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County Public Information Officer Casey Miller files for County Commissioner to replace retiring Commissioner Doug Hunt

Casey Miller
Filing for County Commissioner seat

County Commissioner Candidate for Position #1, Casey Miller, has launched a countywide survey and has articulated his campaign themes. His website is: www.caseymillercommissioner.com

Miller’s core themes include customer service, communications and community engagement, emergency preparedness and what he calls a “thriving community” which includes subjects such as housing, physical and mental health, economic development and other topics.

“I may have put the cart before the horse by immediately launching a countywide survey,” said Miller. “But Traditional surveys and micro surveys will be a permanent theme of my campaign and my vision for more community engagement with our citizens should I be elected.  A constant feedback loop with the community is standard operating procedure for my goal to modernize Lincoln County’s governmental communications outreach.”

A notable advantage for Miller in the candidate lineup is his 13 years of service to the Citizens of Lincoln County as the Commissioner’s Public Information Officer.  During his tenure he has seen many policies that have possibly fallen short of their potential to reach a broader community. The County Commissioners Office has not utilized social media, nor have they taken much initiative to reach the community outside of traditional media releases and weekly commissioner meetings.

“I am grateful for the precision coverage of the News-Times and other local media. Without the contributions of local journalism, we might be suffering from less than adequate community engagement.  Now more than ever the community is pressed for time to engage with local government.  As a County Commissioner it will be my goal to meet the community with modern digital software platforms that provide text messaging, surveys and notifications that allow the community to provide more feedback to maximize their civic impact and responsibilities,” said Miller.

Casey Miller can be found online and on many social media platforms. He plans to do a series of virtual town hall meetings throughout his campaign and plans to make them a permanent feature of how he will engage the community as a newly elected County Commissioner.

Due to work hours Mr. Miller asks that he be reached before 8am, between 12 noon and 1pm, after 5pm, as well as on weekends.

Thank you for your time,

Casey Miller
541.961.1627
casey.mllr@gmail.com

 

County Commissioner Doug Hunt calls it quits…

Doug Hunt
Lincoln County Commissioner
Calling it quits in December…

Lincoln County Commissioner Doug Hunt announced that after decades of bank finance and public service as a county commissioner he’s hangin’ it up.  He’ll serve as a county commissioner until the last day of 2022.  After that he’ll be off to other new adventures, no doubt.

Commissioner Hunt was college educated, married his wife Patsy and had three children who are today grown ups with children of their own.   After Commissioner Hunt bids the two remaining commissioners good-bye, his seat will be filled by one of five local citizens who have indicated they want to take over  Commissioner Hunt’s chair – that election primary occurring May 17th.  The two surviving candidates will then battle it out in the November election.

Commissioner Kaety Jacobson thus far doesn’t appear to have a challenger for her commission seat.  Commissioner Claire Hall commended Commissioner Hunt for his hard work and contributions to the county.

 

Long time news reporter needs a place in Newport to share…

Wanted: Space to share in a Newport house (or large condo) to accommodate “back-to-hometown” news reporter

Since Newport is so filled up with visitors and renters I’m looking for a house, condo or apartment that has an empty room.  I always pay my rent on time and I’m also very helpful around the house.  I am a mature male that would like to help someone pay their rent or mortgage.  I have a clean record and more than half the town already knows my name.  I still have my Lincoln County internet  News Website – NewsLincolnCounty.com which I operate every day of the week which I enjoy.

If you’d like more information please call 541-351-1408.  I’d be more than happy to talk with you.

Call:  541-351-1408

Infectious disease specialist sees patients in Newport

Dr. Jill Provaznik, MD

Infectious disease specialist Jill Provaznik, MD, has joined Samaritan Health Services. She sees patients at Samaritan Medical Group Infectious Disease – Newport, as well as in Corvallis.

She earned a bachelor’s degree in biology and Spanish at University of Arkansas and a medical degree at University of Arkansas College of Medicine. She completed an internship and residency training at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center and a fellowship in infectious diseases at University of Utah School of Medicine.

Dr. Provaznik’s father was an internist and contributed to her interest in the medical field. She also became board certified in internal medicine.   “As I progressed through school, I figured out that I love science and biology, as well as learning about languages and different cultures,” she said. “But I also wanted to do something that would positively impact others.”

Specializing in infectious disease combines her professional interests with serving other people from a wide variety of backgrounds.  Dr. Provaznik was born in Portland and also lived in Oregon during her residency. She and her husband were introduced to fly fishing when they lived in Utah.  “We are excited to try our hand here in Oregon,” she said. Dr. Provaznik also enjoys hiking, biking, gardening and cooking.  She can be reached by calling Samaritan Infectious Disease – Corvallis at 541-768-5810.

Rep. David Gomberg reports….

David Gomberg

A Stark Reminder to Be Prepared

Dear Neighbors and Friends,

Just before six on Saturday morning, my phone lit up with texts and ringing voice messages. I was being called to a Lincoln County “coordinator” meeting to prepare for a distant tsunami projected to arrive on the Oregon coast two hours later.

On the call, we heard from county and city responders, the Coast Guard, State Parks, and local fire departments. The response was coordinated and well organized to move people off our beaches, get them out of our marinas, and to inform, but not unnecessarily frighten, the public.

The entire West Coast, including coastal Oregon, came under a tsunami advisory after an undersea volcano erupted in spectacular fashion near the Pacific nation of Tonga. Locally, people received text messages and automated phone calls (you can learn more about emergency alerts and sign up at https://oralert.gov/ ). Responders patrolled the beaches and our ports. Neighbors, family and friends reached out to each other in what should now be a well-practiced routine.

A second coordinator call at ten reviewed the situation and our performance.

Tsunami Alert Levels

e a Distant tsunamis generally have lesser affect and more warning time than near-shore events. The National Weather Service expected waves of 1 to 3 feet. As of early afternoon, the largest Oregon coast wave reported by the agency was a 1.5-foot swell observed at Port Orford.

By late afternoon, the warning was lifted. Awkwardly, more people may have actually come to the beach because there was a warning. Plenty of people, seeing the news, flocked to see the waves. But fortunately, there were no injuries and little damage.

I am grateful to the first responders and everyone who worked to alert residents and guests, and to keep them safe. In the coming weeks, I’ve asked the legislative committee charged with emergency response, to review how Oregon reacted and if the entire coast handled this situation as well as I believe Lincoln County did.

Saturday morning was a literal and figurative wake-up-call. It was a minor event. But it was a major reminder that natural disturbances are possible and that we need to be aware and prepared.

Oregon has experienced a recent cycle of emergencies and disasters, including floods, drought, wildfires, ice storms, excessive heat, and a pandemic. If the recent disasters that have impacted our state have taught us anything, it’s that being prepared can make a big difference. Each Oregon resident should proactively prepare to be self-sufficient for at least two weeks during a disaster.

If you see a big wall of water coming at you…

With tsunamis, the waves are tame one minute then a wall of fast moving water the next. That father and daughter were lucky they didn’t get run over and sucked out to sea.  Tsunami surges happen so fast – often ending with tragic outcomes.

The Second Surfrider 🏖❄Winter Beach Cleanup❄🏖 was a Huge Success! 🎉

The Second Surfrider 🏖❄Winter Beach Cleanup❄🏖 was a Huge Success! 🎉

Volunteers came out in droves and were greeted with sunny skies and beautiful weather to help clean our local beaches on Saturday, January 8. Over 100 volunteers dropped off about 1000 pounds of debris at local surf shops, ZuhG Life, Pura Vida, and South Beach Surf Shop.

Thanks to all the volunteers, our participating surf shops, and to North Lincoln Sanitary and Thompson’s Sanitary who donated their disposal services.

We will have another prize drawing for January participants, and everyone who has helped over the past two months will be entered in the grand prize drawing after the last cleanup in February for a chance to win a 7’6″ Lib Tech Pickup Stick Surfboard donated by 10 Barrel Brewing!

Large amounts of styrofoam from floating docks has been washed out to sea by the recent rains. This debris ends up on the beach. Surfrider encourages everyone to take a bag to the beach whenever they can and pick up trash.

The last cleanup in Surfrider’s Winter Series and last chance to enter the drawing will be on February 12.

Traffic Crash on Highway 20 at the west junction to Toledo

1:50pm  A two vehicle collision has occurred on Highway 20 at the west junction into Toledo.  Caution in the area.  No word yet on injuries.

1:56pm  One of the vehicles left the road and down in to a ditch.

1:58pm  Law Enforcement is calling for a Life Flight air ambulance.   A helicopter is on the ground in Newport.   Should be on scene in a matter of minutes if everybody’s listening to their medical emergency radios.

Wanted: Space to share in a Newport house (or large condo) to accommodate “back-to-hometown” news reporter

Since Newport is so filled up with visitors and renters I’m looking for a house, condo or apartment that has an empty room.  I always pay my rent on time and I’m also very helpful around the house.  I am a mature male that would like to help someone pay their rent or mortgage.  I have a clean record and more than half the town already knows my name.  I still have my Lincoln County internet  News Website – NewsLincolnCounty.com which I operate every day of the week which I enjoy.

If you’d like more information on me please call 541-351-1408.  I’d be more than happy to talk with you.

Call:  541-351-1408

Recreation hours are a’changin’

NEWPORT PARKS AND RECREATION AQUATIC CENTER HOURS OF OPERATION CHANGE

The Newport Parks and Recreation Department announces adjustments to the operational hours of the Newport Aquatic Center starting January 25, 2022. Hours are being adjusted due to staffing shortages that are being felt locally and nationally. The Newport Aquatic Center will return to normal operational hours as soon as staffing returns to an adequate level to provide a safe environment to our patrons.

Samaritan Pacific Hospital

Visit the https://newportoregon.gov/pool, contact the Recreation and Aquatic Center at (541) 265-7783, or see below for the temporary pool schedule changes.

For more information, please contact Mike Cavanaugh at 541-574-5453 or m.cavanaugh@newportoregon.gov.

Keeping our communities clean…

“Those who love the great outdoors are asking for our help to keep it that way…”

The Second Surfrider 🏖❄Winter Beach Cleanup❄🏖 was a Huge Success! 🎉

Volunteers came out in droves and were greeted with sunny skies and beautiful weather to help clean our local beaches on Saturday, January 8. Over 100 volunteers dropped off about 1000 pounds of debris at local surf shops, ZuhG Life, Pura Vida, and South Beach Surf Shop.

Thanks to all the volunteers, our participating surf shops, and to North Lincoln Sanitary and Thompson’s Sanitary who donated their disposal services.

We will have another prize drawing for January participants, and everyone who has helped over the past two months will be entered in the grand prize drawing after the last cleanup in February for a chance to win a 7’6″ Lib Tech Pickup Stick Surfboard donated by 10 Barrel Brewing!

Large amounts of styrofoam from floating docks has been washed out to sea by the recent rains. This debris ends up on the beach. Surfrider encourages everyone to take a bag to the beach whenever they can and pick up trash.

The last cleanup in Surfrider’s Winter Series and last chance to enter the drawing will be on February 12.

Things are looking a bit better but don’t tempt fate that fast-moving waves are done for the night

 
BEACH HAZARD STATEMENT
Issued:2:19 PM Fri, Jan 14, 2022
Expires:12:00 AM Sun, Jan 16, 2022
 
SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
Issued:5:02 AM Sat, Jan 15, 2022
Expires:10:45 PM Sat, Jan 15, 2022
 

BEACH HAZARD STATEMENT
Issue Date:2:19 PM Fri, Jan 14, 2022
Expiration:12:00 AM Sun, Jan 16, 2022

...BEACH HAZARDS STATEMENT REMAINS IN EFFECT UNTIL MIDNIGHT PST
TONIGHT...

* WHAT...Sneaker waves possible.

* WHERE...In Washington, South Washington Coast. In Oregon,
Central Oregon Coast and North Oregon Coast.

* WHEN...Through this evening.

* IMPACTS...Waves can run up significantly farther on a beach
than normal, including over rocks and jetties. Sneaker waves
can suddenly knock people off of their feet and quickly pull
them into the frigid ocean which may lead to serious injury or
drowning.

* ADDITIONAL DETAILS...The continuing sneaker wave threat is
resulting from ocean conditions not caused by the Tsunami. The
Tsunami threat has ended, but sneaker waves remain possible due
to long period swells.

Remain out of the water to avoid hazardous swimming conditions.

SPECIAL WEATHER STATEMENT
Issue Date:5:02 AM Sat, Jan 15, 2022
Expiration:10:45 PM Sat, Jan 15, 2022

...TSUNAMI ADVISORY HAS BEEN CANCELED...


...TSUNAMI ADVISORY HAS BEEN CANCELED...


* UPDATES... No further tsunami danger exists...however some areas
may continue to experience strong currents and small sea level
changes. Consult local authorities for information regarding any
beach restrictions.

* OBSERVED TSUNAMI WAVE HEIGHTS FROM EARLIER...
Port Orford, OR1.2 ft / 36 cm
La Push, WA1.1 ft / 34 cm
Charleston, OR0.8 ft / 24 cm
Newport, OR0.7 ft / 21 cm
Westport, WA0.5 ft / 15 cm
Astoria, OR0.2 ft / 6 cm

This will be the final statement issued for the local area for this
event.

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