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Florence Festival of Books September 17 & 18

Lori Tobias
Writer, Publisher

This year marks the 10th year of the Florence Festival of Books—Sept.17-18—which should have been last year, but we all know the story of 2020.  Co-founder Judy Fleagle likes to say she was tricked into starting the festival after her friend and Florence First Citizen Dick Smith overheard her complaining about a similar event being held outside. The wind was a nuisance and Fleagle wondered out loud why it wasn’t held indoors. Next thing she knew her name, along with co-founder Connie Bradley’s, was on the Florence Events Center schedule as director of the Florence Festival of Books. Eleven years later, Fleagle’s still loving it.

I’ve been there with my novel, “Wander,” for three festivals and have my table reserved this year for “Wander,” and my memoir, “Storm Beat – A Journalist Reports from the Oregon Coast,” released one year ago this month by Oregon State University Press. It’s a fun time. Lots of people, most eager to meet the authors and talk books. This year, there’ll be social distancing and masks, but I’m betting it’s still going to be a great weekend.
I caught up with Fleagle for a look behind the scenes:

LT: How has the festival grown?
JF: That first year, we hoped for 20 people to sign up and within the first week we had 20 people and the next, 40 people and the next, 60 people—authors and publishers. So, right from the start, people signed up for it. We really didn’t know what we were doing. Now, most years, it’s about 75 – 80 authors and about 8 to 10 publishers. But this year because of COVID, it is limited to 48 tables. Some of these are shared tables with two different authors

LT: How many show up to buy books?
JF: We get anywhere from 300 to 500. I think one year we had 600. The year we had the most, there was an Oktoberfest by the port. We had a big storm. It was pouring and the tents wouldn’t hold and everyone came to our event inside.

LT: What do you enjoy most about it?
JF: For me, it’s seeing other authors and connecting with them. I hate to say networking because that sounds like you are trying to get something. Just the friendliness, the camaraderie, the feeling of, ‘Hi, I haven’t seen you since last year.’ Authors work alone. So, it’s neat to connect with other authors who do the same thing.

LT: What do you think visitors like?
JF: Visitors usually come to see specific people. They’ll come in and check out where they are and go right there and then they’ll wander around. People like seeing people that they’ve read. It’s a fun thing. I always tell myself I am going to buy a book or two and end up buying five or six.
I’ve had really fabulous experiences with my books. Engineering types like to talk about “Crossings: McCullough’s Coastal Bridges.” They will come to my table, hold my hand, look into my eyes and say, ‘I love your book.’ I say, ‘We’ve just met.’

LT: How is this festival different from other book festivals?
JF: It’s at the coast. That’s the key. People like any excuse to come to the coast. It is also, we’re always told, well organized. People like that. The reason we are so well organized is, I used to teach first grade. The key to teaching first grade—most people think it’s patience—it’s organization. If you have to spend two minutes looking around for anything, you lose them.

LT: You just launched a new book. Tell us about it.
JF: The title is “The Cancer Blog — For those who have had cancer and those who haven’t.”
It’s a week-by-week look at navigating chemo. I love the way it turned out. I write a blog post every Friday. I have since 2011. During the time I was undergoing chemotherapy over a 5 month period, I continued to write every Friday. Each chapter is dated. When you are reading that chapter you don’t know what is going to happen in the future. Some are really humorous, like when I had my head shaved and tried on all these wigs. It’s humorous as well as positive and the bottom line is I survived late-stage lymphoma. My only chance of beating it was if I could handle the chemo. I handled it. I write about the things they tell you to expect and I write about the things they don’t tell you. You have a period where the chemo hits you and you have sort of a black hole you go into and you have no energy. I live by myself with a cat. The first time around I didn’t have anybody here to help me. You get up, go to the kitchen, feed the cat, go back to bed. You just have to rest every two seconds.

As you go through it, your body weakens and each time it zaps you a little farther. It wasn’t easy, but I could handle it. I’ve been around people who couldn’t and that’s bad. It’s not a fun experience. The only way you can survive it (mentally) is if you have a support system and a positive attitude. The reason I put this into a book is because as I would meet people who were either going through chemo or knew somebody who was. I’d say I have these blog posts.

I shared them with 15 or 20 people who then shared them with more people and almost all said, ‘You ought to put these into a book.’ I said, I have plenty to do, I don’t need another book. At Christmas, I ran them off for a friend. I hadn’t read them in years. I said, ‘Whoa, these would make a good book.’ Once it was my idea, I jumped right on it. And now I have a book.

For more on the Florence Festival of Books: http://www.florencefestivalofbooks.org/

 

Battle between those who want quiet, enjoyable neighborhoods vs. neighborhoods with chronic constant turnover…

Retain Residents – Restore Neighborhoods

When too much emphasis is put on tourist accommodations, which causes the loss of single family homes and turning them into Short Term Rentals (STR’s), we lose more than a sense of community. For Lincoln County the cost was greater than 2,000 homes sacrificed to provide tourist accommodations. Many single family neighborhoods outside city limits have become hunting grounds for investors intent on creating a resort environment.  We must ask ourselves why we aren’t encouraging community relationships that come with having real neighbors?

November’s election will bring forth measure 21-203. A yes vote will help restore single family homes in neighborhoods outside the cities through a 5-year phase out of STRs. The STRs within cities will still remain. But don’t be fooled into thinking this will sink the county economy. We already have a diverse economy. Isn’t retention of our vital residents working in healthcare, schools, fisheries, science, trades, fire and police important? Let’s value our residents, new and old, for them to have available housing along with sufficient water, food and shelter. Don’t discount the importance of feeling secure and respected – not only for being part of the greater coastal community, but also for the neighborhoods in which we live.

Individuals opposing measure 21-203 want Lincoln County voters to believe that homes converted to STRs are not financially feasible for residents. But residents come from all different financial backgrounds. People living in neighborhoods outside the cities have bore witness to the lifeline that was provided when the Board of Commissioners put a temporary moratorium on licensing new STRs.  What was happening was that a door was opened by County Commissioners for residents, new and old, to buy homes that formerly would have been snatched up and converted to STRs. It happened in my own neighborhood. But it wasn’t long before two former STRs were sold and then bought by full time residents. This benefits not only our neighborhood but the whole county. These are families serving the community in vital jobs and including community volunteering. Putting the needs of residents first strengthens Lincoln County.

Traci Burks, CMA
Unincorporated Lincoln County

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The above editorial is that of the writer and not necessarily reflective of the opinions of the staff and management of NewsLincolnCounty.com.

Fall Term Coming Up at OOCC – Get Ready to Expand Your Minds

Oregon Coast Community College
Newport

College offers one-stop admissions, advising, registration event  Event set for 10 a.m. Tuesday, Sept. 14 at OCCC’s Central County Campus in Newport 

The Fall term at Oregon Coast Community College begins on Sept. 27. Students from all walks of life will gather for the term in a robust lineup of in-person and online course offerings. Some will be beginning (or re-starting) a two-year transfer degree, saving thousands as they pursue an eventual four-year university degree. Others will be working to become a teacher here in Lincoln County, through OCCC’s “teach at the beach” program, created in concert with the Lincoln County School District. Still others will be pursuing a two-year degree in business, a certificate in Early Childhood Education, or one of a number of other disciplines. 

Though the start of the term is just around the corner, there is still time from brand-new and returning students to get registered for the new term.  The last opportunity to get admitted for the fall term, meet with an advisor, and register for classes – all in one convenient event – is coming on Tuesday, Sept. 14. 

The event will be held from 10 a.m. to Noon at OCCC’s Central County Campus, at 400 SE College Way, in Newport. Participants will then be invited to return at 1 p.m. for a new-student orientation, which will run to 3 p.m. 

To learn more, call 541-867-8501.  

Pre-registration for the Sept. 14 event is not required, and all are welcome to attend. Participants are encouraged to bring unofficial transcripts of high school records or other colleges attended, if available.  

Editorial: Saving neighborhoods from mini-motel houses is on the ballot…

Retain Residents Restore Neighborhoods

When too much emphasis is put on tourist accommodations by welcoming the loss of single family homes to STR investment the consequence is high. For Lincoln County the cost is greater than 2,000 homes sacrificed to provide tourist accommodations. Many once single family neighborhoods outside the cities have become stomping grounds for resort-like behavior. We must ask ourselves why we aren’t encouraging community relationships that come with having neighbors?

November’s election will bring forth measure 21-203. A yes vote will help restore single family homes in neighborhoods outside the cities through a 5-year phase out of STRs. The STRs within cities will still remain. Don’t be fooled into thinking this will sink the county economy. We have a diverse economy. Isn’t retention of our vital residents working in healthcare, schools, fisheries, science, trades, fire and police important? Let’s value our residents new and old enough to want them to have available housing. Life’s necessities include water, food and shelter. Don’t discount the importance of feeling secure and respected. These two often come from not only being part of the greater coastal community, but also from the neighborhoods in which we live.

Individuals opposing measure 21-203 want you the Lincoln County voters to believe that homes converted to STRs are not financially feasible for residents. Residents come come from all different financial backgrounds, therefore don’t judge purchasing power. People living in neighborhoods outside the cities have bore witness to the lifeline that was provided when the board of commissioners put a temporary moratorium on licensing new STRs. The truth of what happened during this time is a door was opened for residents new and old to purchase homes that formerly would have been snatched up for STR use. It happened in my own neighborhood. Two former STRs were sold and then bought by full time residents. This benefits not only our neighborhood but the whole county. These are families serving the community in vital jobs and through volunteering. Putting the needs of residents first strengthens the county.

Traci Burks, CMA
Unincorporated Lincoln County

Newport Symphony Season Opener

 

Newport Symphony Season Opener

Homecoming, Reflection, and Celebration

The NSO returns to the Performing Arts Center Stage for the first time since January 2020.

The 2021-22 concert season of the Newport Symphony Orchestra at the Ocean kicks off Saturday, September 18 at 7:30pm and Sunday, September 19 at 2:00pm at the Newport Performing Arts Center with a performance of Mozart’s Rondo for Violin and Orchestra in B flat major. The NSO’s charismatic Concertmaster Casey Bozell is the violin soloist.

Music Director and Conductor Adam Flatt will lead the Orchestra in performances of William Schuman’s “When Jesus Wept” and George Walker’s Lyric for Strings. The concert finale will be Joseph Haydn’s joyful Symphony no. 43, “Mercury.”

Casey Bozell is an energetic performer based in Portland, Oregon. She is an active solo, chamber, and orchestral player. She also holds positions with the Portland Opera Orchestra and Oregon Ballet Theater. Her solo performances include the Newport Symphony, Beaverton Symphony, Linfield Chamber Orchestra, Corban University Orchestra, and the Central Oregon Chamber Orchestra. She has served on the faculty of the Young Musicians and Artists summer camp since 2010 and is a founding member of the Portland-based piano trio Hammers and Bows.

Performances on Saturday include a pre-concert talk by Conductor Adam Flatt at 6:45p.m. Due to the pandemic the post-concert Wine Down receptions supported by Flying Dutchman Winery will not take place at this time.

There are Vaccination and Mask Protocols for attendance at this event. Detailed information available on the symphony website; www.newportsymphony.org

Tickets, $27 and $42 (plus fees) and $10 for students are on sale at the Performing Arts Center box office, by calling 541-265-2787 or online at NewportSymphony.org. The Center is located at 777 West Olive in Newport.

The Angels Ball & Fantasy of the Trees 2021 – Cancelled

The Angels Ball & Fantasy of Trees 2021 CANCELLED
 
Lincoln City, OR – Due to the possibility of spreading Covid 19, the Board of Directors of Angels Anonymous has decided to cancel the 2021 Angels Ball and Festival of Trees scheduled for December 1 through December 4, 2021.

The Angels Ball generates the greatest share of funding needed to make it possible for Angels Anonymous to help residents in the North Lincoln County area with immediate and basic needs. In 2020, even though the Ball was cancelled, donations from members of the community and beyond made it possible to lend a helping hand to those who so desperately needed it. Over 148 families in 2020, many of them victims of the Echo Mountain Fire, were assisted last year, and the need has continued in 2021.

A huge vote of thanks goes out to our sponsors and donors for supporting our mission. Your help has provided a lifeline to literally hundreds of families over the past 23 years.  Lincoln County is still facing the struggle presented by the present pandemic and, as winter approaches, we anticipate that the need for support will continue to be high.

We ask for your support in this coming year and hope to see you all again at the Angel’s Ball in 2022, when we can celebrate the Holidays with renewed hope and the joy of the Angels.

If you wish to make a monetary donation to Angel’s Anonymous call 541-994-2651 or send your donation to Angels Anonymous, PO Box 554, Lincoln City 97367.

Crippled pleasure boat off Waziyata near Waldport

8pm  Report of a boat with four people aboard, trying to get back into port in Waldport.  Earlier info suggested the boat’s motor had failed and that those aboard were trying to paddle their way back into Alsea Bay. 

8:08pm  Latest info is that the boat’s motor has been restarted and that they’re trying to get back to shore.

8:16pm  Boat now entering Alsea Bay.  Things look good!

Never dare Mother Nature to save you….

Devil’s Churn claims another life….

A California tourist tried to swim across Devils Churn south of Yachats Thursday afternoon but he soon disappeared beneath the waves.  Despite a search in earnest for visitor Steve Allen of suburban San Francisco, would-be rescuers couldn’t save him.

A preliminary investigation revealed Steve Allen, 67, of Walnut Creek, California, attempted to jump across Devils Churn and fell in. Others nearby tried to rescue him but were unable to retrieve him from the churning and surging waters.

It’s yet another loss of life in the swirling ocean off the Oregon Coast when visitors, who are not familiar with the often deadly surf and currents, are quickly fatigued and soon disappear amid the currents and cross-currents that are common in south Lincoln County .

Newport Recreation Department reaches out to the Latino Community…

Newport Recreation and Aquatic Center to Host Latinx Community Night

The City of Newport is pleased to partner with Centro de Ayuda in its efforts to become more inclusive and reach out to the Latinx community.  Latinx families are encouraged to come by the Recreation Center on Monday, Sept 27th from 5:30-7:30 pm.  Come see and learn what is offered to support young people and healthy lifestyles!  “We are very excited to offer this opportunity,” states Mike Cavanaugh, Director of Parks and Recreation.  “One of our department goals for this fiscal year is to create a welcoming and inclusive environment at all of our parks and recreation facilities for our community members. The recent Census data reflects that our Latinx population is growing in Newport and we want to make sure that we are meeting the needs of that growing community.” 

The goal of the Latinx Community Night is to reach out to our Latinx population and showcase the Recreation and Aquatic Centers.  Community members are encouraged to explore the facility free of charge during this special event. There will be open swim for families between 6:00 and 7:00 pm and the gyms will be open to shoot hoops and play. Kids can be dropped off at the Child Center for some supervised activities while parents take a tour of the facility. Tour options are either self-guided or you can join a scheduled tour with a staff member.  Translators will be available!  Front desk staff will be available to answer questions about memberships, facility rentals, and more. 

Refreshments will be offered in the multi-purpose room.  People who show proof of their COVID vaccine can enter to win a free annual membership.  Don’t have your vaccine yet?  No problem, the Lincoln County Health Dept will be there with a vaccine clinic.  The first 50 people to get vaccinated will also receive a $50 gift card courtesy of Centro de Ayuda!  You can reserve a dose by registering here https://sugeni.us/WIIW but walk ins are also welcome.   For more information about this event, visit the City of Newport Parks and Recreation Facebook page. 

Tambien en Espanol

La Ciudad de Newport se complace en asociarse con Centro de Ayuda en sus esfuerzos por ser más inclusivos y llegar a la comunidad Latinx. Se anima a las familias latinas a pasar por el Centro de Recreación el lunes 27 de septiembre de 5: 30-7: 30 pm. ¡Venga a verlo y aprenda lo que se ofrece para apoyar a los jóvenes y los estilos de vida saludables! “Estamos muy emocionados de ofrecer esta oportunidad”, afirma Mike Cavanaugh, Director de Parques y Recreación. “Uno de los objetivos de nuestro departamento para este año fiscal es crear un ambiente acogedor e inclusivo en todos nuestros parques e instalaciones recreativas para los miembros de nuestra comunidad. Los datos del censo reciente reflejan que nuestra población de latinos está creciendo en Newport y queremos asegurarnos de que estamos satisfaciendo las necesidades de esa comunidad en crecimiento”.

El objetivo de la Noche Comunitaria Latinx es llegar a nuestra población Latinx y mostrar los Centros Recreativos y Acuáticos. Se anima a los miembros de la comunidad a explorar las instalaciones de forma gratuita durante este evento especial. Habrá natación abierta para las familias entre las 6:00 y las 7:00 pm y los gimnasios estarán abiertos para jugar al baloncesto y jugar. Los niños pueden dejarse en el Centro Infantil para algunas actividades supervisadas mientras los padres recorren las instalaciones. Las opciones de recorrido son autoguiadas o puede unirse a un recorrido programado con un miembro del personal. ¡Habrá traductores disponibles!

Samaritan Pacific Hospital

El personal de recepción estará disponible para responder preguntas sobre membresías, alquiler de instalaciones y más. Se ofrecerán aperitivos ligeros en el salón de usos múltiples. Las personas que muestren prueba de su vacuna COVID pueden ingresar para ganar una membresía anual gratuita. ¿Aún no tienes tu vacuna? No hay problema, el Departamento de Salud del Condado de Lincoln estará allí con una clínica de vacunas. ¡Las primeras 50 personas que se vacunen también recibirán una tarjeta de regalo de $50 cortesía del Centro de Ayuda! Puede reservar una dosis registrándose aquí https://sugeni.us/WIIW, pero también se aceptan visitas sin cita previa. Para obtener más información sobre este evento, visite la página de Facebook de Parques y Recreación de la Ciudad de Newport.

Caution when you’re exiting the Yaquina Bay Bridge on the south end Sunday thru Tuesday nights

Traffic alert in South Beach September 12,13 & 14

The City of Newport has issued an alert that there will be night-time roadway striping on Highway 101 in South Beach this coming Sunday, Monday and Tuesday nights – each night from 7pm to 6am the following day.  There will be lane closures, with flaggers and traffic control. Signage will alert drivers to the single lane traffic ahead.

Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Navigating Life at the Edge….

New Exhibit Opening at the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center

FINDING OUR WAY: Navigating Life at the Edge explores Lincoln County’s shared maritime past.

The Lincoln County Historical Society is excited to announce the opening of our new exhibit FINDING OUR WAY: the Edge on September 17, 2021. Exhibitions staff are looking forward to sharing a fresh look and exciting new research in the main gallery at the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center. FINDING OUR WAY will include new artifacts, photographs, and displays about the culture and history of life along Lincoln County’s coastline and waterways. Visitors will learn more about the challenges and accomplishments of Lincoln County’s early residents presented through a narrative that honors diverse perspectives.

A free public opening reception is currently scheduled for September 17, 2021 from 5:00 to 7:00 pm at the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center. Masks and proof of vaccination are required to attend. Onsite parking is available, and all Historical Society buildings are wheelchair accessible.

Samaritan Pacific Hospital

The Lincoln County Historical Society is a nonprofit organization dedicated to preserving and sharing Central Oregon Coast history. The Pacific Maritime Heritage Center is open Thursday thru Sunday, 11am to 4pm. The Log Cabin Research Library is open Wednesday thru Friday, 11am to 4pm by appointment. The Burrows House will reopen to the public in Fall 2021.

Please visit our website or join us on Facebook or Instagram. 541-265-7509. www.oregoncoasthistory.org

Image Caption: Waves crash on the deck of an identified fishing boat offshore near Newport. Photograph from the Scott Blackman Collection of the LCHS Archives.

New providers welcome students to School Based Health Centers

New providers welcome students to School-Based Health Centers    

     Students returning to Lincoln County schools found new faces waiting for them and it wasn’t just in the classroom. School Based Health Centers (SBHCs) in three of the four high schools have new nurse practitioners providing primary care this year.  SBHCs are a service provided by Lincoln County Health and Human Services. These federally qualified health centers provide physical exams, diagnosis and treatment of minor illnesses, immunizations, mental health screening, and treatment of minor injuries to area students.  Physical and mental health services are delivered by licensed professionals from Lincoln Community Health Center, including nurse practitioners, a registered nurse, and mental health clinicians. Two new nurse practitioners are joining the primary care team this year.   

Susan Speece
Health & Human Services

Susan Speece, FNP, has worked with adolescents before and is looking forward to treating the children at Newport High School on Thursdays and Fridays, and the students in Waldport on Tuesdays and Wednesdays.  “These are my peeps,” the nurse practitioner said enthusiastically. “I’m looking forward to students coming in and serving as a resource for them, no matter what questions they may have. I didn’t have the ability to talk to a healthcare professional at that age, so I think it’s a pretty cool thing,” she added.  Speece has undergraduate degrees in psychology and nursing from Wayne State University in Detroit, and earned a Master’s in Nursing from the University of Detroit Mercy. Corie Charnley came to work for Lincoln County HHS in June of this year and will be a new face at Taft High School on Mondays and Wednesdays. Charnley is a graduate of Oregon Health and Science University (OHSU) where she earned her RN degree, Master’s degree and doctorate. She has worked in primary care in the Portland area, first as part of a street team delivering services to the homeless and later in a clinic setting.  “I’m really looking forward to working with the students,” Charnley said. “What I really like about this age is that they are just starting to build their own autonomy and healthcare is a perfect place to do it. This is how they will learn to be proactive about their health and their bodies and I’m excited to be able to support them in that. Charnley is also pleased that students can receive mental health services at the SBHCs, too. “I think that is fantastic. I came from a clinic that had integrated primary care and mental health. The fact that we can provide those services under one roof is very special. We can get so much more done on their behalf when we’re all able to collaborate,” she added.    

Corie Charnley
Primary Care

Jessica Hubbard, program manager for the SBHCs, said she’s pleased with the team she has in place for this school year. Joining Speece and Charnley is Jason Vang-Erickson, NP, who is the veteran provider among the three. He will see students in Toledo on Thursdays and Fridays.  “I am excited that we have these providers in each of the schools for two days each week, in addition to Crystal Pickner, RN, who spends one day a week in each school. Our primary care team is joined by behavioral health providers and certified medical assistants who are on hand in each location,” she said. 

     As federally qualified health centers, SBHCs offer affordable services and all Lincoln County School District students may utilize them. The presence of these clinics in schools reduces barriers like cost and transportation that might keep children from getting the care they need. To learn more about the SBHCs and other area health services, visit www.lincolncommunityhealthcenter.com.

Nurturing Parenting online class series begins Sept. 20

Nurturing Parenting online class series begins Sept. 20

Lincoln City – Sept. 9, 2021 – When all members of a family operate on the same philosophy, children will feel trust, predictability and consistency. One critical aspect of nurturing children is developing their empathy, which is the focus of a Nurturing Parenting class series designed for families with children ages 0 to 8.

Sponsored by Parenting Success Network and Samaritan Health Services, the 12-week virtual series will be offered on Mondays beginning Sept. 20, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. In the series, parents will learn the art, science, strategies and techniques that promote empathy in children and form the basis of day-to-day family interactions.

Participants must have access to an internet device with camera and microphone. A limited number of touch-screen tablets and hotspots are available for loan.

For information and to register, send an email to hernanj@linnbenton.edu or call 541-497-4358.

 

Vehicles crash near Wakonda Beach

12:01pm  Auto crash near Wakonda Beach.  Lady driver seriously injured.  Car left the road and into a ditch.  Air ambulance will meet up with a ground ambulance at a local airport three miles south of Waldport.

Traffic Crash on Highway 18 milepost 2 – Two miles east of Highway 101

10:14pm  Report of a vehicle crash on Highway 18 about three and a half miles east of Highway 101.  Unknown if any injuries.

10:23pm  Law Enforcement and fire units say they can’t find any sign of a crash which was reported near the fish hatchery.

10:26pm  Firefighters have found the car – partially down an embankment.  Condition of the driver not yet released.

10:30pm  Firefighters still trying to reach those who were involved in the crash.  They say there is only one occupant in the crashed car that went down a very steep drop off.

10:35pm  Lifeflight is on standby if an air ambulance is called for.

10:38pm  Lifeflight has cancelled their capability to fly in rough weather. 

10:42pm  Reports say that the rescue is rather dicey.  The sole victim in the wreck can’t manage to unhinge himself at the wreck side.

Sunsets can sure send interesting messages…

The setting Sun is attacked by cloud hoodlums…Cecille Kennedy photos

“Where’d they go…they just disappeared!!

“Hey, I think I’ve spotted them way down there between those two mountains!”  Cecillia Kennedy photos

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