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The Covid-19 virus is still making the rounds…

OHA releases biweekly COVID-19 reports

The COVID-19 Biweekly Data Report, released today, shows a decrease in COVID-19-related cases, hospitalizations and deaths since the previous biweekly period.

Oregon Health Authority (OHA) reported 20,451 new cases of COVID-19 from June 12 to June 25, a 2.8% decrease over the previous biweekly total of 21,038. Over the last six weeks, reported hospitalizations and deaths have increased slightly.

During the two-week period of June 12 to June 25, test positivity was 13.6%, up from 12.3% in the previous two-week period.

Today’s COVID-19 Biweekly Outbreak Report shows 193 active outbreaks in care facilities, senior living communities and congregate care living settings with three or more confirmed COVID-19 cases or one or more COVID-19-related deaths.

Summer arrived a bit late, but the bears are still “out there”

Bear at the back door…
Adam Denlinger photo

Fish and Wildlife Officers report that Spring came a little late along the Oregon Coast.  But none-the-less in the last week of June the bears started to make a showing in the forests and a few front porches.

The coastal Black Bear have been out in numbers gorging on Salmon Berries, Huckleberries, Black and Salmon berries.  But it won’t be long before the wildlife start making the rounds of neighboring garbage cans.  And if they’re not properly sealed you get quite a mess.  Soon the bears will be grabbing fish in the creeks, competing for bird seed hanging on the front veranda and unfinished dog bowls on the porch.

If you see a bear, alert your neighbors, if you have any.  Get on the phone and tell your neighbors that the bears are on the prowl.  ODFW recommends electrified fencing around your property.  The bears hate’em.

If you’re confronted by a bear stand up straight but don’t look the bear in the eyes.  Back up.  Back away.  If there are bear cubs nearby carefully back out and away from them too.  Always give bears a viable escape route.  Never run away from a bear.  WALK deliberately and calmly.  If the bear comes at you, fight back, scream, shout – take aggressive stances.  Throw sticks, rocks.  Make sure your aim is good and hope the bear thinks you are tall and strong enough to hurt him. 

Logsden Community Club achieves 60th year with the Community Picnic & Bluegrass Concert

Refurbishing the Logsden Community Center

Logsden Community Club Celebrates 60th Year with Community Picnic and Bluegrass Concert

June 28, in Celebration of its 60th anniversary the Logsden Community Club is holding a family-friendly down-home community picnic on Saturday, July 16, from noon to 4pm. Admission will be $10 per family or 5$ per individual and free to members of the Logsden Community Club.

Bring your picnic lunch and munch away while listening to the blue grass sounds of Banjo Bobby Llewellyn and Friends. The band made up of local bluegrass pickers plays bluegrass and country music on traditional acoustic instruments, including stand-up doghouse bass, banjo, guitar, fiddle, mandolin and dobro. 

Forgot to pack a lunch? Not to worry. Hot dogs, burgers, and soft drinks will be for sale on site. There will be games for the children, and that’s not all! Browsing is encouraged at the silent auction and there will be a 50/50 raffle.

The Logsden Community Club is a non-profit organization made up of a group of civic minded friends and neighbors who strive to enhance the quality of life in the area. The organization donates a portion of its’ profits back to the community including the Siletz Valley Fire District, Bright Horizons Therapeutic Riding Center, Food Share of Lincoln County and more. Club membership meets for monthly potlucks often featuring educational presentations and other times for fun and socialization.

Recently the Community Club members worked together to make Logsden recognized as a Firewise Community, to help combat the effects of drought conditions and prevent spread of fires that threaten the area. In addition to being recently refurbished the building is designated as a Red Cross receiving center in the event of a natural disaster.

Membership dues, rental fees, grants and fundraisers keep the facility open and available for community and family gatherings. The Fall Harvest Festival, the annual fundraiser that features fruits and vegetables from the fall harvest, canned goods, homemade wares, and an abundance of delightful baked goods, brings people from far and wide.

Located at the junction of the Logsden/Siletz Highway and Moonshine Park Road, the Community Club is situated on a historic site where the local school once sat. Today’s facility, built in the 1980s, is available to rent for local gatherings including weddings, birthdays, classes, family reunions and other events. The facility also features a commercial kitchen. The cost is nominal and members of the club qualify for a reduced rate. Cost for club membership is $25 per year for those living in the greater Logsden area.

We invite you to join us to celebrate the beauty of a July summer day with family and friends!  For further information visit the Logsden Community Club Facebook Page, or contact Laurie Schmit at logsden1@gmail.com.

Keep the beaches clean, folks….keep’em clean!!

Lincoln County Unites to Keep Beaches Clean during the Fourth of July Holiday

Organizations including local and County government, waste haulers, nonprofits, community groups, and Oregon Parks and Recreation collaborate to protect local beaches

Lincoln County, OR – The Fourth of July holiday represents the most significant single-day contribution of litter and marine debris on Oregon’s beaches – often with increased litter and debris in the days leading up to and following the holiday. Debris from fireworks and holiday celebrations poses significant ingestion and entanglement risks for marine life. That’s why several partners including local and county government, waste haulers, environmental nonprofits, community groups, and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department have teamed up to host a series of Fifth of July Cleanups throughout Lincoln County.

The group will host more than a dozen cleanups on July 5th. Most of the cleanups will take place from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. IN WALDPORT, CHECK-IN SITES ARE GOVERNOR PATTERSON STATE PARK & THE ALSEA BAY BRIDGE INTERPRETIVE CENTER/WALDPORT MUSEUM. Visit this link: https://x.gldn.io/Surfrider_Newport_Oregon

“Even though fireworks are not allowed on Oregon beaches, every year our beaches are littered with fireworks shells and other trash generated by holiday celebrations,” said Bri Goodwin with Surfrider Foundation. “Until folks stop littering, we will continue to rely on volunteers to clean our beaches before the

trash gets washed to sea or ingested by wildlife.”

Volunteers are asked to bring their own buckets and gloves, but supplies will be provided for those that do not have their own.  Steve Cook & Paul Seitz invite you to join us!  The colorful barrels were painted by students from Waldport Middle School.  Our friends from Dahl Disposal will be picking up all collected trash, too!

WALDPORT’S ANNUAL INDEPENDENCE WEEKEND FIREWORKS SHOW IS SUNDAY, JULY 3rd over The Alsea Bay.  Thank you to the City of Waldport!
Please enjoy the upcoming 4th of July holiday responsibly and thank you for making our community great!

“This effort is our coastal character in action – mindful community members coming together to make a difference in Lincoln County and beyond,” said Paul Seitz with the Lincoln County Solid Waste District. “This unique collaboration has drawn on the strengths and expertise of so many groups that are coming together across sectors to keep our beaches clean.”

The groups involved in this effort are: Lincoln County Solid Waste District, the cities of Depoe Bay, Lincoln City, Newport, Siletz, Toledo, Waldport, and Yachats; Dahl Disposal Service; North Lincoln Sanitary Service, Thompson’s Sanitary Service, Lincoln County, Surfrider Foundation, Explore Lincoln City, the Waldport Chamber of Commerce, SOLVE, Rotary Club of Newport, Roads End Improvement Association, Lincoln City Parks & Recreation, and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

THANK YOU STEVE COOK!

YAG is back with a bang -don’t forget your ear-muffs!!

The Yachats Arts Guild (YAG) is “Back with a Bang!” and having a July 1st- July 4th 10a-4p Art Show just in time for all of the festivities here during the 4th of July including Yachats LaDeeDa Parade which is also back this year!!
 
Our show will be located at Yachats Commons in the Main Purpose Room, as well as Room 8 located at 441 Hwy 101N Yachats.
YAG first started in 2007 and still has some of the original artist members. We’ve grown now to 35 local artists and consist of painters in different mediums, stained glass, mixed media, jewelry and more!  
 
We are sponsored by Polly Plumb Productions a non-profit organization.
 
We are also recruiting new members and you can pick up a brochure while you are visiting our show. You can also go to https://yachatsartsguild.org/membership-info/ for more information.

Summer’s here…get the most out of it…

No cell phone, no TV, no radio, loverly alone…just the gurgle of the Alsea River…
Ken Gagne photo

Bri Goodwin, Surfrider Foundation, bgoodwin@surfrider.org, 541-655-0236
Pau Seitz, Lincoln County Solid Waste District, pseitz@co.lincoln.or.us, 541-574-1

Lincoln County Unites to Keep Beaches Clean during the Fourth of July Holiday

Organizations including local and County government, waste haulers, nonprofits, community groups, and Oregon Parks and Recreation collaborate to protect local beaches

The Fourth of July holiday represents the most significant single-day contribution of litter and marine debris on Oregon’s beaches – often with increased litter and debris in the days leading up to and following the holiday. Debris from fireworks and holiday celebrations poses significant ingestion and entanglement risks for marine life. That’s why several partners including local and county government, waste haulers, environmental nonprofits, community groups, and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department have teamed up to host a series of Fifth of July Cleanups throughout Lincoln County.

The group will host more than a dozen cleanups on July 5th. Most of the cleanups will take place from 11:00 am to 1:00 pm. IN WALDPORT, CHECK-IN SITES ARE GOVERNOR PATTERSON STATE PARK & THE ALSEA BAY BRIDGE INTERPRETIVE CENTER/WALDPORT MUSEUM. Visit this link: https://x.gldn.io/Surfrider_Newport_Oregon

“Even though fireworks are not allowed on Oregon beaches, every year our beaches are littered with fireworks shells and other trash generated by holiday celebrations,” said Bri Goodwin with Surfrider Foundation. “Until folks stop littering, we will continue to rely on volunteers to clean our beaches before the trash gets washed to sea or ingested by wildlife.”

Lincoln County Unites to Keep Beaches Clean during the Fourth of July Holiday

Beaches are forever rally!

Organizations including local and County government, waste haulers, nonprofits, community groups, and Oregon Parks and Recreation collaborate to protect local beaches

Lincoln County, OR – The Fourth of July holiday represents the most significant single-day contribution of litter and marine debris on Oregon’s beaches – often with increased litter and debris in the days leading up to and following the holiday. Debris from fireworks and holiday celebrations poses significant ingestion and entanglement risks for marine life. That’s why several partners including local and county government, waste haulers, environmental nonprofits, community groups, and the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department have teamed up to host a series of Fifth of July Cleanups throughout Lincoln County. 

The group will host more than a dozen cleanups on July 5th. Most of the cleanups will take place from 11 am to 1 pm. Visit https://x.gldn.io/Surfrider_Newport_Oregon to find a cleanup near you. 

“Even though fireworks are not allowed on Oregon beaches, every year our beaches are littered with fireworks shells and other trash generated by holiday celebrations,” said Bri Goodwin with Surfrider Foundation. “Until folks stop littering, we will continue to rely on volunteers to clean our beaches before the trash gets washed to sea or ingested by wildlife.”

Volunteers are asked to bring their own buckets and gloves, but supplies will be provided for those that do not have their own. 

And now a detailed “look-see” at how Washington DC is helping Oregon maintain its equilibrium

News from Rep. Gomberg

Wages Going Up, Checks in the Mail, and Concerns About Our Supreme Court

 

Dear Neighbors and Friends,

Last Friday, the US Supreme Court drove a wedge deep into the divide that has plagued our nation all too much in recent years.

I often write in these reports that we need to seek and focus on common ground. But actions at the national level are exacerbating our differences.

In overturning the 50 year old ruling that gave women the right to reproductive choices including abortion, the court also signaled interest in overturning rulings protecting same-sex marriage, gay sex and the use of contraceptives. Justice Thomas stated, “in future cases, we should reconsider all of this Court’s substantive due process precedents.”

Because reproductive health access in Oregon is governed by laws enacted by our state legislature, rather than by a court’s interpretation of the state constitution, a sudden change to those policies is unlikely. Oregon state law, updated in 2017, allows for late-term abortion, requires private medical insurance and state Medicaid to cover abortion, and codifies the right to gender-affirming care, among other protections. 

Still, the landmark decision issued Friday in Washington, D.C., will affect Oregon. Abortion rates in this state have been falling for 30 years. Now they will increase. Reproductive health care providers have been preparing for months for an influx of patients from states, including neighboring Idaho, where doctors will face prison time for providing abortions. The Guttmacher Institute has estimated that Oregon will experience a 234% increase in those seeking abortions arriving from out of state, especially from Idaho.

The Supreme Court’s overturning of Roe v. Wade on Friday sets off a cascade of antiabortion legislation that will affect roughly half the country.

A majority of Americans, and more than 2/3 of Oregonians believe these most personal decisions regarding health and reproduction should be made by a woman – in consultation with her family, physician, or faith advisors as appropriate – and not by politicians. On Saturday morning, I joined a small group in Newport waving signs on the sidewalk near City Hall. The reaction of people driving by, honking their agreement or gesturing in defiance, reflected those statistics.

I left the event, saddened by the divide but proud as ever to be an Oregonian.

Legal Abortion Status in the US

 

More than 236,000 Oregon families will be receiving a $600 payment this week under a new state law that aimed to aid low-income workers. 

Direct deposits or paper checks are going to people who lived in Oregon for the last six months of 2020 and claimed the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC), a tax break for low-income workers, on their 2020 taxes. Single people who claimed the credit earned less than $16,000, while married couples with three or more children earned less than $57,000. 

More than 136,000 Oregon taxpayers will see $600 deposited in their bank accounts before July 1, while more than 99,000 more will find paper checks in their mailboxes over the next week. They’ll also receive letters explaining the payment. 

When this proposal was debated earlier this year, I said that the program was imperfect because it focused on families that qualified and needed help two years ago and not today. Two years ago was a lifetime ago, I said. Two years ago we had some of the highest unemployment in the state in our district and now there are jobs for anyone who wants one. Wages for those jobs are higher than ever. And of course, inflation now is changing lives and incomes dramatically. I worry for families in need now who will not qualify because they were not in as much need two years ago. And I worry for residents like seniors on fixed incomes who did not qualify for EITC and so won’t receive the payment.

But at the same time, we have to acknowledge that most people hurting two years ago are still hurting. And we have to acknowledge the shocking number of people here in our own local district who qualify for low-income support. Fourteen percent of the workers in House District 10 will receive this payment. That’s one in seven. And so while the measure was not perfect, it certainly would help in some small way, a lot of people here.

Residents of rural counties will receive these payments at roughly twice the rate of our urban counties. The measure passed 41-16 with bipartisan support. You can watch my comments during debate here.

For more information, the Department of Revenue has a frequently asked questions site at the Revenue OTAP webpage or you can email onetime.assistancepayment@dor.oregon.gov .

Stimulus Payments Info

 

Starting July 1st, minimum wage workers in Oregon will see an increase in pay.

In 2016, Oregon lawmakers created a three-tiered minimum wage. Employers will pay more in larger cities and less in rural communities. That means while minimum wage workers will see a new rate of $13.50 an hour across our district, employees in the Portland area will get an increase to $14.75. Those are both increases of 75 cents per hour. Meanwhile, the minimum wage in the most rural parts of the state will jump by 50 cents to $12.50 an hour.

The Oregon Employment Department says roughly five percent of Oregon’s hourly workers earn the minimum wage. Oregon’s rate remains among the highest minimum wages in the nation. But what we know across our own part of Oregon is that most wages are running well ahead of the statutory minimum. The question for most employers or employees is whether changes in the minimum will translate into adjustments for all workers.

Oregon Minimum Wage Map

 

I often make reference to the state boards and commissions I serve on: the Ocean Science Trust, Commission on Senior Services, Seismic Policy Advisory Commission, and Innovation Council. Perhaps you would like to serve on a state advisory board too.

There are currently 150 boards and commissions that are actively recruiting new members including two new councils – the Emergency Preparedness Advisory Council and the Local Government Emergency Management Advisory Council – both of which were created in 2021 with our emergency management reorganization bill. 

The list ranges from Accountancy or Alcohol and Drug Policy to the Wine Board and Youth Development. You can play a role in Boiler Rules, Mortuaries and Cemeteries, Motorcycle Safety, or Truth in Labeling. Or perhaps you are interested in Ocean Policy, the Ethics Commission who oversee public officials, Home or Residential Care of seniors in assisted living, or the Transportation Commission who prioritize highway work across Oregon.

A full list of boards and commissions with one or more vacancies is available here. Public members of the boards and commissions are people who may not have regular, ongoing experience in a specific topic area, but a general interest in a particular board or commission’s work arena.

These public bodies usually offer an in-person or virtual meeting option. In most cases, per diem is available to compensate volunteers for travel or time away from work. To submit an application, please visit the state boards and commissions website and follow the instructions to apply. Read more about the process here.


 

As summer approaches and temperatures rise, please remember that algae blooms can form on bodies of water in hot weather.

Some blooms can cause serious illness or death in pets, livestock and wildlife. These toxins can also make people sick and sometimes cause rashes or irritation. Not all blooms are harmful but you can’t tell if an algae is toxic just by looking at it. 

Don’t go into water that looks foamy, scummy, thick like paint, pea-green, blue-green or brownish red. A good rule of thumb for you and your pet is: when in doubt, stay out!

While many popular water bodies in Oregon have health advisories issued when a blue-green algal bloom is discovered, there is no regulatory requirement to issue health advisories for contaminated water. The best thing you can do is learn what to look for. You can do that online here.

Algae Bloom

 

Take three minutes this week and check to see if the state is holding money for you that you didn’t know existed or forgot to claim.

Every year, companies, nonprofits, and government agencies across the state are required to report and remit unclaimed property to the Oregon State Treasury. This includes things like uncashed checks, unreturned deposits, forgotten bank accounts, and abandoned safe deposit boxes.

Last year, the Oregon State Treasury launched a new website to help return unclaimed property to Oregonians across the state. Since the program launched, more than $13.3 million has been returned to nearly 11,000 claimants.

If you’d like to check to see if you have unclaimed property, visit unclaimed.oregon.gov, search for your name, and select “Claim.” One of my office staff was surprised to find they had a $75 rebate check they didn’t know about, so you never know what you might find!

Oregon Unclaimed Property

 

It was a typical Saturday in the District. I started with a trip to Newport where, as I mentioned above, I joined the Women’s Rights gathering at City Hall. I then crossed the street to visit the Farmer’s Market with a shopping list from Susan. From Newport, I traveled to Siletz for the Fire Hall open house. Since the events of 2020 Labor Day, fire response has become very personal to me. I wanted to stop to support and celebrate those remarkable local first responders who run toward danger when the rest of us are running away.

From Siletz, I came back to Lincoln City for the PRIDE gathering at the Cultural Center, dropped by the kite festival (Susie and I were not performing this year), and then went back to Newport for a fundraiser for youth programs at the Yacht Club that included a brief but delightful sail around the bay.

We finished out the long day on our deck, enjoying the sultry weather and clear sky with Chinook Winds fireworks in the distant background.

Monday (today) I’m focused on a three public meetings regarding the proposed Amazon cable landing near Pacific City. (See last week’s report for details). The last meeting runs from 4-6 pm at the Kiwanda Community Center.

Tuesday I’ll be on the air with KBCH and KTIL radio in the morning, and then presenting to the legislative Disaster Recovery Authority Work Group meeting. At noon I speak to the Association of Counties and League of Cities about broadband – or the lack thereof – on the Coast.

Wednesday I’m visiting Camp Westwind at the mouth of the Salmon River. Thursday and Friday are filled with individual meetings and a ribbon cutting at Fishing Rock Eatery in Depoe Bay. Saturday is the opening of Art, Oysters, and Brew in Toledo. And Sunday, I’ll be at a fundraiser for our Newport Symphony at the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center. That takes us to July 4th which is packed with a parade in Yachats, a public symphony in Newport, and fireworks over the Bay.

Please enjoy safely our national independence. All that we have, we value, and we sustain is well worth celebrating.

Warm Regards,

DG Signature

Representative David Gomberg
House District 10


email: Rep.DavidGomberg@oregonlegislature.gov
phone: 503-986-1410
address: 900 Court St NE, H-480, Salem, OR, 97301
website: http://www.oregonlegislature.gov/gomberg


All five Samaritan Hospitals are recognized for exceptional stroke care

Samaritan Pacific Hospital- on the grow…

(Corvallis, Oregon – June 24, 2022) All five Samaritan Health Services hospitals in Benton, Lincoln and Linn counties have earned recognition by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association for providing exceptional stroke care.

The Get With The Guidelines-Stroke awards recognize commitment to providing the most appropriate stroke treatment following nationally recognized guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence. “These awards represent a tremendous amount of teamwork among our staff and with local emergency responders to provide coordinated stroke care to save brain tissue,” said Sarah Vincent, RN, coordinator with the Samaritan Stroke Program. “Our greatest reward is serving our patients. That’s why we’re committed to turning treatment guidelines into lifelines.”

The Samaritan hospitals and awards received are:
 * Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Stroke Honor Roll and Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.
* Samaritan Albany General Hospital – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award.
* Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Stroke Honor Roll and Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.
* Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital – Stroke Silver Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.
* Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Stroke Honor Roll and Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.
*  To qualify for the awards, hospitals must meet specific goals in comprehensive stroke care and meet quality measures developed to minimize the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or tenecteplase. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, the drug has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability. 
* Target: Stroke Honor Roll is when a hospital achieves door-to-needle time within 60 minutes for at least 75% of applicable patients.
* Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll aims to ensure patients with type 2 diabetes receive the most up-to-date, evidence-based care when hospitalized with a stroke. The award brings attention to this critical high-risk population.

Samaritan Albany General Hospital has been a Primary Stroke Center since 2019, and Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center has been a Primary Stroke Center since 2012.  The Samaritan Stroke Services team of specialists work together from the beginning of a patient’s visit and follow their care throughout the patient’s time in the hospital. The team helps stop the stroke to reduce the patient’s disabilities from the stroke.

For more information, call 541-768-6737, email SHSstrokeservices@samhealth.org or visit samhealth.org/Stroke.

Vehicle crash on Logsden Road east of Siletz

7;39pm  A vehicle loaded with teen-agers were headed out Logsden Road from Siletz when it crashed.  It’s not been revealed if the teens were behaving themselves before the crash.

7:51 pm  After assessing injuries to the occupants of the car it’s been determined that a medical helicopter is not needed.  Ground transportation was waived off….likely no bad injuries.

Siletz Valley Grange to sparkle out loud very soon!

The Siletz Valley Grange is raffling off a quilt donated by Grange Member Betty Wilson.  Betty is a member of the Oregon Coast Quilters Guild, Veterans Quilt Project. The group meets at the Grange Hall once a month to assemble Veterans Quilts, often making presentations to Veterans.  This quilt was made by Betty Wilson and was quilted by Joanne Sedlacek.  Tickets are $5 each.  Tickets are for sale at the Siletz Valley Grange Farmers Market (224 Gaither Street; Siletz) on Tuesdays from 10 am to 2 pm, or by contacting Michelle Schaffer at 541-270-2864.  The winning ticket will be drawn at the Siletz Community Garage Sale on September 10, 2022 at 3 pm.

Lots goin’ on…for the good of families in the Logsden area…

Logsden Community Club Celebrates 60th Year with
Community Picnic and Bluegrass Concert

June 27, 2022, Logsden, OR –In Celebration of its 60th anniversary the Logsden Community Club is holding a family-friendly down-home community picnic on Saturday July 16 from noon to 4pm. Admission will be $10 per family or 5$ per individual and free to members of the Logsden Community Club.
Bring your picnic lunch and munch away while listening to the blue grass sounds of Banjo Bobby Llewellyn and Friends. The band made up of bluegrass pickers plays bluegrass and country music on traditional acoustic instruments, including stand-up doghouse bass, banjo, guitar, fiddle, mandolin and dobro. 
Forgot to pack a lunch? Not to worry. Hot dogs and soft drinks will be for sale on site. There will be games for the children, and that’s not all! Browsing is encouraged at the silent auction.

The Logsden Community Club is a non-profit organization made up of a group of civic minded friends and neighbors who strive to enhance the quality of life in the area. The organization donates a portion of its’ profits back to the community including the Logsden Rural Fire Department and Bright Horizons Therapeutic Riding Center. Club membership meets for monthly potlucks often featuring educational presentations and other times for fun and socialization. Recently the Community Club members worked together to make Logsden recognized as a Firewise Community, to help combat the effects of drought conditions and prevent spread of fires that threaten the area. In addition to being recently refurbished the building is designated as a Red Cross Center in the event of natural disasters.

Membership dues, rental fees, grants and fundraisers keep the facility open and available for community and family gatherings. The Fall Harvest Festival, our annual fundraiser that features fruits and vegetables from the fall harvest, canned goods, home-made wares, and an abundance of delightful baked goods, brings people from far and wide.Located at the junction of the Logsden/Siletz Highway and Moonshine Park Road, the Community Club is situated on a historic site where the local school once sat. Today’s facility, built in the 1980s, is available to rent for local gatherings including weddings, birthdays, classes, family reunions and other events. The facility also features a commercial kitchen. The cost is nominal and members of the club qualify for a reduced rate. Cost for membership is $25 per year.

For further information contact Laurie Schmit at logsden1@gmail.com.

Notes from The Bay

The Newsletter of Siletz Bay Music Festival
June 2022
For those who have asked, or have been wondering, Yaki has been working hard to finalize programming so we could get information to you about this year’s fall Festival before tickets go on sale. So here it is!
TICKETS FOR THE 2022 SILETZ BAY MUSIC FESTIVAL WILL GO ON SALE JULY 1st.
They will be available on the website at siletzbaymusic.org

In spite of skyrocketing costs for everything, everywhere, ticket prices for Siletz Bay Music Festival concerts will remain basically the same as last year with a couple of exceptions: the ticket price for the Opening Night Gala has been raised so it can be a true gala opening to celebrate Mei-Ting Sun’s tenth year playing for Siletz Bay; due to rising food costs, the ticket price for Musical Tapas has been raised as well.Costs of tickets for chamber, jazz and orchestral performances will remain the same as the past three years. In addition, student ticket priceshave been added to most concerts to encourage the youth of the community to hear more music.

Many fans of the festival have been attending for years and over time have learned the language we use when talking about the various concerts on the program. But others, newer to the festival have asked, “What do you mean by Tapas? And what kind of concert is Welcome to the Club? Following are some program notes to help you navigate the waters of Siletz Bay Music Festival concerts.

These are thumbnail sketches. Complete program information will be available when tickets go on sale.

GALA OPENING NIGHT – MEI-TING SUN RECITAL
9/2, 7:30pm at Lincoln City Cultural Center
Tickets: adults $40 / students $15
The Gala Opening Night reception and recital will celebrate Mei-Ting Sun for his tenth year playing at Siletz Bay Music Festival. The romantic program features the music of Schumann and Brahms. Light bites and beverages are included in the ticket price.A SATURDAY SOIREE
9/3, 7:30pm at Lincoln City Cultural Center
Tickets: adults $25 / students $10
This classical chamber concert features newlyweds, Asi Matathias and Tosca Opdam, returning after a long Covid hiatus; Mimi Jung and Michelle Chow return as well. In addition, SBMF is excited to have renowned pianist William Wolfram debut with the festival.MUSICAL TAPAS
9/4, 4:00pm at Lincoln City Cultural Center

Tickets: $65
Tapas are delectable bits of edible goodies made famous in Spain. Musical Tapas is a program comprised of delectable bits of musical goodies played by festival chamber musicians. They work with artistic director Yaki Bergman to partner in interesting combinations and offer their own ideas for the music they want to play. The audience is delighted by the combination of musical and edible treats.SIGHTS AND SOUNDS
9/5, 7:30pm at Lincoln City Cultural Center

Tickets: adults $25 / students $10
Something new for Siletz Bay Music Festival! In conjunction with the Cultural Center, this classical chamber concert will feature local artists creating original works in real time as they are inspired by the music and our musicians on stage. With selections by Grieg, Chopin and Brahms, the evening should provide a feast for the eyes and ears.

A MUSICAL FEAST
9/6, 7:30pm at Lincoln City Congregational Church
Tickets: FREE
It has become a tradition for Siletz Bay Music Festival to provide a chamber concert at the beautiful Congregational Church free of charge to one and all. An extraordinary evening of music, this concert features the return of festival favorite Ken Peplowski playing classical clarinet. There are a finite number of seats so come early to ensure yours.

MUSIC ON THE BAY – SILETZ COMES TO YAQUINA
9/7, 7:30pm at Doerfler Family Theater, Newport
Tickets: adults $25 / students $10
The Doerfler Family Theater in Newport’s Pacific Maritime and Heritage Center provides the perfect setting with the Yaquina Bay and bridge as the backdrop, as well as the perfect piano, a 1918 Steinway donated by Frank and Michelle Harris Geltner. The rich program includes Sonata No. 2 ‘Poem Mystique’ by Newport’s own Ernest Bloch played by William Wolfram and Asi Matathias.

WELCOME TO THE CLUB
9/8, 7:30pm at Lincoln City Cultural Center
Tickets: adults $25 / students $10
This fun and informal night of classic and contemporary jazz and cabaret pairs long-time favorite Ken Peplowski on clarinet, saxophone and microphone with last year’s popular newcomer, vocalist Karla Harris, as well as cabaret performers Ron Spivak and Steve Ross, and the SBMF rhythm section led by Randy Porter on piano, Dave Captein on bass and Jason Palmer on drums.

BENEFIT DINNER – “NEW YORK NEW YORK, HERE I COME!”
9/10, 6:00pm at Lincoln City Cultural Center
Tickets: $125
The premiere Siletz Bay Music Festival fundraising event will feature a formal catered dinner and entertainment by Steve Ross, ‘the Crown Prince of New York Cabaret,’ with a little help from his friends, Karla Harris, Ken Peplowski, Ron Spivak and the SBMF rhythm section. Who says fundraising can’t be fun?

BEETHOVEN – A DOUBLE BILL
9/11, 7:30pm at B’nai B’rith Camp, Otis  

Tickets: adults $40 / students $15
The beautiful grounds of the B’nai B’rith Camp provide the setting for the first night of orchestral music and the return of Mei-Ting Sun soloing on Beethoven’s ‘Emperor’ concerto. His 7th Symphony will round out the all-Beethoven night of music.

SOUNDS OF AMERICA
9/12, 4:00pm at B’nai B’rith Camp, Otis

Tickets: adults $40 / students $15
What could exemplify ‘Sounds of America’ more than Native American pow wow / hip hop music, classical jazz, and a tribute to Stephen Sondheim? Siletz Tribal members Fish Martinez and Kunu Bearchum will join the Siletz Bay Music Festival orchestra for an unforgettable afternoon of music.

Photo Credits: The Photography Studio.    
“Bringing multi-genre world class music performed by outstanding musicians to the Central Oregon Coast; to reach across race, culture, age, social and economic barriers, to uplift and educate all people seeking extraordinary musical experiences.”
DONATE TO SILETZ BAY MUSIC FESTIVAL
Our programs are supported in part by the following organizations: 
For more information about Siletz Bay Music Festival please see www.siletzbaymusic.org, email info@siletzbaymusic.org,or call (541) 264-5828.

Smoke reportedly coming from a residence south of Lincoln City

5:10pm  A yard is full of smoke at a home at 2085 SE Hemlock Lane in Lincoln City, south of Siletz Bay Park.  The area is south of Lincoln City just northeast of Highway 101 and Drift Creek to the southeast.

5:22pm  Firefighters on scene say it’s a burn pile and is contained.

Smoke roiling up from a residence in Newport

4:53pm  Newport firefighters are arriving on scene of what might be a major house fire at 317 Northwest 56th Street.

4:59pm  Reports say there is smoke coming from a shed on the property.  No word yet on the cause.

5:02pm  The neighborhood is immediately east of Yaquina Head.

5:09pm  The backyard burn has been extinguished.

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