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Oregon’s death toll for Covid-19 continues to rise…

Covid-19 is still keepin’ on keepin’ on. Those who aren’t getting vaccinated are a major part of the problem….

Cases and COVID-19 related deaths 

There are 21 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 3,682, the Oregon Health Authority reported. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 2,113 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 bringing the state total to 320,990. 

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (15), Benton (38), Clackamas (153), Clatsop (10), Columbia (32), Coos (48), Crook (38), Curry (2), Deschutes (162), Douglas (53), Grant (11), Harney (24), Hood River (6), Jackson (90), Jefferson (42), Josephine (22), Klamath (58), Lake (24), Lane (171), Lincoln (18), Linn (148), Malheur (28), Marion (193), Morrow (8), Multnomah (275), Polk (33), Tillamook (17), Umatilla (93), Union (32), Wallowa (8), Wasco (24), Washington (161) and Yamhill (76). 

For all the latest data on COVID-19 in Oregon, visit:  OHA’s data dashboards.

For more information, visit healthoregon.org/coronavirus.

Time again for Oregon’s Annual Great Oregon Shake-Out!

LINCOLN COUNTY COMMUNITIES AND INDIVIDUALS ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE IN ANNUAL GREAT OREGON SHAKEOUT

Lincoln County Emergency Management is encouraging community members, businesses, and community groups to participate in the 2021 Great Oregon ShakeOut. This event provides a chance for you to practice what you would do during an earthquake -wherever you may be at that time. While the official event takes place on Thursday, October 21 at 10:21 am, you can practice your drop, cover, and hold during the days leading up to or directly after the drill. The important part is to register if you want to participate.

By registering you will assist Lincoln County Public Safety agencies document the high level of preparedness in our community.  Participation in this event shows that we are working together to strengthen our community resiliency and emergency preparedness. This event is also provides a good reminder to update your emergency plans and supplies.

Oregon ShakeOut Statistics – www.shakeout.org/statistics/

Lincoln County residents live on the Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake Faultline. This means it is even more important for our communities to be informed and prepared. Keep an eye out for our new information and resource series, Cascadia: the Basics, coming this fall.

More information on earthquake and tsunami preparedness:

Great Oregon ShakeOut:

  • Registration & General Information: www.shakeout.org/oregon/
  • Recommended Earthquake Safety Actions:www.earthquakecountry.org/library/ShakeOut_Recommended_Earthquake_Safety_Actions.pdf
  • Earthquake Guide for People with Disabilities: www.earthquakecountry.org/library/ShakeOut_Earthquake_Guide_Disabilities_AF N.pdf
  • Media – PSA Resources: www.shakeout.org/oregon/resources/index.html#multimediaLincoln County Emergency Management
  • Hazards: Earthquakes: www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement/page/hazards- earthquake
  • Hazards: Tsunamis: www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement/page/hazards- tsunamis
  • Main page: www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement

         CDC

  • Preparing for an earthquake: www.cdc.gov/disasters/earthquakes/prepared.html
  • Tsunamis: www.cdc.gov/disasters/tsunamis/Ready.gov
  • Earthquakes: www.ready.gov/earthquakes
  • Tsunamis: www.ready.gov/tsunamisRed Cross

• Earthquake Safety: www.redcross.org/get-help/how-to-prepare-for-emergencies/types- of-emergencies/earthquake.html

ODOT issued warning starting Monday evening, September 27th

ODOT has advised that there will be night-time single lane closures on the Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, starting Monday evening, September 27th and finishing the morning of Saturday, October 3rd. Closures are anticipated to be from 7 PM until 6 AM. There will be message signs warning of construction north and south of the bridge.

Thank you for your patience and cooperation.

Childcare Startup Workshop beginning October 19

Spaces still available in childcare startup workshop beginning Oct. 19, 4-7 p.m. Tuesdays, Oct. 19-Nov. 2

Room 140 | OCCC Newport Campus  |  400 SE College Way
Register:
oregoncoast.edu/childcare-startups – 

Registrations have been coming in at a good pace, but there is still room for additional participants in a workshop coming in October, created to help Lincoln County residents learn more about how to launch a childcare business here on the coast. 

The OCCC Small Business Development Center, with support from Northwest Oregon Works, is pleased to present this four-part workshop designed to help launch new childcare businesses here in Lincoln County,  and to help ensure their long-term success. 

“The tight labor market we’ve seen in recent months is unprecedented,” said Misty Lambrecht, OCCC’s Small Business Management Coordinator and the creator of the childcare series. “There are myriad reasons for the difficulties local employers have had in finding and keeping good employees. One of these reasons, though, is a paucity of quality childcare – a shortage exacerbated by the pandemic. If this workshop can help launch even one home-based childcare business, that could mean as many as 10 workers could return to their jobs, secure in the knowledge that their children are safe and secure.”

The series will run four consecutive Tuesdays, Oct. 19 to Nov. 2, from 4 p.m. to 7 p.m., at the OCCC Central County Campus in Newport. The program features an in-depth session on regulations, finance, and licensure, led by guest presenters from Linn-Benton Community College. Another will feature general information about business formation, operation, and bookkeeping, led by Lambrecht. A third workshop focuses on insurance and legal considerations. Participants will also register for an LBCC-hosted infant and child CPR/First Aid session, via independent study.

Thanks to support from Northwest Oregon Works, there is no cost to attend the workshops (excluding a $55 fee for the First Aid independent study requirement).  OCCC thanks Jose Hernandez, of LBCC, for his assistance.

To register, visit oregoncoast.edu/childcare-startups, or call 541-994-4166. 

Car crash on E. Devils Lake Road

5:49pm  Single vehicle crash on East Devils Lake Road in Lincoln City.  Driver uninjured.  Tow truck is enroute to the scene.  Vehicle is off the road,

Newport Visual Arts Center – Definitely “Where it’s at!” October 2, Noon to 4pm

“Reserve Inspiration” Exhibition Travels to Newport Visual Arts Center

Public opening scheduled for October 2, noon to 4pm, with artists speaking at 2pm

The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts presents the exhibition, “Reserve Inspiration,” from October 2 to 30 in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center (777 NW Beach Dr.). The group exhibit will feature nine regional artists reflecting on the importance of the marine reserves located along the Oregon coastline. Artistic mediums will include painting, ceramics, photography, science illustration and mixed-media. A public opening will be held on Saturday, October 2, noon to 4pm, with available artists speaking at 2pm.

The Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife manages five marine reserves totally over 75 square miles, with each reserve also enjoying an adjacent marine protected area. The reserves are located at Cape Falcon, Cascade Head, Otter Rock Cape Perpetua and Redfish Rocks.

According to ODFW, marine reserves are areas in coastal waters dedicated to conservation and scientific research. All removal of marine life is prohibited, as is ocean development. Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) are adjacent to the reserves. Ocean development is still prohibited, but some fishing activities are allowed.

The nine artists participating in the “Reserve Inspiration” exhibit are Julie Fiedler, Scott Groth, Cynthia Longhat-Adams, Helen Kropp, Victoria McOmie, Ernie Rose, Nora Sherwood, Jill Perry Townsend and Dennis White.

South Beach is starting to come into its own…

THE CITY OF NEWPORT SEEKS INPUT ON SOUTH BEACH PROJECTS

During the summer, the City of Newport asked for feedback on the types of investments the Newport Urban Renewal Agency should make, in and around South Beach over the next four to five years. More than 300 people responded with a host of feedback and ideas for projects to enhance the tax base, promote livability, and improve experiences for area residents, visitors, and employees. The city appreciates your valuable input!

Your thoughts and ideas helped the Urban Renewal Agency and its consultants prepare a preliminary set of projects for the Agency’s final round of South Beach investments. With this survey, we want to hear how those projects should be prioritized. The city will use that information to prepare a final, prioritized set of projectrecommendations for the Agency’s consideration.

The survey is on the Virtual Open House website. Learn more about the project and take the survey at: https://NewportOregon.gov/SBOpenHouse. The survey will be open until October 15.

Questions should be directed to Derrick Tokos, Community Development Director, atd.tokos@newportoregon.gov.

Gribler Loving Trust Scholarships awarded to nursing students

Four Lincoln County nursing students are this year’s recipients of the Gribler Loving Trust Nursing Scholarship from the Pacific Communities Health District Foundation.

McKenzie Thomas was awarded $3,000 toward her education, while Ann Martin, Alair Sjostrom and Gabrielle Zimmerman each received $2,000.

As part of the application process, each student submitted short autobiographies addressing their commitment, background, work ethic and desire to become a nurse.

“After reading their heartfelt words, I have no doubt that they will make good use of the scholarship support and go on to be assets to the nursing profession and to our community,” said Ursula Marinelli, PCHD Foundation executive director, who announced the scholarship recipients.

Expressing an interest in science, appreciation for the sense of community in Lincoln County, and a desire to help locals be safer are among the things that prompted McKenzie Thomas to pursue a nursing degree. She wrote in her essay: “I know that my nursing journey  will not always be easy, but I feel that the reward of seeing the impact I make in my community will make all the work worth it.”

Since the age of 12, Ann Martin knew she wanted to help others in need. While raising her family, she worked as a unit secretary in a large teaching hospital and later earned a bachelor’s degree in rehabilitation. It wasn’t until she moved to her “forever home” of Newport that she discovered her desire to become a registered nurse. When COVID-19 hit, she became a certified nursing assistant and worked on the COVID hall at a nursing facility. “Throughout my life, my commitment to bettering the lives of others has come to fruition in many ways. I will devote my life’s work to caring for others to the very best of my ability,” Martin wrote.

Alair Sjostrom, who has worked as a certified nursing assistant at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital for the past five years, wrote about her desire to help others since she was a young girl, and how she overcame failures and obstacles, including a traumatic car crash. “I never gave up no matter how many times I wanted to quit. … [I had to] work twice as hard mentally and physically to prove myself right. Now I’m proud to say I’m a second-year nursing student.”

Second-year nursing student Gabrielle Zimmerman wrote that the challenges of this past year have only deepened her admiration for her chosen career path. “As I continue to further my knowledge of the medical field, my interest in it only grows stronger and I truly feel honored to be a nursing student. Every challenge has led me to work harder and continue to push forward. When COVID is over, I will be able to look back and say ‘I made it through, in the middle of a pandemic. Anything is possible!’ ”

The scholarship is named for Olga and Bill Gribler, who were active in the Newport community beginning in 1947. Olga worked for the telephone company and later at the Bank of Newport. Bill taught music and entertained throughout the community. The Griblers established a generous scholarship with the PCHD Foundation to address the ongoing need for quality nurses in this rural area. To date, the PCHD Foundation has awarded more than $71,000 in Gribler scholarships to 24 students, including this year’s recipients.

For more information about the PCHD Foundation, visit samhealth.org/PCHDF or call 541-574-4745.

Water’s getting low. Don’t waste what’s left!!

CITY OF NEWPORT
STAGE TWO WATER CURTAILMENT TERMINATED STAGE ONE WATER CURTAILMENT CONTINUES

The Newport City Council, at its meeting of September 20, terminated the Alert Stage 2 Water Curtailment restrictions that were enacted on August 4, 2021. An Alert Stage 1 Water Curtailment is still in effect until further notice, and residents and visitors are urged to conserve water.

Water conservation measures include:

●  Be mindful of running water.

●  Repair leaks as soon as possible.

●  Avoid letting the toilet run.

●  Wash (dishes and clothes) full loads only.

●  Use a compost bin.

There are many other water conservation measures that can be utilized.

On June 28, 2021, the city issued notice of an Alert Stage 1 Water Curtailment. This was done in conjunction with the Lincoln County Commissioner’s declaration of a countywide drought. This was a water system advisory which informed the community of the situation and recommended voluntary water conservation.

The City of Newport thanks its residents and businesses for their cooperation.

Familiar faces with familiar instruments. Come partake of the music…

Drum Circle Performance Series Finale is Saturday

Outside Newport Public Library

The Newport/Oregon Coast Community Drum Circle will present the final monthly concert in its 11th Annual Summer Celebration Performance Series of free live-in-person outdoor stage shows this Saturday [September 25] from Noon to 3:00 p.m. at the Literacy Park Amphitheater at 370 W. Olive St. behind the Newport Public Library.

The Season Finale will feature three hours of multicultural traditional and indigenous World Beat rhythm and song by the Thunder & Lightness Trio with Mary-Beth Nickel on the Native American flutes, percussionists Chandler Davis and Sandra Surber, and Special Musical Guests. The show will also incorporate the audience with a supervised and facilitated open drum circle segment. Due to COVID concerns loaner drums will not be available, but participants are encouraged to bring their own drums or light percussion instruments.

All ages and skill levels are invited to enjoy and participate in the family friendly and pet friendly (on a leash) gathering. There is plenty of bleacher style seating in the amphitheater and the grassy areas in the park are perfect for laying down a picnic lunch.

Contact Davis at chandler@chandlerdavis.com or via Facebook Messenger for more information.

 

Spotlight on the Teachers!

Rita Warton – Left
Donna Olson – Middle
Cathy Predmore – Right

Spotlight on the Teachers Concert: A Piano Extravaganza 

Contact:  Jessica Treon 541-563-4183

A Piano Extravaganza will be presented this Sunday, September 26 at 2 p.m. at the Newport Performing Arts Center. The concert will also be livestreamed on YouTube by students of the Video Class at Waldport High School. Two students with their teacher, Philip Reed will be on site to do the recording.  All those attending the concert must wear masks and bring either a COVID vaccination record or proof of negative COVID test taken within 72 hours of the performance. People who would like to livestream the concert can get the link by calling or texting 541-961-0959. Donations can also be mailed to Lincoln County OMTA at P.O. Box 2253, Newport, OR 97365. This concert is one of the biannual benefits presented by the Lincoln County Oregon Music Teachers Association.  Admission is by donation to the Suzanne Brown Student Aid Fund. The concert proceeds sustain the Suzanne Brown Scholarship fund. The fund is designed to keep students in lessons who cannot afford the full costs of music education. The fund can be used to pay tuition, buy books, pay for festival fees or any other music related expense. The family contributes what they can, teachers discount their fees, and the fund makes up the difference. 

 “We have seven talented pianists and two guest instrumentalists performing on Sunday,” says Rita Warton, Co-President of the local OMTA group. “Each pianist chooses their own solo, duet, or two-piano number, and it has resulted in a wonderful mix on this program. There will be solos composed by Johannes Brahms, Frederic Chopin, Felix Mendelssohn, Edvard Grieg, Claude Debussy, and Maurice Ravel. The first movement of the Sonata in D for Two Pianos by W.A. Mozart and Sergie Rachmaninoff’s Vocalise written for viola and piano round out the list of the most famous composers on the program. There will also be works by lessor known composers and a piece written for bassoon and piano,” says Warton. “It’s a first for us to have a bassoon on the program!”                                                     

Guest performer, Evelyn Archer is new to the Spotlight Concerts which have been going on for over twenty years. Archer is recently moved to the coast from St. Louis, Missouri. She is a retired elementary music teacher and holds a Bachelor of Music Education as well as a Master of Music in Performance on bassoon. She has performed in many orchestras including the University City Orchestra in St. Louis, the St. Louis Wind Symphony Orchestra, and the Kirkwood Symphony Orchestra. 

Violist Mindy Simon is a local string musician who studied at North Arizona University. She performed with the Flagstaff Symphony Orchestra and the Boulder Philharmonic. Simon has performed in pit orchestras locally with Coastal Arts Production, Red Octopus and Porthole Players.  She is currently teaching through the Newport Symphony Orchestra’s Family Strings Program.

There will be seven local teachers performing in the concert, Ramona Goddard, Mary Morganti, Donna Olson, Andrea Roesel, Mary Lee Scoville, Jessica Treon, and Rita Warton. 

“The concert will last about an hour with no breaks to keep exposure to Covid at a minimum.  We will come out after our performance as we always do, but again to keep low exposure, there will be no refreshments,” says Jessica Treon. 

For more information about the concert or the scholarship fund call Jessica Treon 541-563-4183 or visit our website omta-lincolncounty.org or Lincoln County Oregon Music Teachers Association on Facebook.  

Things are really movin’ along in Depoe Bay

Depoe Bay –
Cecille Kennedy

Depoe Bay City Council this week got quite a progress report on the amount of growth in housing, streets and utilities.  The bay itself will soon be dredged to allow water craft to come and go and not worry about scraping the bottom of the bay – the funds coming from the federal government.  Dredging is scheduled to start September 27th and take about a week to 10 days to get’er done.

Depoe Bay’s Memorial Wall will likely wind up doubling the number of notable citizens who have served the city.  There’s already one wall full of such photos and it will be very interesting to discover what other Depoe Bay “notables'” will have their photographed faces placed on an additional wall.  There’s talk that the second wall might be finished by the end of October.

And the city council gave a favorable nod on an Urban Renewal Project – refurbishing the parking lot on Bay Street complete with a seal coat and striping.

The city council agreed to join-in what is called the Great Oregon Shake Out…aka Cascadia Rising.  Geologists say the Cascadia Subduction Earthquake Zone just off the Oregon Coast hasn’t shaken things up for over 300 years and geologists say it’s long overdue.

And finally, Depoe Bay has decided to raise tourism room taxes as has already been done elsewhere in the county.  Depoe Bay’s new lodging tax will rise to 12%.

 

Looks like Summer isn’t quite over….

When mom rings the bell she starts “Feedin’ the Troops”

Feeding rescue animals (alpacas) alfalfa sprouts. They seem to be picky – they are herbivores/vegetarians. They were not at all interested in Ritz crackers. The other rescue animals-goats, chickens, turkeys, pigs inhaled them.

Cecille Kennedy photo

Practice makes perfect – especially when facing substantial ground movement…

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OFFICE OF THE SHERIFF

Sheriff Curtis L. Landers

(541) 265-4277 Fax (541) 265-4926

Virginia “Jenny” Demaris, Emergency Manager (541) 265-4199
vdemaris@co.lincoln.or.us

LINCOLN COUNTY COMMUNITIES AND INDIVIDUALS ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE IN ANNUAL GREAT OREGON SHAKEOUT

Lincoln County Emergency Management is encouraging community members, businesses, and community groups to participate in the 2021 Great Oregon ShakeOut. This event provides a chance for you to practice what you would do during an earthquake -wherever you may be at that time. While the official event takes place on Thursday, October 21 at 10:21 am, you can practice your drop, cover, and hold during the days leading up to or directly after the drill. The important part is to register if you participate.

By registering you will assist Lincoln County Public Safety agencies in documenting the high level of preparedness in our community. Participation in this event shows that we are working together to strengthen our community resiliency and emergency preparedness. This event also provides an important reminder to update your emergency plans and supplies.

Below is a graphic on the annual summary of participants here in Lincoln County along with the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office

page1image23587184

Lincoln County residents live on the Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake Faultline. This means it is even more important for our communities to be informed and prepared. Keep an eye out for our new information and resource series, Cascadia: the Basics, coming this fall.

More information on earthquake and tsunami preparedness:

Great Oregon ShakeOut:

  • Registration & General Information: www.shakeout.org/oregon/
  • Recommended Earthquake Safety Actions:  www.earthquakecountry.org/library/ShakeOut_Recommended_Earthquake_Safety_Actions.pdf
  • Earthquake Guide for People with Disabilities:www.earthquakecountry.org/library/ShakeOut_Earthquake_Guide_Disabilities_AF N.pdf
  • Media – PSA Resources: www.shakeout.org/oregon/resources/index.html#multimediaLincoln County Emergency Management
  • Hazards: Earthquakes: www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement/page/hazards- earthquake
  • Hazards: Tsunamis: www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement/page/hazards- tsunamis
  • Main page: www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagementLincoln County Sheriff’s Office

Quality Stroke Care – It’s at Samaritan Hospitals

Samaritan hospitals honored for quality stroke care

Corvallis– Samaritan hospitals in Benton, Lincoln and Linn counties have earned Get With The Guidelines®-Stroke awards by the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association. The awards recognize commitment to providing the most appropriate stroke treatment according to nationally recognized guidelines based on the latest scientific evidence. The awards are:

Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.

Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in Newport – Stroke Gold Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.

Samaritan Albany General Hospital – Stroke Silver Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.

Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center in Corvallis – Stroke Silver Plus Quality Achievement Award with Target: Type 2 Diabetes Honor Roll.

To qualify for the awards, hospitals must meet specific goals in comprehensive stroke care and meet quality measures developed to minimize the time between the patient’s arrival at the hospital and treatment with the clot-buster tissue plasminogen activator, or alteplase, known as tPA. This is the only drug approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat ischemic stroke. If given in the first three hours after the start of stroke symptoms, tPA has been shown to significantly reduce the effects of stroke and lessen the chance of permanent disability.  

“These awards represent a tremendous amount of teamwork, not just among our staff but with local EMS as well to provide coordinated stroke care to save brain tissue,” said Dan Sherman, RN, coordinator with the Samaritan Stroke Program. “Stroke care is very time-sensitive, and the fact that we have been recognized for so many years should be a source of pride for everyone who is involved in stroke care.”

Samaritan Albany General Hospital was also named a Primary Stroke Center by the accrediting agency DNV in 2019, and Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center has been a Primary Stroke Center since 2012. 

The Samaritan Stroke Services team of specialists work together from the beginning of a patient’s visit and follow their care throughout the patient’s time in the hospital. The team helps stop the stroke, to reduce the patient’s disabilities from the stroke. For more information, call 541-768-6737, email SHSstrokeservices@samhealth.org or visit samhealth.org/Stroke.

Covid-19 Update

Taking extra precautions while dating during COVID-19

Across Oregon, college students are returning to campuses and finding that dating and relationships are different than before the COVID-19 pandemic. Taking precautions to protect oneself and others from acquiring or spreading COVID-19 continues to be an important part of our everyday lives.   

But, with the availability of vaccines and testing there is a natural desire to want to return to “normal,” to do the everyday activities we enjoy and probably took for granted before March 2020. For young adults, dating and intimacy can be particularly challenging with COVID-19 still being a risk factor.   

Here are some tips for staying safe while dating:  

  • Get vaccinated.  
  • Communicate your level ofcomfort and expectations.   
  • If it’s important to you, ask your date if they are vaccinated.  
  • If it feels safer, stick with virtual dating.  
  • If Zoom dates aren’t cutting it, consider outdoor activities like a picnic, hike or patio dining.  
  • Before meeting in person, ask your date how they have been feeling and if they have potential COVID-19 symptoms, postpone for 10 days.    
  • If you are in a crowd outdoors or are inside a public space, please wear a mask and physically distance.  

Sometimes navigating the world of dating, relationships and sex can be confusing and awkward, but with COVID-19 there are additional concerns and health risks.  

If you plan to be intimate, consider:   

  • COVID-19 can be spread by close, physical contact including kissing, sex and other acts that will likely exchange bodily fluids.  
  • If you or your date/partner think you may have been exposed to COVID-19, put a hold on sexual activities and discuss how you can practice safer sex moving forward.  
  • Having one sexual partner who has limited exposure to others in their daily interactions.  
  • Using condoms, internal condoms, or dental dams. 
  • If both of you are vaccinated, feeling well and are taking precautions to avoid COVID-19 exposure, intimacy is likely to be safe.  
  • You are your safest sexual partner!  

Sex can and should be fun, healthy and loving. But please remember that the best intimate interactions also mean:  

  • Choosing not to have sex for any reason — if you don’t give yourconsentto continue — must always be respected.  

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