Council meeting.  The city will public comment on the issue.  A potential increase of the transient room tax could rise to 12%. The current transient room tax rate is 9.5% for hotels, motels, vacation rentals, and campgrounds. The meeting will begin at 6:00 P.M., and the agenda will be accessible on the city website at newportoregon.gov, at the close of business on May 13, 2021.

Over the past three years, the Newport City Council tasked its Finance Work Groups with developing a system for projecting the city’s long-range financial condition; identifying options to address the structural deficit in the General Fund by reducing expenditures and/or increasing revenues; and developing a five-year financial plan for the city that achieves financial sustainability during this period.

In addition, the Work Groups reviewed estimates of future funding needed to properly maintain the 48 public structures and facilities supported by the General Fund. These community amenities include the Library, Performing Arts Center, Visual Arts Center, Recreation Center, 60+ Center, numerous parks and trails, fire stations, city hall, airport, and other key pieces of the infrastructure, some of which currently require significant reinvestment at this stage in order to extend their life spans. The city has a significant gap in meeting the estimated cost of replacing roofs, windows, and siding, and interior maintenance while also funding other required needs for the its many facilities. These are the very amenities that make Newport a special place for its residents and visitors. The Finance Work Group outlined a number of steps for the city to increase revenues while maintaining control of expenses. But these measures will not, by themselves, address the significant financial requirements needed for the next five-years and beyond.

The Finance Work Group reviewed options to address this issue recognizing that the city has already significantly reduced expenditures in the current fiscal year as part of its COVID-19 budget. That budget included the elimination of 22 full-time-equivalent positions effective on July 1, 2020, and the mandatory furlough of all non-union represented employees for a period of 12 days from July to December of 2020.

After reviewing opportunities to reduce expenses, the Finance Work Group focused on revenue options that would share the burden of financing government services and facilities between residents and visitors. While many cities resort to special tax levies, public safety fees and other charges on utility bills to meet financial needs, the Finance Work Group recommended that the city focus on mechanisms to draw revenue from all users of city’s services. The Work Group recommended that the City Council consider increasing the transient room tax effective July 1, 2021. The change from the current 9.5% up to 12% would fund both tourism promotion and facilities that provide services to visitors.  It will also add additional support to the city’s General Fund for public safety, general government, and other activities. Instead of imposing a property tax hike or raising fees on water bills to cover things like public safety and other city programs, the burden would fall directly on the customers of hotels, motels, and vacation rentals.  It becomes a consumer tax instead instead of relying on local residents and businesses.

Transient room tax is imposed by cities and counties across Oregon, and under current state law, 70% is required to be spent on advertising/marketing and tourist facilities, which benefits lodging properties. ECO Northwest compiled 2018 room tax information as part of its local transient lodging tax expenditure and administration report. The room tax rates on the coast are generally higher than in the rest of the state. Coastal respondent’s transient room tax rates range from 1% for the City of Tillamook to 12% in Warrenton. Astoria is 11%, unincorporated Clatsop County is 10.5%, Lincoln County, Rockaway Beach, Seaside, and Tillamook County are at 10%, with Newport at 9.5%, as reported for 2018.

How can you participate in a City Council meeting during COVID-19 restrictions? City Council meetings are conducted in a hybrid format. Hybrid meetings are held in the City Council Chambers of the Newport City Hall. In-person audience size is limited to 15 – 18 people.

All virtual public meetings of the City of Newport are livestreamed and televised on Charter Channel 190. To access the livestream, visit the City of Newport website at www.newportoregon.gov. Once there, click on “City Government;” then click on “City Council;” then an “in progress” note will appear if the meeting is underway; click on the “in progress” link to watch the livestream. It is not possible to get into a meeting that will be livestreamed before the meeting starts.

If you wish to make a “real time” comment at this public hearing, a request to speak should be made by noon, on May 17, 2021. The request should be e-mailed to publiccomment@newportoregon.gov. Once a request to speak has been received, staff will send the requestor the Zoom meeting link. This link will allow a requestor to participate via video or telephone. Please note that anyone participating by Zoom will be in the waiting room until the item the public hearing is opened by the Mayor.

To submit a written public comment for this hearing, e-mail the written comment to publiccomment@newportoregon.gov. The e-mail must be received by noon on May 17, 2021. Written public comment received by noon on May 17 will be included in the meeting materials, and acknowledged, at the appropriate time, by the Mayor. If a specific request is made to read written public comment into the record during a meeting, the City Recorder, or designee, will be provided a maximum of three minutes to read the comment during the meeting.

The Finance Work Group report can be found at

https://newportoregon.gov/dept/fin/documents/3-10- 21_Final_Combined_Finance_Work_Group_Report.pdf

We encourage your participation in this public hearing, and look forward to your input.

What’s up in Toledo?

TOLEDO CHAMBER OF
COMMERCE NEWS FLASH APRIL 23, 2021
WELCOME TO OUR NEWEST MEMBER OF THE TOLEDO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE,
WINTER HAWK SEAFOOD
They sell the BEST canned Albacore Tuna anywhere! MADE HERE IN TOLEDO. SEE THEM THIS SUMMER AT THE TOLEDO WATERFRONT MARKET, starting in June and at the TOLEDO SWAP MEET AND CLASSIC CAR EXHIBITION on June 27th. Or call now to order 541-270-0791 or 541-961-7535
SIGN UP TO BE A VENDOR AT THE TOLEDO WATERFRONT MARKET,THURSDAYS JUNE THROUGH AUGUST OR AT THE TOLEDO SWAP MEET AND CLASSIC CAR EXHIBITION, JUNE 27th. To see details and sign up go to our website Toledo Chamber of Commerce Website and click on Events, call 541-336-3183 or email director@toledooregon.org
THE TOLEDO CEMETARY ASSOCIATION IS LOOKING FOR VOLUNTEERS TO HELP CLEAN UP THE TOLEDO COMMUNITY CEMETARY ON MAY 22ND AT 4PM. IF YOU CAN HELP, CALL TONY MOLINA 541-444-2828
Friday, April 23rd, at the Toledo Elks Lodge, the crew is back! Mack, Jim Franklin, Patty Grove, & George and Kathy Crane will be serving a BACON WRAPPED FILET MIGNON dinner from 5:30 to 7 pm. For Elks Members and their Guests. We welcome all visitors to the Toledo Elks Lodge.

And the number of Covid Virus cases continue to climb…

Weekly COVID-19 reports

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows a fourth consecutive week of surging daily cases and higher hospitalizations than the previous week.

OHA reported 4,742 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, April 12 through Sunday, April 18. That represents a 27% increase from the previous week and marks the fourth consecutive week in which daily cases have increased by at least 20%.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations rose to 171, up from 156 last week.

There were 19 reported COVID-19 related deaths.

There were 113,817 tests for COVID-19 for the week of April 11 through April 17. The percentage of positive tests was 5.3%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 40% of COVID-19 related hospitalizations and 76% of COVID-19 related deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 24 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (24), Clackamas (61), Clatsop (7), Columbia (7), Coos (2), Crook (4), Curry (5), Deschutes (99), Douglas (7), Grant (10), Harney (2),  Hood River (5), Jackson (93), Jefferson (3), Josephine (23), Klamath (34), Lake (3), Lane (82), Linn (33), Malheur (3), Marion (114), Morrow (3), Multnomah (167), Polk (20), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (16), Wallowa (1), Wasco (3), Washington (134) and Yamhill (13).

Oregon’s 2,461st COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on April 16 and died on April 13 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,462nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on April 16 and died on April 19 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,463rd COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on March 29 and died on April 18 at Asante Ashland Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,464th COVID-19 death is a 42-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on March 25 and died on April 18 at Asante Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,465th COVID-19 death is a 48-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 16 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,466th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 1 and died on April 16 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Moving from high school to college is a very big deal – It affects your whole life it lifts up all who get their degree!

Oregon Coast Community College
Newport

How do you bridge the gap between graduating from high school and starting college?

Oregon Coast Community College’s Navigate Program will be offing a free summer course to assist incoming freshmen to further improve their skills and strengthen their college readiness by providing the tools needed to develop, manage and thrive in their first year of college. Academic resources, Campus Life, and Financial Literacy are just a few of the topics explored.

We will provide tips for success covering areas such as study groups and how they can improve study habits, test anxiety and ways to reduce stress, effective reading strategies and how to survive the pressure of finals week. Provide personal empowerment information focused on building a student’s mindset to maintain a positive outlook and disrupt negative self-reflection. Present tips on basic setup and structure of writing research papers.

Have more questions? Attend the virtual OCCC Open House April 26th and 27th beginning at 6:30 pm and going until 8:00 pm. There will be four sessions offered throughout the evening and seven rooms with different themes available allowing you to choose your own areas of interest and to pursue questions you may have regarding attending college.

Raising money for Samaritan Health Services


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Media contact: Mary Jo Kerlin, Marketing & Communications Strategist (Lincoln County)
Lincoln City: 541-557-6208 Newport: 541-574-4898

Hospital Auxiliary Partners with Bob’s Beach Books for Spring Book Sale

Lincoln City – There are many good reasons to participate in this year’s Spring Book Sale hosted at Bob’s Beach Books in Lincoln City and benefiting the Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital Auxiliary. You support your local hospital by supporting its auxiliary. Your purchases help to support a local business. And, to paraphrase the bookstore’s popular slogan: You can fight evil by reading books!

Here’s how to participate in this annual sale which runs May 1 through May 15:  You can shop in person at Bob’s Beach Books, 1735 NW Hwy. 101, in the Oceanlake district of Lincoln City. Check their website (bobsbeachbooks.net) for bookstore hours, the number of people that can be allowed in the store at one time, etc. Remember to wear a face mask that covers your mouth and nose at all times while in the store.  Place an order by calling 541-994-4467 or place an order by email at bobsbeachbooks@gmail.com.
If you place an order by phone or email you will be notified when it’s ready for pick-up. You can also place a special order for a specific book.

Proceeds will help fund one of the ongoing hospital projects, so be sure to tell the bookstore manager to include your purchase with this Spring Book Sale.

More work to be done this summer in Newport

Newport City Hall

The City of Newport Public Works Department advises that work will soon commence on the Sanitary Sewer Rehabilitation Project. This involves the replacement of damaged and deteriorated gravity sewer lines in the northwest area of the City, bounded by NW 3rd St, NW 22nd St., and US Highway 101.

The contractor is Advanced Excavation, Inc.

In most repair locations there will be single-lane access with traffic control signage and flaggers. There will be signed detour routes around other repair locations.

The project will start on Monday, May 3, and be completed by early August.

Read it and be forewarned….another surge is underway by Covid-19

Click on graphic for tableau.

As you can see, we’re in for another surge of the Covid-19 Virus.  Too many people not wearing masks, not ensuring proper distancing and probably not washing their hands enough.  So many Americans, without a tight grip on reality, become victims of a deadly virus.

Oregon reports 993 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 1 new death

There is one new COVID-19 related death in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,467, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 993 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 178,110.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA has reported that 48,387 new doses of COVID-19 vaccinations were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 28,535 doses were administered on April 21 and 19,852 were administered on previous days but were entered into the vaccine registry on April 21. Cumulative daily totals can take several days to finalize.

The seven-day running average is now 34,328 doses per day.

Oregon has now administered a total of 1,398,442 doses of Pfizer, 1,172,051 doses of Moderna and 91,160 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines. As of today, 1,091,777 people have completed a COVID-19 vaccine series. There are 1,658,130 who have had at least one dose.

To date, 1,683,045 doses of Pfizer, 1,432,000 doses of Moderna and 215,000 doses of Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 vaccines have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (14), Benton (24), Clackamas (116), Clatsop (4), Columbia (14), Coos (6), Crook (12), Curry (2), Deschutes (57), Douglas (5), Grant (1), Hood River (5), Jackson (46), Jefferson (6), Josephine (17), Klamath (54), Lake (2), Lane (54), Lincoln (7), Linn (34), Malheur (2), Marion (109), Morrow (1), Multnomah (206), Polk (20), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (8), Union (2), Wasco (16), Washington (128) and Yamhill (20).

A virus that just won’t quit.  Until more citizens are vaccinated and practice handwashing, mask wearing, and social distancing, the virus will take many more lives.

IT’S EARTH DAY!!

The list of presenters and their times:

7:00 pm Welcome – basic rules of courtesy – Martin Desmond
7:05 pm Introduction of Dorothy Black Crow – Chandler Davis
7:07 pm Dorothy Black Crow – Native American prayer
7:10 pm Musician Terry Filer – Native American flute
7:15 pm Commissioner Claire Hall
7:20 pm Lincoln County Climate Action Plan (Martin, Bill, June, Fred and Joanne)
7:28 pm Musician Dave Orleans – All the Rivers Run
7:34 pm Britney VanCitters – Oregon League of Conservation Voters
7:39 pm Lincoln County School District kids presentation
7:45 pm Never Ever Band – Laughing Child
7:51 pm Toledo City Councilor Betty Kamikawa
7:56 pm Audubon Society of Lincoln City – Steve Griffiths
8:01 pm Musician Chandler Davis – multicultural drumming
 8:08 pm Animated climate video – Pat DeLaQuil
8:12 pm Newport City Councilor Cynthia Jacobi
8:17 pm Musician Allen Mullen – I wonder
8:22 pm MidCoast Watersheds Council – Trevor Griffiths
8:27 pm Fields of Peace – Charles Busch / Deborah Hobbie
8:32 pm Musician Bill Kucha – Ordinary Human
8:37 pm BLM Yaquina Head – Christopher Carpenter
8:42 pm Musician Robert Rubin
8:47 pm Lincoln City Councilor Riley Hoagland
8:52 pm Musicians Chayag En Familia – Andean Folk music and dance
8:57 pm Ending song – Dave Orleans – Little Blue Top

For more information, please contact Martin Desmond at martinjdesmond@gmail.com

Toledo City Council aims to change things around during the pandemic

Toledo City Hall
206 Main Street
Toledo
Google Maps

Toledo City Councilors debated for quite a while Wednesday night on how to pull the city’s pan out of the fire.  Toledo needs improvements to its water and sewer operations and they need them soon.  Toledo’s water and sewer systems are getting to be pretty old.  Toledo Mayor Rod Cross then guided the city council through a number of options on how to re-strengthen the city’s water and sewer systems. 

Mayor Cross suggested a bold plan to raise the money to bring the city back to its former glory – or pretty close to it.  A utilities expert told the council that creating urban renewal properties in and around the town would be a viable option.  One councilor strongly urged that various pieces of Toledo could be designated urban renewal zones.  The plan could designate certain stretches of property, especially in the downtown area that could, through Urban Renewal programs, gradually raise money ( from rising tax assessments out five to ten years) which would provide sufficient growth of property taxes to enable a major make-over of the town.

The City Council told their private consultant making such a huge move might be just what the doctor ordered.   (To be continued).

Meanwhile…there’s a move afoot for Toledo to get some electric car charging stations. No definitive locations for the electric “filling stations” as yet but the council seemed satisfied that such charging stations are unavoidable and likely very affordable.  Electric cars are becoming more and more refined.  During conversations with each other, city councilors said 300 to 400 mile jaunts wouldn’t phase the driver(s) and/or business or family members.  It was agreed that battery assisted hybrids are the coming thing.  And it’s believed that within 5 to 10 years long range batteries will drive out gasoline as the world’s chosen fuel.

And finally, a hopeful Mayor Cross said the pandemic will be petering out if not this summer then perhaps the fall.  It all depends on how many Americans get their anti-Covid-19 shots.  The issue is still up in the air and medical experts that are still learning the “evolving” ropes on the virus are hoping enough Americans will get their vaccinations and then get on with their lives.  As a wise Chinese philosopher said to a friend headed for China, “May you live in interesting times.”

 

Stuggling to restore normalcy across the country…

Sen. Jeff Merkley
D-Oregon

Merkley Pushes Biden Administration to Address Western Wildfires, Affordable Housing Crisis, Urgently Needed Water Infrastructure in American Jobs Plan 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon’s U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley—the only member of the Oregon delegation to serve on a congressional Appropriations Committee since Senator Mark Hatfield—urged Biden administration officials during yesterday’s Senate Appropriations Committee hearing to ensure that the American Jobs Plan will include a transformative investment in affordable housing across America; assist Western states recover from and prevent catastrophic wildfires; and provide water infrastructure funding for states, Tribes, territories, and disadvantaged communities.

“Every American—regardless of the color of their skin, their zip code, or their income—deserves to be healthy and safe,” said Merkley, who serves as Chair of the powerful Interior Appropriations Subcommittee. “But it’s impossible to thrive when your community is ravaged by wildfires, there aren’t any affordable places to live, or there isn’t reliable access to clean drinking water. As we set out to rebuild our country and create jobs in the wake of this pandemic, delivering and investing in these core pillars must be a top priority.”

Testifying before the Committee were U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Michael Regan, U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Secretary Marcia Fudge, U.S. Department of Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg, and U.S. Department of Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo.

Merkley has been a leader in advocating for the forest management policies, climate action, and recovery assistance communities throughout the West need to get back on their feet following a series of catastrophic wildfires. He has also long championed the Water Infrastructure and Innovation Act (WIFIA)—a program he created in 2013 to establish a financial mechanism within the EPA to provide access to lower-cost capital for investments in water infrastructure.

Video of the Senator’s remarks and questions is available here.

 

Leaving high school….enroute to college. Change is all around…

Oregon Coast Community College
Newport

How do you bridge the gap between graduating from high school and starting college?

Oregon Coast Community College’s Navigate Program will be offing a free summer course to assist incoming freshmen to further improve their skills and strengthen their college readiness by providing the tools needed to develop, manage and thrive in their first year of college. Academic resources, Campus Life, and Financial Literacy are just a few of the topics explored.

We will provide tips for success covering areas such as study groups and how they can improve study habits, test anxiety and ways to reduce stress, effective reading strategies and how to survive the pressure of finals week. Provide personal empowerment information focused on building a student’s mindset to maintain a positive outlook and disrupt negative self-reflection. Present tips on basic setup and structure of writing research papers.

Have more questions? Attend the virtual OCCC Open House April 26th and 27th beginning at 6:30 pm and going until 8:00 pm. There will be four sessions offered throughout the evening and seven rooms with different themes available allowing you to choose your own areas of interest and to pursue questions you may have regarding attending college.

 

Corona Virus Update

Oregon reports 989 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — There are six new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 2,466, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 989 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 177,134.

Weekly COVID-19 reports

The Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Weekly Report, released today, shows a fourth consecutive week of surging daily cases and higher hospitalizations than the previous week.

OHA reported 4,742 new daily cases of COVID-19 during the week of Monday, April 12 through Sunday, April 18. That represents a 27% increase from the previous week and marks the fourth consecutive week in which daily cases have increased by at least 20%.

New COVID-19 related hospitalizations rose to 171, up from 156 last week.

There were 19 reported COVID-19 related deaths.

There were 113,817 tests for COVID-19 for the week of April 11 through April 17. The percentage of positive tests was 5.3%.

People 70 years of age and older have accounted for 40% of COVID-19 related hospitalizations and 76% of COVID-19 related deaths.

Today’s COVID-19 Weekly Outbreak Report shows 24 active COVID-19 outbreaks in senior living communities and congregate living settings, with three or more confirmed cases and one or more COVID-19 related deaths.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (6), Benton (24), Clackamas (61), Clatsop (7), Columbia (7), Coos (2), Crook (4), Curry (5), Deschutes (99), Douglas (7), Grant (10), Harney (2),  Hood River (5), Jackson (93), Jefferson (3), Josephine (23), Klamath (34), Lake (3), Lane (82), Linn (33), Malheur (3), Marion (114), Morrow (3), Multnomah (167), Polk (20), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (16), Wallowa (1), Wasco (3), Washington (134) and Yamhill (13).

Oregon’s 2,461st COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man from Douglas County who tested positive on April 16 and died on April 13 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,462nd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old man from Benton County who tested positive on April 16 and died on April 19 at his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,463rd COVID-19 death is a 67-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on March 29 and died on April 18 at Asante Ashland Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,464th COVID-19 death is a 42-year-old man from Jackson County who tested positive on March 25 and died on April 18 at Asante Rogue Valley Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,465th COVID-19 death is a 48-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on March 28 and died on April 16 at Legacy Mount Hood Medical Center. He had no underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 2,466th COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man from Multnomah County who tested positive on April 1 and died on April 16 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Governor Brown pushes hard to get statewide Internet Broadband more easily accessible

Governor Kate Brown Calls on Legislature to Support Statewide Broadband Expansion

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today appeared before the Joint Subcommittee on Transportation and Economic Development to urge her support for investments in expanding broadband access statewide. The Governor’s Recommended Budget proposes an $118 million investment, with a focus on providing broadband access to underserved communities that have been disproportionately impacted during the pandemic; ensuring every school across Oregon is connected; and connecting 50 additional communities statewide.

“In today’s increasingly digital world, access to broadband is no longer a luxury — it is an absolute necessity,” said Governor Brown. “The internet has become the platform on which the world works, and broadband connectivity is becoming the universal common denominator — important and essential for all sectors of the economy, especially at a time when remote work is becoming more widely adopted.

“Broadband also opens up digital learning opportunities, brings the latest developments in science and technology into classrooms across Oregon; and makes knowledge accessible. And regardless of income level or zip code, the pandemic has demonstrated that every child must have access to broadband internet connections and digital learning devices for learning purposes.

“While we have made progress in deploying broadband infrastructure throughout the state in recent years, it is not enough. We have much more work to do to ensure equitable and reliable access across the entire state.

“The investments we make today with state dollars will have a lasting impact for years to come, and set us on track to further close the digital divide when additional federal dollars become available.”

A copy of the Governor’s prepared testimony is available here, and a letter of support from the Broadband Caucus is available here.

A recording of today’s committee hearing is available on the Oregon Legislature’s website.

A significant “OOPS!” at Newport’s Water Treatment Plant

Newport Wastewater Treatment Plant lost control of its effluent – treatment efficiency drooped.  But it’s back up to normal now.

Due to a failed pump, the Newport Wastewater Treatment Plant did not provide sufficient disinfection of effluent from approximately 6:55pm on Sunday April 18th until 8:08am Monday April 19. The problem was addressed and the plant is providing effective disinfection again.

A health hazard warning sign has been posted at Don Davis Park, near the affected area and sampling is being conducted to determine when the water is safe for contact. Contact with water contaminated with bacteria can increase the risk of disease. Please avoid contact with these water bodies until further notice.

martek martek barrelhead martek Coast Tree SquareSpace Square Space barrelhead oceancreek Sema Roofing wandr occc audiology title= barrelhead oceancreek Sema Roofing wandr occc

Our Sponsors