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Echo Mountain Fire Update – FEMA remains operational in Lincoln City

News Release from Lincoln Co. Sheriff’s Office

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office and Community Services agencies wrapped up the Multi-Agency Resource Coordination Center on the 22nd, 23rd, and 24th. Representatives from FEMA were on site all 3 days to assist citizens with filing a financial assistance claim due to either the Echo Mountain Fire and/or the straight line wind event.

Attendee turnout was very positive for the 3 day event:

Tuesday – 72 households served
Wednesday – 97 households served
Thursday – 76 households served
At the conclusion of the local MARC FEMA representatives will be relocating to the Lincoln City Community Center to co-locate with the American Red Cross to continue assisting community members with filing claims and answering questions.

Lincoln City Community Center
2150 NE Oar Place
8am – 6pm – Friday, Sept. 25 – Sunday, Sept. 27.

Other FEMA representatives are in affected Lincoln County neighborhoods validating damage assessments once they are received and processed for review. If you have filed a claim they may also try to reach you by phone to follow-up with additional questions after their initial damage assessment. If you were impacted by the Oregon Wildfires community members are encouraged to to register with FEMA as quickly as possible either in person, via telpehone or using their on-line application!

Individual Assistance – FEMA
Website: DisasterAssistance.gov/ela
Phone: 1-800-621-3362 (FEMA) or
TY 1-800-462-7585 7 a.m. to 10 p.m. PDT, seven days a week.

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office
Public Information Call Center – 541-265-0621
www.co.lincoln.or.us/echomountainfire
Echo Mountain Fire Financial Assistance webpage – https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement/page/disaster-financial-assistance

Letter to the Editor…judicial race…

Lincoln County Deputy District Attorney supports Pro-Tem Judge Amanda Benjamin

As a Lincoln County Deputy District Attorney, I appear in front of Pro-Tem Judge, Amanda Benjamin, on a daily basis. Without hesitation, Judge Benjamin is perfect in the role. She’s knowledgeable, fair, and even tempered. What the general public doesn’t see is how wise Judge Benjamin is with her use of the resources of Lincoln County and the State of Oregon. There’s only so much to go around, especially in this economy. EVERY decision a judge makes uses resources provided by taxpayers. Should someone be on supervised probation? Should someone be in jail? Should someone receive counseling? Should someone receive treatment? Should someone be hospitalized? The list is endless, but the amount of resources available is not.

As a Lincoln County Deputy DA I appear in front of Judge Benjamin consistently, I am able to see how thoughtful she is in her methodology applied to each person who appears in front of her. She is meticulous and intuitive in her approach. She wants to know as much about the defendant as possible. If this is a repeat offender, what didn’t work last time? Why didn’t it work? What could be done differently this time? What is the defendant receptive to? What resources would best be utilized to correct the behavior?

Every judge should be fair, tough on crime and sympathetic of victims. Judge Benjamin has those qualities. Equally as important, she understands the vast responsibility given to her as a judge to be a wise steward of the public’s money. Accordingly, she has my vote.

Michael Thornicroft
Lincoln County Deputy District Attorney
Newport

High officials struggle to see what they see, know what they know and….

From Multnomah County District Attorney Mike Schmidt

“The controversial charging decision in the Breonna Taylor case has re-opened wounds across our nation, and here locally, by highlighting the glaring inequities entrenched within our criminal justice system. As Multnomah County District Attorney, I continue to dedicate myself to the work of reform.

I am also alarmed and angry after witnessing the violence in downtown Portland on Wednesday night. What started as a peaceful gathering to support the family of Breonna Taylor was overtaken by people who engaged in dangerous and criminal behavior. I am thankful that no Portland police officers or Portland firefighters were injured after a flaming object was thrown and then exploded just inches away from them. There is no justification for a person to ever throw an incendiary device, to set fire to buildings or to engage in other violent and destructive behavior.

I stand against hate and violence. Neither promotes the reform that is being demanded in our community and across the country. My office will always support and defend the right to free speech and the right to peacefully assemble, and we will always condemn violence.

This is a challenging time for our nation and our community locally. This is a time for us to support free speech and to promote public safety.  On Saturday, there will likely be two large gatherings in North Portland. It is never acceptable to engage in violent or destructive behavior. We have already seen too much violence, harm and even death during past demonstrations. For those who are thinking about traveling to Oregon to engage in criminal conduct – our message is clear: Stay away. For people who attend the events: Leave your weapons behind. Don’t give someone who wants to promote violence a platform by engaging with them.

Let’s remember at the end of the day that we are all human with families and friends. We will not always agree, but disagreement on political and societal issues will not be resolved by violence in our streets. Let’s resolve our issues safely and peacefully through dialogue and voting.”

Oregon’s continued recovery from the worst of the Covid-19 attack depends of more bail outs from Uncle Sam

Very uncertain times…due to slow action in Washington DC…

When the Covid-19 viral attack came ashore in the U.S. shortly after the first of the year it got a big D-Day type landing on the West Coast.  The pandemic spread like wild fire forcing businesses to close and families to hold-up in their homes.  Due to insufficient attention to the situation by the Trump Administration the virus spread explosively coast-to-coast.  But – the federal government eventually softened the blast by sending trillions of dollars to state and local governments to head-off what was feared to be an impending total collapse of the United States’ economy.

Fast-forward to today, that money has run out at the local level and there doesn’t appear to be any further federal support on the horizon.

The Oregon Center for Public Policy (OCPP) is loudly ringing the emergency bell so that those who run Washington DC should be put on notice that we’re on the brink of an economic downturn that most people can’t even imagine.  Here’s OCPP’s assessment of what seems to be our desperate state of affairs.  Click here.

Letter to the Editor: Emergency Information Dilemma for the public…

To the Editor:

Public Information Distribution failures during the fires and smoke…

Major kudos to the firefighters, police, emergency services personnel, and all first responders who went far beyond the call of duty during the windstorm, fire conflagrations, and hazardous ash-filled days we just experienced. But how disappointing and shocking that the City of Newport failed to provide information to the public. Even the County’s excellent emails & website information required that people have access to electricity, internet, or smart phones and cell phone service. But electricity was cut, phone lines were down, and mobile phones lost their charge. Many coastal residents were in the dark — literally and figuratively – for days. We sat in our cars with the radio on, turning the knob hither and yon, hoping for news. Or we pulled out our hand-cranked radios stashed away for emergencies.

Radio signals originating from Portland and Eugene, and our own community station, KYAQ, were off the air. So imagine our frustration when there was nothing about the catastrophe being broadcast on the local stations. As far as I can tell, no information was released by the City of Newport in any form, using any media. No reports, no updates, no plans, no words of comfort. The City still hasn’t released a statement about what this community just went through or what it was doing behind the scenes.

Aren’t local AM stations traditionally the source of information during natural disasters and regional emergencies? Don’t they have an obligation to keep the public informed? Our local stations remained on the air, but they played mostly canned music and rarely provided news of substance. How close were the fires? Which roads were still open? Where could people find refuge?

I urge the staff of the City of Newport, Lincoln County, and our local radio stations to use these communication failures as a wake-up call to do better because there will be a next time.

Carla Perry
Newport, Oregon

Voting lines are unhealthy and overly time consuming….

Senator’s Wyden and Merkley

Wyden and Merkley Introduce Bill To End Long, Unreasonable Lines at Polling Places and Restore Voting Rights

Washington, D.C. – Oregon’s U.S. Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley introduced legislation to end hours-long lines at polling places that suppress hundreds of thousands of Americans’ votes, and to restore our Constitutional rights to vote in free and fair elections.

Studies estimate that nearly 3 million voters waited more than 30 minutes to vote in 2018, and that more than 500,000 Americans were denied the ability to vote because of long lines, with Black and Hispanic communities disproportionately impacted.

The People Over Long Lines (POLL) Act would force state and local governments to end these forms of voter suppression. The bill requires states to file public plans detailing how they will ensure voters can cast ballots with waiting times of less than 30 minutes and require audits by the Election Assistance Commission to determine how many voters face longer waits. The bill includes $500 million to help states reduce voter wait times.

 

“Voting shouldn’t be a war of attrition. It is a national disgrace that millions of working Americans, seniors and parents are forced to stand in line for hours just to exercise their God-given right to vote,” Wyden said. “The POLL Act ensures that states are planning ahead so people can cast their ballots quickly, and holds officials accountable for unreasonably long lines.”

“Especially during a global pandemic, no American should be forced to stand in a long line for hours on end to cast their ballot,” said Merkley. “Voting should be accessible, quick, and easy for all. We need to make sure states and local election administrators know that anything less is an unacceptable assault on one of our most sacred constitutional rights.”

The POLL Act would also create a private right of action of $50 for voters forced to wait for longer than 30 minutes, with an additional $50 for every hour after that. Penalties would increase if a court determines long lines were the result of intentional voter suppression or reckless disregard for election plans. 

It is supported by leading voting rights groups, including Stand Up America, Demand Progress, Voter Protection Corps and Fair Fight Action.

Wyden has been a national leader in the fight to make voting more accessible and secure, introducing legislation every congress since 2006 to allow all Americans to vote by mail, and pushing Congress to defend elections against foreign hackers and other interference. 

Read a summary of the bill here and the bill text here.

CLACKAMAS, DOUGLAS, JACKSON, KLAMATH, LANE, LINCOLN, LINN, AND MARION COUNTIES WORKERS MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR DISASTER UNEMPLOYMENT ASSISTANCE

The Oregon Employment Department is announcing the availability of Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) for individuals who became unemployed, had their work hours substantially reduced or are unemployed self-employed individuals as a direct result of the wildfires and straight-line winds that have been taking place since September 7, 2020. They also must not qualify for regular state unemployment insurance (UI), Pandemic Emergency Unemployment Compensation (PEUC), other extension programs, or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) benefits.

Disaster Unemployment Assistance (DUA) is a federal program that provides temporary unemployment assistance benefits to individuals whose employment or self-employment has been lost or interrupted or had their work hours greatly reduced as a direct result of a major disaster. The Oregon Employment Department administers the DUA program for the U.S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, on behalf of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA). Individuals eligible for regular unemployment benefits or Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) are not eligible for DUA.

DUA is available to eligible individuals for weeks of unemployment beginning September 13, 2020. Benefits for this disaster will be available until March 20, 2021, as long as your unemployment continues to be a direct result of the major disaster. You must file the application within 30 days after this announcement date. The deadline for filing a DUA claim related to these fires is October 23, 2020. 

In addition to people who lost their jobs as a direct result of the major disaster, DUA may include individuals who:

  • * were self-employed and prevented from performing such services as a result of the disaster and the work or self-employment was their primary source of income,
  • * were unable to reach their job because of the disaster,
  • * were scheduled to and prevented from beginning work or self-employment in the disaster area,
  • * were unable to work due to injury as a direct result of the disaster, or
  • * became head of household due a death caused by the disaster,
  • * have applied for and used all regular unemployment benefits from any state, or do not qualify for regular unemployment benefits, or extension programs and remain unemployed as a direct result of the disaster.
  • Unemployment is a direct result of the major disaster if the unemployment resulted from:
  • * the physical damage or destruction of the place of employment;
  • * the physical inaccessibility of the place of employment due to its closure by the federal, state, or local government in immediate response to the disaster; or
  • * lack of work, or loss of revenues, if, prior to the disaster, the employer or self-employed business received at least a majority of its revenue or income from an business in the major disaster area that was damaged or destroyed in the disaster or an entity in the major disaster area closed by the federal, state, or local government.

To receive DUA benefits, all required documentation must be turned in when you file or within 21 days from the day your DUA application is filed. You will need to provide supporting documentation, including but not limited to, proof of employment at the time of the disaster, or proof of self-employment at the time of the disaster, and income information for tax year 2019. Specifically, required documentation includes a Social Security number and a copy of the most recent federal income tax form or check stubs, or documentation to support that  you were working or self-employed when the disaster occurred. Documentation for the self-employed can be obtained from banks or government entities, or affidavits from individuals having knowledge of their business.

Affected individuals are encouraged to apply for DUA through the Oregon Employment Department (OED), which will first check if applicants can qualify for state unemployment benefits, PEUC, other extension programs or PUA benefits.

Applications for DUA are available in English and Spanish online at www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster. Your application may be mailed to the address listed below, or submitted online at unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us. Application packets will be available at certain evacuation sites and WorkSource Centers. Please include the weeks you would like to claim in your initial application. More information is available on our public website and social media pages. For additional questions or to request an initial application, please call: 503-570-5000

Contact Information:
Address:
Disaster Unemployment Assistance Unit
875 Union Street NE
Salem, OR 97311

Telephone: 503-570-5000
Additional Information:

www.oregon.gov/EMPLOY/Disaster

Submit your Application Online:

unemployment.oregon.gov/contact-us

Covid-19 Update

               Covid-19 Virus Update

Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 537, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 193 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 31,503.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (2), Clackamas (9), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (22), Jefferson (3), Josephine (4), Klamath (1), Lane (36), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Malheur (22), Marion (17), Multnomah (29), Polk (2), Umatilla (12), Wasco (4), Washington (14), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Sept. 11 and died on Sept. 15 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 533rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 14 and died on Sept. 15 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 534th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Aug. 17 and died on Sept. 19 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 535th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Sept. 1 and died on Sept. 22 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 536th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 3 and died on Sept. 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 537th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 17 and died on Aug. 31 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

NOTE: Updated information is available for Oregon’s 295th COVID-19 death, a 26-year-old man in Yamhill County. The updated death certificate does not list COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or as a significant condition that contributed to his death, and he is no longer considered a COVID-19 related death or case.

It’s been raining for a change…

Fall Storm arrives

This is an important message from the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office on behalf of North Lincoln Fire and Rescue for the properties/homes in the Echo Mountain Fire Complex affected areas.

A cold front moves inland on today increasing winds and bringing significant rainfall to all areas. Strongest south-southwest winds likely between 9 am and 6 pm Wednesday, with gusts 35 to 45 mph – strongest across beaches, coastal headlands, and higher terrain. Showers and perhaps an isolated thunderstorm on Thursday. Total rainfall Wednesday/Wednesday night: 1 to 2 inches for the coastal areas, but 2 to 4 inches for the Willapa Hills and Coast Range. High threat of sneaker waves on Pacific Ocean beaches.

Fire and wind damaged areas may see additional damage during this storm.  If you have damaged or burned trees on your property, contact your insurance agency and a professional tree-faller or arborist. If you see a smoking stump, it is not an emergency.  You can use a hose to extinguish smoldering vegetation or stumps.  Do not call 911 for smoldering vegetation.  It can take several weeks for the rain to fully extinguish the smoldering vegetation.  However, if you see flames due to wind or an actual fire, call 911.

North Lincoln Fire and Rescue

Business Number – 541-996-2233

Non-Emergency Dispatch Number – 541-994-3636

Plan ahead while headed for home…

PLAN AHEAD BEFORE GOING HOME

As evacuation levels change, people affected by the fires are eager to know when it is safe to go home. As conditions may be unknown in an area, it is important that residents follow the advice of local authorities to learn when it is safe to return. Residents should also check road closures and conditions to know the safest way to travel. Check roads by visiting Oregon Dept. of Transportation’s TripCheck.com.

Once local authorities have given the all-clear to re-enter properties, homeowners should take steps to protect themselves and others, when cleaning up after a wildfire. Many dangers may remain, such as ash and fire debris, which can be toxic. 

Staying safe around ashes:

  • If you see ash or a layer of dust, keep children away until it has been cleaned.
  • Cloth face coverings, paper masks or bandanas are not effective at filtering out fine airborne ash, dust or asbestos fibers. N95 or KN95 respirators, if properly fit, tested and worn, can offer protection from airborne particles.
  • Avoid activities that could stir up ash and make it airborne again, like using a leaf blower, dry sweeping, or vacuuming without a HEPA filter.
  • Use rubber gloves when cleaning up ash. Wash any ash off of your body or clothing right away.
  • To clean up ash outdoors: Gently dampen the ash – do not use a pressure washer, which will generate dust before it wets things down. Then use a vacuum with a high efficiency HEPA filter if you have one. If you don’t have a HEPA-equipped vacuum, gently sweep or scoop up the ash.
  • To clean up ash indoors: Use a damp cloth to clean surfaces, a wet mop on floors. Do not use a vacuum to clean up ash unless it has a high efficiency HEPA filter.
  • Turn on an air purifier or ventilation system with a HEPA filter, if you have one, to help remove particles from indoor air.
  • Find more safety tips on the Oregon Dept. of Environmental Quality website.

Making your yard safe:

  • Extinguish hot embers. Check for them in yard debris, rain gutters or crawl spaces, on the roof, and under overhangs and decks.
  • Clear away debris. Move it away from the house to the edge of your home.
  • Check the electric meter. If there is visible damage, don’t turn the breaker on. Call your utility company.
  • Stay clear of electrical wires on the ground. Report them to your utility company.
  • Check the gas meter, gas lines or propane tank. If there is visible damage or if you smell gas, call your local utility or propane company.

Before entering structures: If you have safety concerns, have a qualified building inspector or structural engineer inspect your structures. Don’t enter if you smell gas. Turn off the power before you inspect your structure. Use a flashlight, but turn it on outside because the flashlight battery may produce a spark that can cause a fire.

Entering your structures safely:

  • Check for immediate dangers. This includes remaining fire and fire damage, and wild or domestic animals that may have taken refuge.
  • Check the attic. Embers may have entered through vents.
  • Keep appliances turned off until you have determined the electric meter and electrical lines are undamaged.
  • Discard food that has been exposed to heat, smoke, or soot.
  • Don’t drink or use water from the faucet until emergency officials say it’s okay. Water systems may become polluted if there is post-fire flooding.
  • Take safety precautions for utilities:
    • Electric – If you turn on the breaker and still have no power, contact your utility company.
    • Propane tank or  system – Turn off the valves and call your propane supplier to inspect the system.
    • Heating oil tank system – Call your supplier to inspect it before you use it.
    • Solar electrical system – Have it inspected by a licensed technician to verify the solar panels and wiring are safe.

Documenting Damage and contacting your insurance company: Call your insurance agent. Make a list of the damage and document it with photos and videos. Keep all receipts for repair and cleaning costs.

“Breonna Taylor should be alive today”…Sen. Merkley

Breonna Taylor
Cut down by police spraying her home with bullets.

Oregon’s U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley released the following statement after a grand jury returned its announcement regarding the killing of Breonna Taylor in Louisville, Kentucky:

“Breonna Taylor should be alive today. She’s dead.  She’s dead because of a fundamentally racist system that cheapens her life and the lives of all Black people. Time and again, Black Americans are getting shot by officers because of a racist system in which public safety officials view white community members as the clients and Black community members as the enemy. A system that assumes when responding to Black Americans, force is the first resort instead of the last. A system whose consequences persist, despite the many individual officers who strive to do the right and just thing.

“Today’s indictment falls short of the transparent accountability that the public and Breonna Taylor’s loved ones deserve. I’m glad a police officer is being held accountable for recklessly endangering the lives of people they were supposed to serve, but let’s be clear: Our entire criminal justice enterprise does that every single day. That warrant should never have been issued; all use of no-knock warrants and choke holds must end. The rehiring of officers who break the law or use force without justification must end. Training must be vastly improved. In short, Congress must pass the Justice in Policing Act that I’ve co-sponsored. We need systemic change, and we need it now.

“Breonna Taylor. Say her name.”

SNAP Food Update

OREGONIANS AFFECTED BY THE WILDFIRES GET MORE TIME TO REPORT THE LOSS OF SNAP BENEFITS

The Oregon Department of Human Services (ODHS) has received federal approval to extend the normal 10-day deadline for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) recipients in 20 counties to request replacement of benefits as a result of food lost due to power outages and wildfires that began on Sept. 7.

The extension gives SNAP recipients in Benton, Clackamas, Columbia, Coos, Deschutes, Douglas, Jackson, Jefferson, Josephine, Klamath, Lake, Lane, Lincoln, Linn, Marion, Multnomah, Tillamook, Wasco, Washington, and Yamhill counties until Oct. 7 to apply to replace food purchased with their SNAP benefits.

“Replacing SNAP benefits will help Oregonians provide food for their families so they can focus on recovering from the wildfires,” said Dan Haun, ODHS Self-Sufficiency Programs Director. “We hope that these replacement benefits will help alleviate worries about food and feeding themselves and their families.”

SNAP recipients do not need to visit an office. They can request replacement food benefits by calling their local office and submitting the required information by email, fax or regular mail. Recipients can use either Form DHS 0349D (Affidavit for Nonreceipt or Destroyed Food Stamp Benefits) or submit a signed and dated written request that includes how the food was destroyed, the date it happened, destroyed food items and the amount paid for each item.

Administered by ODHS, SNAP is a federal program that provides food assistance to approximately 1 million eligible, low-income families and individuals in Oregon, including many older adults and people with disabilities. Oregonians in need can apply for benefits, including SNAP, child care, cash assistance and Medicaid. Learn more at https://govstatus.egov.com/or-dhs-benefits. For local resources in your area, such as food or shelter, please call 2-1-1.

And the bad news keeps rolling through towns…

Oregon reports 193 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 537, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 193 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today bringing the state total to 31,503.

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (1), Benton (2), Clackamas (9), Clatsop (2), Columbia (2), Coos (2), Deschutes (2), Douglas (1), Hood River (2), Jackson (22), Jefferson (3), Josephine (4), Klamath (1), Lane (36), Lincoln (1), Linn (2), Malheur (22), Marion (17), Multnomah (29), Polk (2), Umatilla (12), Wasco (4), Washington (14), and Yamhill (1).

Oregon’s 532nd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on September 11 and died on September 15 at Samaritan Albany General Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 533rd COVID-19 death is a 93-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 14 and died on September 15 at Portland Adventist Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 534th COVID-19 death is an 82-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on August 17 and died on September 19 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 535th COVID-19 death is a 75-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on September 1 and died on September 22 in his residence. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 536th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Multnomah County who tested positive on September 3 and died on September 7 at Providence Portland Medical Center. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 537th COVID-19 death is a 95-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on July 17 and died on August 31 in her residence. She had underlying conditions.

NOTE: Updated information is available for Oregon’s 295th COVID-19 death, a 26-year-old man in Yamhill County. The updated death certificate does not list COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or as a significant condition that contributed to his death, and he is no longer considered a COVID-19 related death or case.


Accumulating Funds for Short Term Goals

        Duane Silbernagel, CFP
        Financial Planner

Accumulating Funds for Short-Term Goals
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel, CFP®

Stock market volatility in 2020 has clearly reinforced at least one important investing principle: Short-term goals typically require a conservative investment approach. If your portfolio loses 20% of its value due to a temporary event, it would require a 25% gain just to regain that loss. This could take months or even years to achieve.

So how should you strive to accumulate funds for a short-term goal, such as a wedding or a down payment on a home? First, you’ll need to define “short term,” and then select appropriate vehicles for your money.

Investing time periods are usually expressed in general terms. Long term is typically considered 15 years or longer; mid term is between five and 15 years; and short term is generally five or fewer years.

The basic guidelines of investing apply to short-term goals just as they do for longer-term goals. When determining your investment mix, three factors come into play — your goals, time horizon, and risk tolerance. While all three factors are important, your risk tolerance — or ability to withstand losses while pursuing your goals — may warrant careful consideration.

Example: Say you’re trying to save $50,000 for a down payment on your first home. You’d like to achieve that goal in three years. As you’re approaching your target, the market suddenly drops and your portfolio loses 10% of its value. How concerned would you feel? Would you be able to make up that loss from another source without risking other financial goals? Or might you be able to delay buying your new home until you could recoup your loss?

These are the types of questions you should consider before you decide where to put those short-term dollars. If your time frame is not flexible or you would not be able to make up a loss, an appropriate choice may be lower-risk, conservative vehicles. Examples include standard savings accounts, certificates of deposit, and conservative mutual funds. Although these vehicles typically earn lower returns than higher-risk investments, a disciplined (and automated) saving habit combined with a realistic goal and time horizon can help you stay on course.

The FDIC insures CDs and savings accounts, which generally provide a fixed rate of return, up to $250,000 per depositor, per insured institution. All investments are subject to market fluctuation, risk, and loss of principal. When sold, investments may be worth more or less than their original cost.

Mutual funds are sold by prospectus. Please consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus, which contains this and other information about the investment company, can be obtained from your financial professional. Be sure to read the prospectus carefully before deciding whether to invest.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website: www.duane.wrfa.com
Thank you for your interest.

Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com.

This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. The article was written by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. (Copyright 2020) and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (08/20)

The aftermath is upon us….we hope…

Wildfire Information

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  • Click Here – Weather, Tsunamis, River Levels, Smoke Advisories, Recent Earthquakes, Tides, Vocanic Activity

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