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World Beat rhythm returns to Newport’s Nye Beach

    World Beat rhythm returns to Newport’s Nye Beach 

The Newport/Oregon Coast Community Drum Circle will be returning to Newport’s Coast Park in the historic Nye Beach District this Saturday [August 20] from Noon to 3:00 pm for an all-new August edition of its 12th Annual Summer Celebration Outdoor Concert Series — and to attempt to preserve a Newport and Nye Beach tradition. 

The summer-long, monthly free performances, featuring the not-for-profit drum circle’s Thunder & Lightness World Beat Ensemble, became a Nye Beach institution after it began as a free street performance sponsored by the Nye Beach Merchants Association in 2009 and evolved over the next decade into a full-fledged monthly summer variety show on the large outdoor theater stage in the Courtyard at the old Café Mundo. 

Since the closing of Café Mundo, the event has continued in a variety of locations, including online for a year as it dodged the initial COVID outbreak. Last month the event moved from the Literacy Park Amphitheater behind the Newport Public Library to Newport’s newest park, nicknamed “Pirate Park” for its pirate ship playground feature. 

Due to COVID the summer concerts are also incorporating the formerly separate monthly open drum circles this year. The group celebrates its 15th Anniversary, this month, of providing free and family friendly year-round participatory and performance events on the Central Oregon Coast. 

The new park is at 100 SW Coast Street, just east of the Newport Performing Arts Center. Drum Circle Coordinator Chander Davis said the park worked well for last month’s show and drew a good crowd, “It’s fully wheelchair accessible and very family-oriented with a small performance area and amphitheater type seating. Audience members can bring lawn chairs or blankets to spread out on the grassy areas and it has picnic tables, a state-of-the art playground, lots of parking, and easy access to a modern flush bathroom.” 

Saturday’s performance will feature an eclectic blend of high-energy multicultural traditional and indigenous rhythm and song with Davis leading on percussion, Mary-Beth Nickel on the Native American flutes, and surprise musical guests. Audience members are invited to bring their own acoustic hand drums and light percussion instruments to jam along with the performers.  

Contact Davis directly for more information at chandler@chandlerdavis.com or 541-351-5757. 

Don’t let your faucets run your lives….

Mid-Coast Communities Encourage Water Conservation to Protect Against Effects of Drought and Climate Change

Mid-Coast water providers are asking residents to develop and expand water conservation habits now to strengthen our communities’ resiliency in lower rainfall and drought years, which are expected to increase in frequency and severity with climate change. Water conservation also reduces the likelihood of restrictive water curtailment actions related to hot and dry weather conditions.

When we collectively conserve water, we reduce demand for water, increasing the reliability of our precious water sources and helping us stretch our currently available water supplies further. For these reasons, the Mid-Coast Water Conservation Consortium (MCWCC), a collaborative group of local water providers, is advising water users to take urgent action to conserve water—and to make these water- saving efforts a habit.

Recommended outdoor and indoor water conservation actions include:

  • Irrigate first thing in the morning or at the end of the day to reduce water lost to evaporation.
  • Use a broom instead of a hose to clean your outdoor spaces.
  • Replace hose washers at leaky hose connections—an inexpensive, simple fix.
  • Use a multi-spray hose nozzle or watering can when watering by hand.
  • Check for leaks in your irrigation system and repair any you find.
  • Position your sprinklers so that they water your lawn, not the pavement.
  • Set mower blades higher. Longer grass has deeper, stronger roots that retain soil moisture longer,reducing the amount of water needed.
  • Go to commercial car washes that recycle or reuse water instead of washing your car at home.
  • Run the dishwasher and washing machine with full loads only.
  • Minimize your shower time and install a water-efficient showerhead.
  • Turn off the faucet when you’re not actively using the water—such as brushing your teeth,scrubbing your dishes, etc.
  • Add water-efficient faucet aerators to the faucets in your home.
  • Scrape food off of plates instead of rinsing them.
  • If you have an old toilet that uses more than 1.6 gallons per flush, add a toilet tank waterdisplacement bag to the tank to reduce water use per flush or upgrade to a water-efficient toilet.
  • Check with your water provider about the availability of free water conservation items.A reliable water supply is vital for the community, economy, and environment. Together, our water conservation habits will help improve the reliability of our water supply. If you have any questions, contact your local water provider. Contact information can be found on your water bill.The MCWCC is a group of water providers on the Mid-Coast working together to promote water conservation to improve resiliency to droughts and water supply emergencies and to increase coordination among water providers on the Mid-Coast. For more information about the MCWCC, contact Suzanne de Szoeke at 541-257-9006 or sdeszoeke@gsiws.com.

Time to acknowledge that water we drink flows into the sea…not the other way around….

Mid-Coast Communities Encourage Water Conservation to Protect Against Effects of Drought and Climate Change

Mid-Coast water providers are asking residents to develop and expand water conservation habits now to strengthen our communities’ resiliency in lower rainfall and drought years, which are expected to increase in frequency and severity with climate change. Water conservation also reduces the likelihood of restrictive water curtailment actions related to hot and dry weather conditions.

When we collectively conserve water, we reduce demand for water, increasing the reliability of our precious water sources and helping us stretch our currently available water supplies further. For these reasons, the Mid-Coast Water Conservation Consortium (MCWCC), a collaborative group of local water providers, is advising water users to take urgent action to conserve water—and to make these water- saving efforts a habit.

Recommended outdoor and indoor water conservation actions include:

  • Irrigate first thing in the morning or at the end of the day to reduce water lost to evaporation.
  • Use a broom instead of a hose to clean your outdoor spaces.
  • Replace hose washers at leaky hose connections—an inexpensive, simple fix.
  • Use a multi-spray hose nozzle or watering can when watering by hand.
  • Check for leaks in your irrigation system and repair any you find.
  • Position your sprinklers so that they water your lawn, not the pavement.
  • Set mower blades higher. Longer grass has deeper, stronger roots that retain soil moisture longer, reducing the amount of water needed.
  • Go to commercial car washes that recycle or reuse water instead of washing your car at home.
  • Run the dishwasher and washing machine with full loads only.
  • Minimize your shower time and install a water-efficient showerhead.
  • Turn off the faucet when you’re not actively using the water—such as brushing your teeth, scrubbing your dishes, etc.
  • Add water-efficient faucet aerators to the faucets in your home.
  • Scrape food off of plates instead of rinsing them.
  • If you have an old toilet that uses more than 1.6 gallons per flush, add a toilet tank water displacement bag to the tank to reduce water use per flush or upgrade to a water-efficient toilet.
  • Check with your water provider about the availability of free water conservation items.A reliable water supply is vital for the community, economy, and environment. Together, our water conservation habits will help improve the reliability of our water supply. If you have any questions, contact your local water provider. Contact information can be found on your water bill.The MCWCC is a group of water providers on the Mid-Coast working together to promote water conservation to improve resiliency to droughts and water supply emergencies and to increase coordination among water providers on the Mid-Coast. For more information about the MCWCC, contact Suzanne de Szoeke at 541-257-9006 or sdeszoeke@gsiws.com.

Coast Busters Return for Second Annual Breast Cancer Walk

Coast Busters Returns for Second Annual Breast Cancer Walk

Newport, OR – The Coast Busters Walk for Breast Cancer, presented by Next Home Picket Fence Realty, returns for the second year on Saturday, October 1 in Newport.  Kicking off Breast Cancer Awareness Month, this walk is the outcome of two local ladies’ desire to inspire hope for other women and their families struggling with breast cancer.

Recent breast cancer survivors themselves, Sonia Graham and Jeanette Campagna decided to make a difference in the lives of women and others in their own community battling breast cancer and to give back to the community and medical teams that supported them. They adopted the motto that something good can certainly come from something bad – and started the first annual walk last year.

Last year’s walk attracted over 100 participants and proceeds of more than $14,000 for local women battling cancer.  The three-mile walk will again be held on the track at Newport High School. Proceeds raised from the event will stay local and benefit Pacific Communities Health District Foundation Women’s Cancer Fund and Willamette Valley Cancer Foundation. These organizations provide a wide array of support that aids breast cancer patients with many facets of their cancer treatment. It’s an opportunity to proudly raise awareness in the community and provide faith, courage, confidence, and hope for all women who have been affected by breast cancer.

Registration fees include a Coast Busters Walk t-shirt, pink ribbon pin, event festivities, and the power in knowing that women and their families fighting breast cancer will benefit significantly.  Early bird registration is $25 until August 31 and guarantees an official event t-shirt. General registration is $35 from September 1-30. Registration on the day of the event is $45. Those who raise $150 or more will have their name publicly placed on the Coast Busters Honor Roll. People are encouraged to create a team and dress up in their favorite pink attire on Walk Day. Prizes will be awarded to the top three individual fundraisers and the those with the best themed attire.

To register or donate, visit www.CoastBustersWalk.com. Sponsorships are also available with marketing benefits on official event flyers, t-shirts, social media, and more.

Thanks to the generous event sponsors:

Presenting Tatas Sponsor – Next Home Picket Fence Realty, Knockers Sponsors – 100.7 The Otter, Advantage Real Estate, Borrow Smart Mortgage, eXp Realty, Farmers Insurance/Olson Insurance Agency, Martek Real Estate, NW Natural, Oceanview Senior Living, Oregon Coast Bank, Oregon Coast Breaking News, Rotary of Newport, SJ Custom Jewelers, The Killers Pest Control, Thompson’s Sanitary Service, TLC, A Division of Fibre Federal Credit Union, and Windermere West Coast Properties, Bosoms Sponsors – Back Bay Marine, BBSI, Elk City Coffee, and Julia Ryan Marketing

For more information, contact Jeanette Campagna at jeanette@CoastBustersWalk.com or 970-485-9696, or Sonia Graham at sonia@CoastBustersWalk.com or 541-224-1985.

 

CORVALLIS, Ore. – U.S. Department of  Energy Secretary Jennifer Granholm, Oregon U.S. Sens. Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley and Oregon Gov. Kate Brown visited the Hinsdale Wave Research Laboratory at Oregon State University on Tuesday afternoon, with Granholm touting wave energy as “the elixir that we need” to address climate change by ending the nation’s reliance on fossil fuels. 


The visit was organized by OSU and the Pacific Marine Energy Center, a consortium of universities including Oregon State that is focused on advancing marine renewable energy.

“We’ve all been in the ocean,” Granholm told a group of OSU researchers and students after touring the lab’s wave basin and flume. “We’ve all felt the energy it has. That energy can be used to turn on the lights in our homes. Those waves never stop moving.”  During the 80-minute visit to the wave lab, the secretary, senators and governor mingled with graduate students who provided presentations on their research. The leaders also discussed the future of green energy with OSU faculty from the colleges of Engineering and Earth, Ocean, and Atmospheric Sciences.

The state and federal leaders heard presentations on the use of autonomous underwater robots, which are seen as the key to safely inspecting and maintaining undersea generation equipment.  The leaders also heard updates on PacWave, Oregon State’s open-ocean wave energy test facility to be constructed 7 miles off the Oregon Coast south of Newport, and C-Power, an Oregon company that makes marine energy power generation devices.

“As a land grant institution, Oregon State University takes on society’s most pressing issues, like climate change by coming up with clean energy solutions,” OSU Interim President Becky Johnson told the state and federal leaders. “I’m proud of our marine energy research and development initiatives, which are only possible because of the support we receive at the federal and state levels.”

Wyden pledged to make collaboration, research and federal investments priorities in advancing wave energy development.  “Every step of the way we’ll bring people together, fishing families and the Tribes,” added Wyden. “We need both funding for the research and for economic activity in the private sector. Sen. Merkley and I are in a position to make sure marine energy gets done right.”

Wind, solar and wave energy show “enormous potential,” said Merkley. “We have some of the best locations for wave power, and we need facilities like this lab and PacWave to develop the technologies for harvesting it,” he said. “My hope is that 10 years from now wave energy is a real thing.”

Brown described Granholm as a “phenomenal leader working to decarbonize the energy grid.  “She shares our values, and the No. 1 value is collaboration,” Brown said. “We need everyone, including the federal government and the private sector, to make green energy work. Equity needs to be at the forefront as we work toward a fossil-free energy future because we know that people of color and Indigenous people have been disproportionately impacted by climate change.”

Lincoln City City Council take big steps to provide affordable housing for lower income famililes

The Lincoln City City Council gave the green light this week to a non-profit development company to build 107 apartment units on NE 25th street.  And because they’re building them by a company that doesn’t run the price up through the clouds, eligible families will be moving in rather soon.

Innovative Housing Incorporated (IHI) is a non-profit affordable housing company for those who just don’t have hundreds of thousands of dollars for decent housing.  City officials say low income families will be able to move in based on income.  No millionaires allowed.  Word has it that the apartment complex will be built and filled up in a year to 18 months.  Hopefully other cities and communities in the area will follow in their foot-steps.

How much is too much?

An effort to slow down the number of vacation rentals in the unincorporated areas of Lincoln County, the state Land Use Board Appeals (LUBA) reacted by pulling the rug out from under those permanent residents who have been trying to slow down the emergence of vacation rentals outside city limits.  State LUBA stepped in and invalidated the measure saying it’s is in violation of state law that governs counties.  The group, 15 Neighborhoods, is trying to slow down things down.  15 Neighborhood’s Monica Kirk and Michelle Riley have 21 days to appeal LUBA’s ruling.

In the meantime control over vacation rentals outside of city limits rests with Lincoln County officials who are still wrestling with Ordinance 523 which is still being argued in county circuit court.  County officials are evaluating existing vacation rentals to determine which areas of the county can meet the needs of out of town visitors.  And of course, the more visitors means more revenue for Lincoln County. which results in a considerable amount of tourist-related money that winds up in county’s coffers.

We’ll see how things turn out.

 

“Today was a big day for America”…Sen. Jeff Merkley

Sen. Jeff Merkley
D-Oregon

Merkley Applauds Passage of Inflation Reduction Act: “Today is a big day for America”

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon’s U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley released the following statement after the U.S. Senate passed the Inflation Reduction Act, historic legislation that will tackle the climate crisis, lower health care costs, and increase tax fairness, all while creating good-paying American jobs. For years, Merkley has been one of the Senate’s foremost advocates for bold climate action.

“Today is a big day for America. For the first time, the U.S. Senate has passed major legislation to remake our energy system—and to do so while also lowering health care costs and creating good-paying, family wage jobs, all paid for by ensuring billionaires and big corporations pay their fair share in taxes.

“We’re taking on Big Pharma to lower drug prices. This bill starts the process of negotiating prescription drug prices and caps out-of-pocket costs for prescriptions at $2,000 a year for seniors on Medicare. Additionally, it helps middle class families get affordable insurance coverage by extending key tax credits and preventing big cost increases that would have hit families this fall. This bill is a big win for affordable health care, and we need to keep building on it. American taxpayers contribute more than the citizens of any other nation in the world to research and development of drugs. They deserve the best prices in the world, not the worst.

“We’re going to transition to clean energy and create high-quality union jobs while we do it. Year after year, I’ve seen my home state of Oregon and other states across the West decimated by mega wildfires and record droughts. In other parts of the country, we’ve seen superstorms, sea rise, and unprecedented flooding. Climate chaos is here, and we have to act now to save lives and livelihoods from catastrophe. This bill is the most significant piece of climate legislation ever passed through the U.S. Senate and finally puts us on a path to transition to clean and renewable energy. What’s more, this bill borrows from the strategy I laid out in my Good Jobs for 21st Century Energy Act to juice the creation of good, family-wage jobs as we’re transitioning to a greener future. This bill is a huge investment in a Made in America, union future for renewable energy in the United States. The bill is not perfect, and I particularly regret parts of it that encourage more climate-killing oil and gas infrastructure and that leave frontline communities vulnerable to the ensuing impacts. But overall, the bill does a lot to drive a fast transition from fossil to renewable energy, and that is a massive stride in the right direction.

“We’re taking on big corporations to finally deliver tax fairness for working Americans. Many huge corporations like Amazon pay little to no federal taxes. That’s outrageous. It’s time for big corporations who’ve benefited from Americans’ investments in education, infrastructure, research and so much more to pay their fair share. The 15% minimum corporate tax in the Inflation Reduction Act stops big corporations from exploiting loopholes to evade taxes, and it taxes stock buybacks to incentivize companies to invest in workers and expansion—not just lining the pockets of CEOs and shareholders. This means that we can pay for historic climate investments without raising taxes by a single dime on working Americans—and to do it all while reducing the deficit by $300 billion to help bring down inflation. This is economic justice for real American families who are suffering.

“It’s been a long road to get here—and our work most certainly doesn’t stop here—but today, Senate Democrats have delivered in a big way for the American people. In future years, I hope that we will be able to look back and see today’s vote as a major inflection point on climate action, both here in the United States and globally. Let’s keep moving forward and build on this work by putting our country on an emergency footing to combat the climate crisis—and let’s keep working to bring costs down for consumers, put workers over big corporations, and deliver a better future for all.”

The U.S. House of Representatives is expected to pass the Inflation Reduction Act in the coming days, sending it to President Biden’s desk to be signed into law.

As temperatures rise worldwide…

Emergency Preparedness Presentation
Extreme Heat Safety

The Newport 60+ Activity Center is pleased to announce an upcoming series of emergency preparedness presentations (one per month) by Del Lockwood, Emergency Preparedness Coordinator for the City of Newport. Mr. Lockwood has provided emergency preparedness for 22 years and has assisted with mass evacuations and sheltering for multiple types of emergencies.

The subject of the first presentation will be “Extreme Heat Safety,” which causes more deaths each year than hurricanes, lightning, tornadoes, earthquakes and floods COMBINED! Adults 65 and older are among those at highest risk.

The key to a resilient community is preparation! You are invited to join us on Wednesday, August 24, 2022, from 2:00 – 3:00 p.m. to learn what you can do to “Be Prepared…Not Scared.”

To register for this informative presentation, go online: www.newportoregon.gov/sc and click on the banner “Browse the catalog and register.” There you may view a listing of additional presentations, classes, trips and events. For more information, stop by the office located at 20 SE 2nd Street, Newport, OR, or call 541-265-9617.  Find us on Facebook-  www.facebook.com/NewportSeniorActivityCenter.

Climate Chaos is getting more powerful by the year – Time to fix it…

From massive wildfires and devastating floods, to record-breaking hurricanes and heat waves, we are clearly seeing the impacts of climate chaos across our nation and the world. As we wrap up another week of record high heat and face the continued threat of wildfire season here in Oregon, it’s clear we urgently need bold climate action.  

And this weekend, Congress took a historic step towards transitioning to clean, renewable energy, and to pump up American manufacturing and create good American jobs in the process.

Yesterday, I voted in favor of the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 (IRA), which will be the biggest piece of climate legislation ever enacted in the U.S. when it is signed into law. This historic investment is intended to bring down consumer energy costs, rapidly deploy renewable energy, increase American clean energy security, and substantially reduce carbon pollution—all while creating good-paying, Made in America jobs.

Specifically, the climate elements of the Inflation Reduction Act of 2022 will:  

  • Rapidly deploy renewable energy and increase American energy security through policies to support energy reliability and cleaner production coupled with historic investments in American clean energy manufacturing to lessen our reliance on China and ensure that the transition to a clean economy creates millions of American manufacturing jobs and is powered by American-made clean technologies.  
  • Lower energy costs for Americans through policies that will lower prices at the pump and on electricity bills, help consumers afford technologies that will lower emissions and energy prices, and reduce costs that would otherwise be passed on to them.  
  • Invest in decarbonizing all sectors of the economy through targeted federal support of innovative climate solutions.  
  • Focus investments into disadvantaged communities to ensure that communities that are too-often left behind will share in the benefits of the transition to a clean economy. 
  • Support resilient rural communities by investing in farmers and forestland owners to be part of growing climate solutions, and by ensuring rural communities are able to better adapt to a rapidly changing climate.  
  • Do all of this while incentivizing good, union jobs and investing in a Made in America future for clean and renewable energy.   

A summary and breakdown of the Energy Security and Climate Change Investments can be found here.

Cleaning up our highways and freeways


Funded projects to help reduce diesel emissions across the state

Statewide, OR—As part of its continuing efforts to improve air quality, the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality today announced recipients of nearly $7.5 million in funding for projects designed to reduce diesel emissions across the state and among vulnerable populations. Under the Diesel Emissions Mitigation Grant Program , eight selected projects will help eliminate air contaminants affecting public health and climate by retrofitting or replacing older medium- and heavy-duty diesel equipment with new, cleaner alternatives.

The selected projects will remove more than 38 tons of harmful air pollution, including nitrogen oxide and fine particulate matter, from Oregon’s air. Projects range from retiring an old diesel transit trolley and purchasing a new, all-electric one in Wilsonville to replacing two diesel refuse trucks with one all-electric and one compressed natural gas hauler in Athena, to installing diesel particulate filters and replacing medium- and heavy-duty diesel trucks with zero-emission transportation in the Portland Metro area and across the state.

350 East Olive, Newport

“In its second year, the Diesel Emissions Mitigation Grant Program continues to encourage businesses and government organizations to commit to cleaner air,” said DEQ Air Quality Division Administrator Ali Mirzakhalili. “DEQ offers many programs in addition to this grant to support the reduction of transportation-related emissions. The goal is to help transition light-, medium- and heavy-duty vehicles to zero emissions throughout Oregon.”

2022 recipients and awards are as follows:
• Recipient: All Service Moving
Primary Location: Portland
Project: Replace 10 older, medium- and heavy-duty diesel trucks with 10 all-electric trucks and add charging stations.
Grant Amount: $1,553,850

• Recipient: City of Newberg
Primary Location: Newberg
Project: Replace two diesel trucks with one, all-electric truck.
Grant Amount: $682,500

• Recipient: City of Portland
Primary Location: Portland
Project: Replace five diesel, materials and equipment trucks with five that are all-electric.
Grant Amount: $850,000

• Recipient: Humbert Refuse
Primary Location: Athena
Project: Replace two diesel refuse trucks with one all-electric hauler and one compressed natural gas hauler.
Grant Amount: $718,501

• Recipient: Iron Oxen
Primary Location: Portland
Project: Replace a combination of five diesel drayage trucks with five all-electric drayage trucks.
Grant Amount: $2,041,063

• Recipient: MTRWestern
Primary Location: Portland
Project: Replace two diesel MCI J4500 motor coaches, powered by Model Year 2006 engines, with two all-electric motor coaches.
Grant Amount: $1,194,936

• Recipient: R.A. Anderson Group, LLC
Primary Location: Estacada
Project: Retrofit one dump truck, currently with a Model Year 2001 diesel engine, with a diesel particulate filter meeting Clean Air Construction Standard requirements.
Grant Amount: $28,364

• Recipient: South Metro Area Regional Transit/City of Wilsonville
Primary Location: Wilsonville
Project: Replace a 21-year-old diesel transit trolley with an ADA-accessible, all-electric trolley.
Grant Amount: $412,500

2022 Grant Amount Total: $7,481,714

DEQ’s Air Quality Program staff reviewed 61 grant applications, totaling $42 million in requested funds. Using a point system, they applied specific criteria from the Oregon Legislature and related administrative rules to evaluate proposed projects.

Project location criterion included a GIS evaluation against a vulnerable population map . The review considered how a proposed project would improve air quality in areas with the highest diesel emissions, most vulnerable populations and highest population densities.

DEQ has approximately $40 million from the Environmental Mitigation Trust Fund established after Volkswagen was found to have cheated on emissions standards. The agency will award approximately $8 million in grants per year for five consecutive calendar years, beginning in 2021 and ending in 2025. In response to inflation and cost increases for vehicles and equipment, DEQ may choose to increase individual award amounts as needed to ensure Oregon receives the maximum air quality benefits from these projects.

About the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality
The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality protects human health and the environment by controlling air and water pollution, reducing the impacts of manufactured products and cleaning up contaminated properties. DEQ engages the public in decision-making and helps communities solve problems in ways that are economically and environmentally sustainable.

Media Contact:
Susan C. Mills, DEQ public affairs specialist, Susan.Mills@deq.oregon.gov, 503-956-9648

Monkey-pox sneaking around the west coast…

Governor Kate Brown

Governor Kate Brown Urges Oregonians to Take Precautions to Prevent Spread of the Human Monkeypox Virus.  State agencies are committing all available resources to protect communities at highest risk for Monkeypox.

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today urged Oregonians to take precautions to prevent the spread of the virus, more commonly known as the Monkeypox virus. She issued the following statement:

“In the last two-and-a-half years, whether during the COVID-19 pandemic, wildfires, or natural disasters, Oregonians have shown time and again that we step up to help keep our friends, neighbors, and loved ones safe.

“The Monkeypox virus is spreading in our communities and it is time for us again to help protect each other. Monkeypox is a virus that can impact anyone. Viruses spread regardless of your background, zip code, income level, race, religion, gender, or sexual orientation––anyone can be infected. Period. We are all very much in this together.

“At the same time, our public health experts are following the science and data to make sure that testing and contact tracing resources, vaccines, and information are reaching the populations of Oregonians that are at highest risk. In the current outbreak, the most impacted communities have included gay, bisexual, and other men who have sex with men.

“We have an ugly history in this country of ignoring diseases that primarily impact the LGBTQ+ community. I remember the early days of the HIV epidemic, when a generation of gay men was dying and the government did not seem to care. It took years before there was general recognition from the public that HIV, like all viruses, spreads indiscriminately.

“Fortunately, we know much more about how to protect ourselves from Monkeypox. It is rarely fatal, and there are already effective tests to diagnose the disease among people with symptoms. There are also safe and effective vaccines for those at highest risk of the disease, as well as safe and effective treatments for those at highest risk of severe disease––which is why it is so critical for the federal government to distribute them quickly.

“I am urging all Oregonians to take steps to protect themselves and others from the virus. If you’re planning to attend a festival, concert, party, or other event, consider the amount of close, personal and skin-to-skin contact that may occur. If you are feeling sick and have symptoms like a new rash, avoid close skin-to-skin contact, and call your health care provider or 2-1-1 if you think you may have been exposed.

“If you are scared, if you feel like no one cares––know that Governor Brown stands with you. Know that you are not alone. The federal government is speeding up the purchase and distribution of vaccines nationwide. And, Governor Brown is working with the state’s local and federal partners to ensure vaccines, resources, and information are being distributed as quickly as possible. This is Oregon, and we do not stand by when our neighbors need help.”

As of today, 89 people throughout Oregon are known or presumed to have contracted Monkeypox. The virus is spreading primarily through close or prolonged skin-to-skin contact, including through sex, cuddling, kissing or massage. Contact with towels, clothing or other objects used by someone with the virus can also spread the virus.

Earlier in the day, the Governor met with leaders of community-based organizations representing the communities at highest risk for the virus. OHA has been operating an Incident Management Team focused on Monkeypox for the last several weeks, guided by advice from a medical advisory panel composed of organizations serving Oregon’s most impacted communities.

For more information on Monkeypox or any other virus, the information is available on the Oregon Health Authority’s website.

                                                          15Neighborhoods.com

Break Out Your Sand Shovels…..

BEACHSIDE AND SOUTH BEACH STATE PARKS HOST AUGUST SAND CASTLE CONTESTS

Newport, Oregon—Bring your best ideas and creative skills to the annual sand castle contests at Beachside State Recreation Area, Aug. 13, and South Beach State Park, Aug. 27. Sign-ups begin at 10 a.m. in the day-use areas. 

The theme this year is 100 Years of Oregon State Parks and celebrate public beach access. Judges will evaluate entries based on creativity, originality and best use of beach resources added to the design. Judging for each event begins 12 p.m., followed by announcements of first, second, third and judges’ awards.

The parks have a few sand buckets for loan; however, contestants may bring other hand tools and supplies to build their sand creations.

Contact Park Ranger Supervisor Brian Fowler, 541-867-7451, for more information. 

Finally….doing the right thing for the right people…

Oregon surpasses goal to fund 1,000 permanent homes with supportive services for people experiencing homelessness

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon Housing and Community Services (OHCS) announced it has exceeded the 2019–2023 Oregon Statewide Housing Plan goal to fund 1,000 units of permanent supportive housing (PSH). The Housing Stability Council approved last week funding for almost 250 PSH homes. OHCS has now committed to funding 1,255 PSH homes, which is a year ahead of the scheduled target date of 2023. 

“Achieving this goal is a manifestation of collective galvanizing of the governor, Oregon Legislature, community partners, Tribal Nations, federal, state and local agencies, developers, local businesses, and local communities,” said OHCS Director Andrea Bell. “We do not accept homelessness as a fact of life. Investing in humane, dignified solutions that we know are effective is what the people of Oregon deserve and optimizes public funds. I am proud of what we have accomplished together. As we continue pushing forward, we are eager to learn, build, and advance solutions together.” 

Permanent supportive housing is an evidence-based model for supporting people and households experiencing homelessness. PSH is a nationally recognized strategy to address chronic homelessness. It provides deeply affordable and permanent housing with wraparound services to house people regardless of barriers they may face. 

Alder House, located in the heart of downtown Portland, is one example of what permanent supportive housing looks like in Oregon. Alder House provides 130 apartments for individuals earning low incomes, with 30 apartments designated as permanent supportive housing (PSH). All households receive supportive resident services to help build community and improve housing stability, and the 30 PSH households also receive intensive case management services. Alder House features a community room in which residents can organize events and convene with neighbors. 

In addition, it is near various transportation and grocery options, so people have easy access to their basic everyday needs. With a housing first approach, Alder House helps people get connected with the resources they need to stay stable in their homes and thrive in their communities. 

The work to build more PSH developments in Oregon continues given the magnitude of Oregon’s housing needs. Currently, there are nine PSH projects throughout the state participating in the 2022 OHCS Supportive Housing Institute. Moving forward, OHCS will continue to work alongside community and partners to find innovative and equity-centered solutions to help families who are experiencing homelessness. For more information about this work, visit the OHCS website.  

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Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

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Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

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