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Energy Report Outlines Benefits and Challenges to Floating Offshore Wind Off Oregon’s Coast

How, when and where. Wind Farms must be carefully analyzed first….

SALEM – Floating offshore wind facilities could help Oregon achieve its clean energy goals but face challenges ahead of potential deployment off the state’s coast, according to a new report by the Oregon Department of Energy.

The first renewable offshore wind facilities came online in Denmark in the 1990s and have since been installed in shallow waters across the world. Now, experts are looking at how offshore wind facilities could be deployed in deeper waters by affixing wind turbine technology to floating platforms. Off the Oregon coast, which has some of the strongest wind resources in the world, deeper sea floors would require floating offshore wind technology.

The Oregon Legislature directed ODOE to conduct a study outlining the benefits and challenges of integrating up to 3 gigawatts of floating offshore wind into Oregon’s grid by 2030. The agency’s study provides a summary of important information and key findings from a review of existing literature; consultation with other state, regional, and national experts; and thoughtful feedback from Oregon stakeholders over the past year.

The study found that floating offshore wind could bring compelling benefits to the state, including helping Oregon achieve its clean energy goals, strengthening grid reliability and resilience, and bolstering economic development in coastal communities, among others. The study also acknowledges significant challenges, including concerns about the effects potential offshore wind development could have on coastal communities, the environment, natural and cultural resources, and existing coastal industries like fishing, recreation, and tourism; technology, transmission system, and port infrastructure readiness; and complex siting and permitting challenges.

“Like all energy technologies, floating offshore wind development would carry important tradeoffs for Oregon,” said ODOE Director Janine Benner. “We hope our study provides policy and decisionmakers with helpful background and expert analysis as they continue conversations around how floating offshore wind could help Oregon reach our clean energy and climate goals.”

While a thorough literature review and robust expert and stakeholder input provided a strong foundation for ODOE’s study, it also made clear there is a need for further study, engagement, and collaboration to more fully understand how floating offshore wind could affect the state. In particular, stakeholders urged additional regional and local collaboration to find a balance between the benefits and challenges of deploying this technology. The potential benefits are compelling, but it is critical that the effects on existing economies, cultures, communities, and the environment are carefully assessed and mitigated where necessary.

ODOE’s complete study, background materials, and stakeholder feedback are available on the agency’s website. Call Jennifer Ka
Jennifer Kalez, 503-480-9239

The Oregon Department of Energy helps Oregonians improve the energy efficiency of their homes, provides policy expertise to prepare for Oregon’s future energy needs, staffs the Energy Facility Siting Council, provides technical and financial assistance to encourage investments in energy efficiency and renewable energy resources, promotes the cleanup of the Hanford nuclear site, and ensures state preparedness to respond to emergencies at energy facilities.

Big Bucks Creates a New Park in Lincoln City

Lincoln City Parks & Recreation receives $750k from Oregon Parks & Recreation Dept. for new Park!

Lincoln City Parks & Recreation (LCP&R) is receiving $750k from the Oregon Parks and Recreation Dept (OPRD) for the continued development of a new 6.71 acre community park in the historic Taft District of Lincoln City. This recent funding was granted by the OPRD Commission this past Wed.

The $750k assists in the funding of the first community park to be built in Lincoln City in close to two decades, while also being the first community park in the historic Taft District (southern area of Lincoln City) alone. The current park conceptual plan includes new turfed and surfaced multi-sport fields and courts, a large covered outdoor special event area which can convert to multi-sport courts, picnic shelters, restrooms, playground, and an accessible walking path around the park.

“We are so excited!” said LCP&R Director Jeanne Sprague. “Thank you to OPRD for understanding the value and need of a new community park in Lincoln City. This new park will offer health, wellness and many other benefits to our residents, visitors, and local economy. This OPRD funding is getting us to our goal of park construction.”

The OPRD funding is a huge boost to Lincoln City Parks, coupled with LCP&R receiving $1 million in State of Oregon funding this year from OR House Bill 5202 for development of the new park. State Rep. David Gomberg, who represents District 10 in the Oregon Legislature, worked collaboratively with district staff, LCP&R staff and the LCP&R Advisory Board to champion funding for the new Park.

Representative Gomberg states: “I’m convinced the new Community Park in LC will become a staple of this community, providing much-needed recreational space, opportunities for our kids, and new business opportunities for the Central Coast. This is a visionary use of the space and we’ll see the results for decades to come.”

Sprague agrees, saying “The voices in our community have asked to have this park built, we’re listening and we’re moving towards the goal line. The building of this community park in Taft is needed, public sports fields, sports courts and special event areas are needed, all of which will support our local economy.”

Since 2008, Lincoln City had been in talks with the Lincoln County School District (LCSD) to acquire the 6.71 acres, to build a park where the former Taft Elementary once stood. In anticipation of the park, the Lincoln City Urban Renewal Agency built a public parking lot with 61 spaces directly to the west of the park area. In December 2020, Lincoln City was able to purchase the land from LCSD for $422k.

In preparation for final park design, LCP&R in partnership with Lincoln City Public Works are completing land surveys on the park land, along with final demolition of the decommissioned Taft school maintenance shop. Phased steps include finalizing the park landscape design, utilizing the current park conceptual plan, and then breaking ground on construction. Public open houses on the park landscape design are planned to start this Winter 2023, offering the public an opportunity to voice their wants in park amenities. This design will provide estimates of costs, allowing Lincoln City to phase the construction of the new park in accordance to available funding and budget.

Sprague is hoping that phased construction can start in late 2023 and/or 2024. “Pending funding, we will build park amenities as we’re able. For example, we may need to start with construction of restrooms, playgrounds, or covered shelters, and build on from there.”

These park funds come from a voter approved, State lottery funded grant program administrated by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Typically, the program awards over $5 million annually to qualified projects, and has awarded over $60 million in grant funding since the program began in 1999. This year, OPRD allocated $25.2 million in grant funds for 24 proposals from cities, counties and parks districts from across Oregon. Lincoln City’s project ranked 13th of the 47 applications.

For continued updates on the new community park development in Lincoln City, see https://www.lincolncity.org/departments/parks-recreation/new-community-park-taft.

Keeping Oregon as safe and as green as possible…

United States Senate   

September 15, 2022 

Contact: Molly Prescott (Merkley) – 971-203-6027 

Contact: Hank Stern (Wyden) – 503-326-7539 

Merkley, Wyden: $350,000 in Pollution Prevention Planning Headed to Oregon

Washington, D.C. – Oregon’s U.S. Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden today announced the Environmental Protection Agency has awarded the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality $350,000 to implement two pollution prevention projects in the state. These awards are intended to help states and tribes provide businesses with technical assistance to help develop and adopt practices to prevent or reduce pollution before it is created, while reducing business and liability costs.

“When you turn on the tap or open your window, you deserve to know that the water and air aren’t going to compromise your health,” said Merkley. “This federal award will help provide financial support for crucial pollution prevention measures around Oregon. I look forward to seeing our businesses, families, and communities benefit from these projects.”

“Clean air and clean water are essential for communities throughout Oregon to thrive,” Wyden said. “I’m gratified our state has secured this federal investment to prevent pollution and build an even stronger and healthier quality of life for Oregonians.”

Oregon’s funded award will allow the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to deliver technical assistance on the following projects:

  1. The P2 Internship Program that places paid students with businesses to conduct on-site P2 research
  2. The Metals Manufacturing Outreach Initiative, which promotes source reduction within the metals manufacturing sector, and
  3. The Product Certification Assistance Program that will assist business to obtain the EPA Safer Choice label or add chemicals to the Safer Chemical Ingredient List.

The funds will also allow The Oregon DEQ to Conduct on-site, P2 technical assistance assessments in order to enhance Oregon’s EcoBiz certification program and support a regional green chemistry collaboration initiative.

Good Advice from our Sheriff Curtis Landers

September 15, 2022

Sheriff Curtis Landers
Lincoln County

Sheriff Curtis Landers

541-265-0652

clanders@co.lincoln.or.us

 

SAFETY TIPS DURING HUNTING SEASON

Hunters:

  • Check weather reports before visiting the forest.  Dress properly.
  • Tell someone where you will be hunting and when you will return.  Leave a written plan at home and in your vehicle.
  • Be familiar with the area you want to hunt.
  • Consider using electronic technology such as a handheld GPS or an app on your cell phone that uses the GPS built into your phone. Such phone applications like, onXmaps. Personal locating beacons (PLBs) or Satellite Messengers are another electronic that will assist searchers in finding you if you are lost or injured.
  • Avoid wearing white or tan during hunting seasons.  Wearing hunter orange, viewable from all directions is recommended.
  • If accompanied by a dog, the dog should also wear hunter orange or a very visible color on a vest, leash, coat or bandana.
  • Check hunting equipment before and after each outing and maintain it properly. Familiarize yourself with its operation before using it in the field.
  • Carry a spare set of dry clothing.  Use layering techniques to prevent moisture while retaining body warmth. Always bring rain gear.
  • Carry a first aid kit and know how to use its contents.
  • Clearly identify your target before shooting.  Prevent unfortunate accidents or fatalities.
  • Be alert when hunting near developed areas and trails.  Other recreationists are in the forest as well.

Outdoor Enthusiasts:

  • Wear bright clothing.  Make yourself more visible. Choose colors that stand out, like red, orange or green, and avoid white, blacks, browns, earth-toned greens and animal-colored clothing. Orange vests and hats are advisable.
  • Don’t forget to protect your dog.  Get an orange vest for him/her if they accompany you.
  • Be courteous.  Once a hunter is aware of your presence, don’t make unnecessary noise to disturb wildlife. Avoid confrontations.
  • Make yourself known.  If you do hear shooting, raise your voice and let hunters know that you are in the vicinity.
  • Know when hunting seasons are occurring.  Continue to hike, but learn about where and when hunting is taking place. (Consider hiking midday when wild game and hunting activity is at its lowest.)
  • Know your own comfort level.  If hunting makes you uneasy, choose a hiking location where hunting is not allowed, such as a national or state park.

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and “Like” us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

It’s Solve Fall Beach and Riverside Coastal Cleanup Day!!

A reminder that THIS Saturday, September 17th at 10 am is the annual SOLVE Fall Beach and Riverside Cleanup! The Newport Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation is hosting 5 beach cleanup sites.Thanks to support from our partners at @Stasherbag, the first 50 volunteers to arrive will receive a free, reusable Stasher bag to take home. 
Click on any of the sites below to register on the SOLVE website:
We have very low enrollment numbers for the Otter Rock site, please consider signing up to volunteer! 
Saturday, September 24th @ 9 am
Join us for a Highway 101 cleanup in partnership with the Oregon Hang Gliders Association on Saturday, September 24th from 9 am to 11 am! Volunteers are needed to pick up trash along a two-mile section of Highway 101 north of Newport 
starting at the Moolack Beach Parking area. Volunteers are asked to bring clothing appropriate for the weather, trash grabber, and reusable gloves if they have them. Surfrider provides bags, single-use gloves, grabbers, and a high visibility vest.
Thank you all!
Megan Hoff, Volunteer | Beach Cleanup Coordinator
Newport Chapter of Surfrider Foundation

News Reporter still looking for a small dwelling space in Newport –

Incredibly beautiful
Rudy Montoya photo

There’s been many beautiful seasons to enjoy up and down the many coast-lines that beautify the Newport-Lincoln County environment. I adore it – it’s my favorite.  I’ve always loved that part of the coast and I keep coming back to it.  And I’ve convinced myself that although I do a pretty good job of digging up, laying out and explaining the many news stories for the visitors and long-term permanent people who work and live here…there’s always something new, novel, exciting and breathtaking when those Pacific waves and the blustery winds come ashore.

As most of us deeply realize, the Newport area is a beautiful place, and as I mentioned, it’s jam-packed on a summer-time day and I long to be apart of it again.  If anyone has a spacious enough home I would love to meet anyone who wants to rent out one of their “internal (or external) dwelling units.” I’d be a happy tenant who loves the area and renew my love of Newport.  I’ve been a news reporter for major television stations, radio stations and even newspapers up and down the west coast.  It’s been my way of life and I’m still at it.

Anyone reading this “mini saga” is truly invited to drop me a letter or send an e-mail to News@NewsLincolnCounty.com.  Maybe a telephone call If I could to get to know you as you might like to know me.  I’m good at what I do.  My phone number is 541-351-1408.

                                                                      Thank you for your time…D.Morgan, Carson City, NV

Port of Toledo Board of Commissioners – Sept. 20, 2022

REGULAR MEETING

Port of Toledo Board of Commissioners September 20, 2022; Tuesday, 6:00 pm

AGENDA

Regular meeting of the Port of Toledo Board of Commissioners

3) Introduction of Visitors/Visitor Comments: Limited to 5 minutes per visitor (6:05 – 6:10)

  1. 4)  Approval of Minutes: (6:10 – 6:15)
  2. 5)  Manager’s Report: (6:15 – 6:45)
  3. 6)  Discussion Items: (6:45 – 7:00)
  4. 7)  Decision Items:(7:00 – 7:15)

Regular Meeting, August 16, 2022

Debbie Scacco, Port Manager Financial Report

Approve & Pay Bills Shipyard Report Maintenance Report
Grant Project Updates Permitting/Dredge Updates Wooden Boat Show Upcoming Conferences

COLI Consideration
Presented by Debbie Scacco, Port Manager

Presented by Debbie Scacco, Port Manager:

Consider Adoption of Resolution 2022-8
Designating Registered Agent and Registered Office

Consider Motion to add Debbie Scacco as an authorized signer to the Port’s Bank Accounts at Oregon Coast Bank, Bank of the West, and for the Local Government Investment Pool, removing Lorna Davis’s signature authority, effective immediately.

Consider Motion to authorize Oregon Coast Bank to issue credit card to Debbie Scacco for work use and cancelling credit card issued to Lorna Davis, effective immediately.

Regular monthly meetings are scheduled for the third Tuesday of every month at 6:00 pm.

The Port of Toledo’s conference room is accessible to people with disabilities. A request for an interpreter for the hearing impaired or for other accommodations for persons with disabilities should be made at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting to Port of Toledo’s Office at 541-336-5207.

Google Map for 496 NE Hwy 20

  1. 8)  Commissioners Comments (7:15 – 7:30)
  2. 9)  Upcoming Meetings:

10) Adjourn (7:30)

City of Toledo, September 21, 6:00 pm
Toledo Planning Commission – October 12, 7:00 pm
Next Port of Toledo Commission Meeting – October 18, 6:00 pm

Governor Brown asks for assistance in knocking down huge wild fires across Oregon!!

Governor Kate Brown
“We’re under a major threat from forest fires…”

Governor Kate Brown Statement on Oregon’s Request for a Federal Emergency Declaration for Wildfires

If granted, Oregon would be the first state to receive direct assistance under a Presidential Emergency Declaration for wildfires 
 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown issued the following statement today on her request to President Joseph R. Biden, Jr., to approve a federal emergency declaration for the State of Oregon — under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act — due to extreme risk of significant wildfires:

“Last week, as Oregon faced predicted high winds, sustained hot and dry conditions, and the potential for lightning — and with 168,000 acres burning across the state at the time — Oregonians braced for increased and worsening fires. State firefighting teams and agencies, along with local partners and resources brought in from California and Washington through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, mobilized to prepare for a swift response and to protect lives, communities, and our natural resources.

“Thanks to science and data, we know enough in the days ahead of anticipated weather and fire patterns — just like states that prepare for hurricanes — that it is imperative to communicate with the public, pre-position resources for our fire response, and employ preventive measures, such as public safety power shut-offs. All of these efforts reflect a modernized approach to meeting the needs of fighting the fires of this century; they are proactive measures that we can take to protect communities and save lives.

“The request I made for a federal disaster declaration is critical to helping bolster our state’s response, and it presents an opportunity for Oregon to partner with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to bridge the gaps we know exist as we work hard to protect our communities. We still have several weeks of peak fire season ahead of us, five large active fires, and 274,000 acres burning statewide. If granted, Oregon would be the first state ever to receive such a declaration for wildfire response — but unfortunately, certainly not the last to need this important assistance.

“I am incredibly grateful for the strong partnership we have with the Biden-Harris administration and with FEMA, with whom we have worked over the past several years on various emergencies. I urge their earnest consideration of my request so that, together, we can protect Oregonians and our communities, and serve as a model of federal support for states facing the ongoing threat of wildfires.”

It’s “Banned Books Week” September 18-24!!

2022 Banned Books Week:
Banned Books Trivia at Bier One

(NEWPORT – Staff at the Newport Public Library is excited to announce that the Library is celebrating Banned Books Week! Banned Books Week takes place from September 18-24th. The theme of Banned Books Week 2022 is “Books Unite Us, Censorship Divides Us.”  As part of our efforts to celebrate, the Newport Public Library will host Banned Books Trivia on Tuesday, September 20th from 5:30-7:30 pm at Bier One, 255 SW 9th Street Newport, OR 97365. Put together a team or join a team or play trivia on your own. There will be prizes for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place.

Banned Books Trivia is free, open to the public and proudly sponsored by the Newport Public Library Foundation, Newport Public Library, and Bier One. This event is free, open to the public and all ages are welcome.  For more information, please visit www.newportlibrary.org/dept/lib/bannedbooks2022.asp<http://www.newportlibrary.org/dept/lib/bannedbooks2022.asp>  or call 541-265-2153. For more information about Banned Books Week, please visit: www.bannedbooksweek.org<http://www.bannedbooksweek.org/>

Oregon declares a Federal Emergency Declaration for Wildfires

Governor Kate Brown…better times are coming…

Governor Kate Brown Statement on Oregon’s Request for a Federal Emergency Declaration for Wildfires

If granted, Oregon would be the first state to receive direct assistance under a Presidential Emergency Declaration for wildfires 
 

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown issued the following statement today on her requestto President Joseph R. Biden, Jr., to approve a federal emergency declaration for the State of Oregon — under the Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act — due to extreme risk of significant wildfires:

“Last week, as Oregon faced forecasted high winds, sustained hot and dry conditions, and the potential for lightning — and with 168,000 acres burning across the state at the time — Oregonians braced for increased and worsening fires. State firefighting teams and agencies, along with local partners and resources brought in from California and Washington through the Emergency Management Assistance Compact, mobilized to prepare for a swift response and to protect lives, communities, and our natural resources.

“Thanks to science and data, we know enough in the days ahead of anticipated weather and fire patterns — just like states that prepare for hurricanes — that it is imperative to communicate with the public, pre-position resources for our fire response, and employ preventive measures, such as public safety power shut-offs. All of these efforts reflect a modernized approach to meeting the needs of fighting the fires of this century; they are proactive measures that we can take to protect communities and save lives.

“The request I made for a federal disaster declaration is critical to helping bolster our state’s response, and it presents an opportunity for Oregon to partner with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) to bridge the gaps we know exist as we work hard to protect our communities. We still have several weeks of peak fire season ahead of us, five large active fires, and 274,000 acres burning statewide. If granted, Oregon would be the first state ever to receive such a declaration for wildfire response — but unfortunately, certainly not the last to need this important assistance.

“I am incredibly grateful for the strong partnership we have with the Biden-Harris administration and with FEMA, with whom we have worked over the past several years on various emergencies. I urge their earnest consideration of my request so that, together, we can protect Oregonians and our communities, and serve as a model of federal support for states facing the ongoing threat of wildfires.”

 

It’s all happenin’ at the Newport Library!!

The Newport Public Library is please to announce the return of Youth Programming, starting in October 2022! We will be reintroducing our weekly programs for the youngest of our Library friends, Toddler Time, Preschool Storytime, and Bilingual Preschool Storytime.

Our weekly programming will begin Tuesday, October 4 at 10:30 a.m. with Toddler Time, hosted by Linda Annable our Youth Services Supervisor. Toddler Time is geared for children 0-3 and their adults, older children are welcome to join as well. Each session features books, songs, and stories chosen especially for our youngest Library visitors. The relaxed, welcoming environment gives toddlers a wonderful introduction to the joys of reading and all that the Library has to offer. Come visit us on Tuesdays for a romping time in our Children’s Room at Toddler Time!

On Wednesdays, starting October 5, Vanessa Clausing, our Youth Services Librarian, will host Preschool Storytime at 10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime gently introduces preschoolers, ages 3-5, to the skills they need to become successful readers and successful classroom participants. Children will enjoy books, stories, songs, rhymes and crafts at each session. Adults are encouraged to participate with their children and enjoy all that the Library has to offer before and after Storytime.

Each Thursday, beginning October 6, join Rachel Diego Leon, our Bilingual Community Resource Specialist and Linda Annable, for Bilingual Preschool Storytime – presented in both Spanish and English at 5:30 p.m. This program is very much like Preschool Storytime, however we use both English and Spanish for each story presented. All are welcome regardless of your native language. Our focus is on preschoolers, but we encourage all family members to attend.

We will also be hosting monthly events for youth at the Library. Teen Third Thursday events, geared for 6th – 12th graders, start October 20 at 4:00 p.m. And, a new program we are especially excited about is a monthly LEGO® event First Friday Family LEGO® Fun, once a month from 2:30-4:30 p.m. October’s date is Friday the 7th. This monthly event will not have a Library host; parents, adults or an older sibling will need to accompany children under the age of 10.

All of these Library events are free to participants and no registration is necessary. We will provide everything needed for all of these events. You just bring yourself and/or your kiddos. We hope to see you here for one, or more, of our regular Youth Services Programs starting October 4th.

If you have any questions please email us at reference@newportlibrary.org or call the Newport Public Library at 541-265-2153.

Newport Public Library celebrates Library Card Sign-up Month with Idina Menzel and Cara Mentzel

(NEWPORT, OREGON) – September is Library Card Sign-up Month, when libraries nationwide join the American Library Association (ALA) to remind parents, caregivers, and students that signing up for a library card is the first step on the path to academic achievement and lifelong learning.

Libraries play a crucial role in the education and development of children, offering a variety of programs to spark creativity and stimulate an interest in reading and learning.

At the Newport Public Library, patrons of all ages can find a variety of educational resources and activities, including Banned Books Jeopardy, Banned Books Trivia Night at Bier One, Banned Books Tiny Art Show, Banned Books Library Card Design Contest, Spanish Movie Night, 2022 Newport Public Library Summer Music Series, and much more.

“Libraries play an important role in the education and development of children,” says Laura Kimberly, Newport Public Library Director. “We have library programs that serve students of all ages and backgrounds such as Teen Third Thursday, a variety of storytime programs, First Friday Family Legos, Fourth Friday Family Loteria, author talks, and much more.

This year, Tony Award-winning performer, actress, singer-songwriter, and philanthropist Idina Menzel (Frozen, Wicked) and her sister, author and educator Cara Mentzel, will serve as honorary chairs of Library Card Sign-Up Month. Idina and Cara are excited to remind everyone that one of the best places to find your voice is at the library. 

Through access to technology, media resources and educational programs, a library card gives students the tools to succeed in the classroom and provides people of all ages and opportunities to pursue their dreams, explore new passions and interests, and find their voice.

Library Card Sign-Up Month, they want us to explore all the library has to offer, like new children’s books, access to technology, and educational programming.

The Newport Public Library, along with libraries everywhere, continue to adapt and expand services to meet the evolving community needs. To sign up for a library card or to learn more about the library’s resources and programs, please visit www.newportpubliclibrary.org or call 541-265-2153.

The Newport Public Library is please to announce the return of Youth Programming, starting in October 2022!  We will be reintroducing our weekly programs for the youngest of our Library friends, Toddler Time, Preschool Storytime, and Bilingual Preschool Storytime.

Our weekly programming will begin Tuesday, October 4 at 10:30 a.m. with Toddler Time, hosted by Linda Annable our Youth Services Supervisor. Toddler Time is geared for children 0-3 and their adults, older children are welcome to join as well. Each session features books, songs, and stories chosen especially for our youngest Library visitors. The relaxed, welcoming environment gives toddlers a wonderful introduction to the joys of reading and all that the Library has to offer. Come visit us on Tuesdays for a romping time in our Children’s Room at Toddler Time!

On Wednesdays, starting October 5, Vanessa Clausing, our Youth Services Librarian, will host Preschool Storytime at 10:30 a.m. Preschool Storytime gently introduces preschoolers, ages 3-5, to the skills they need to become successful readers and successful classroom participants. Children will enjoy books, stories, songs, rhymes and crafts at each session. Adults are encouraged to participate with their children and enjoy all that the Library has to offer before and after Storytime.

Each Thursday, beginning October 6, join Rachel Diego Leon, our Bilingual Community Resource Specialist and Linda Annable, for Bilingual Preschool Storytime – presented in both Spanish and English at 5:30 p.m. This program is very much like Preschool Storytime, however we use both English and Spanish for each story presented. All are welcome regardless of your native language. Our focus is on preschoolers, but we encourage all family members to attend.

We will also be hosting monthly events for youth at the Library. Teen Third Thursday events, geared for 6th – 12th graders, start October 20 at 4:00 p.m. And, a new program we are especially excited about is a monthly LEGO® event First Friday Family LEGO® Fun, once a month from 2:30-4:30 p.m. October’s date is Friday the 7th. This monthly event will not have a Library host; parents, adults or an older sibling will need to accompany children under the age of 10.

All of these Library events are free to participants and no registration is necessary. We will provide everything needed for all of these events. You just bring yourself and/or your kiddos. We hope to see you here for one, or more, of our regular Youth Services Programs starting October 4th.  If you have any questions please email us at reference@newportlibrary.org or call the Newport Public Library at 541-265-2153.

Oregon Nurses Association wants to form a union at Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital

Contact: Mary Jo Kerlin, Marketing & Communications Strategist, Lincoln County
Lincoln City: 541-557-6208 Newport: 541-574-4898 Mobile: 541-921-9045

Samaritan Pacific Hospital- on the grow…

Samaritan North Lincoln clarifies union statement

(Sept. 13, 2022 – Lincoln City, Oregon) – The Oregon Nurses Association recently issued a press release concerning efforts to form a union at Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital, and hospital officials wish to clarify some of the information.

“Our nurses have the right to a secret ballot election to decide whether to unionize. However, the information they, and the public, are receiving from union officials may be incomplete and inaccurate,” said CEO Lesley Ogden, MD.

The ONA release said a nurses union will help address burnout, understaffing, safe patient care and ensure that nurses will have a voice in decision making that impacts their working conditions and wages.

“It is not my place to comment on how a union would hope to accomplish this, but I can respond to what Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital has done to address these important matters,” Dr. Ogden said.

Staffing: Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital has expanded the number of employed nurses during the past year. When there is a vacant nursing position, where a replacement nurse is not immediately found, it is filled with a temporary contract nurse until the position can be filled permanently.

As a direct result of feedback from the hospital’s nurse staffing committee, the hospital added nursing positions in the medical/surgical unit and emergency departments and charge nurse positions in the emergency department. The hospital has standardized the practice of having two nurses on shift at all times in labor and delivery and in the intensive care unit regardless of patient census. The upgraded staffing plan in all units creates redundancy of skills and helps to cover breaks.

Patient safety and quality care: These are mandated by state and federal regulations. Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital consistently achieves high quality ratings in these areas from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services as well as from a contracted patient survey company.

Also related to these topics, a patient acuity tool has been put in place to give nurses an objective way to understand a patient’s medical complexity in real time. This enables nurse management to assign an appropriate number of patients to each nurse on duty to ensure that safe and quality care can be given to each patient under each nurse’s care.

Employee satisfaction: Data from the most recent employee engagement survey shows a high response rate and positive scores that are much higher than the national average in areas that directly contradict some of the points made in the ONA statement. These areas include questions about respect, patient safety and business ethics. The highest score was the ranking on the statement, ‘”My ideas and suggestions are seriously considered.”

Decision making: The nurses at Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital have many opportunities to participate in committees that impact their workplace, work conditions and the way care is delivered. This encourages employee engagement and transparency of decision making. Along with the nurse staffing committee mentioned above, other ways employees’ voices can be heard include:

  • Monthly departmental staff meetings led by department managers.
  • Monthly Town Hall meetings led by the hospital’s vice president of Patient Care Services during both day and night shifts; these are recorded so everyone has the opportunity to either attend virtually or watch later.
  • Monthly CEO Q&A sessions held virtually and that are also recorded for viewing by those unable to attend the live session.
  • Sending ideas, comments and questions directly to the hospital’s executive team.Wages, benefits and other pay: The ONA release stated that nurses at Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital are not unionized, yet nurses at other Samaritan hospitals are, including those at nearby Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in Newport. However, with or without union representation, compensation is nearly equivalent between the two coastal hospitals.
  • The two hospital sites developed their pay scales independently in the past, so the step rates are not identical, but are very close. Step rates are the pay rates calculated based on years of experience and education. Nurses at both hospitals earn an additional hourly wage differential based on education level (MSN or BSN) and certain specified certifications. Other benefits, such as the education stipend, are also equal between the two hospitals.
  • “A differential for education level (MSN, BSN, or specific certifications) was specifically cited in a recent email by union organizers who say it was only put in place when administration heard of the unionization efforts, but the reality is that the inequity was discovered and corrected earlier this summer, unrelated to organizing efforts,” said Dr. Ogden.Because North Lincoln is the smallest of Samaritan Health Services’ five hospitals and last-minute staffing is more challenging for this rural hospital, additional pay is available for North Lincoln nurses who pick up last-minute shift requests.“We follow our values statement that specifically calls out respect for all and we take this very seriously,” Dr. Ogden said. “While we do have business goals and some years are more challenging than others, as a community-based, nonprofit critical access hospital, we remain consistently focused on our mission of building healthier communities together.”

One way to head off terrible damage during a wildfire…

Time to master the obvious….

Coping with wind, rain and lots more…

Protect yourself and your family from health effects of wildfires and related power

shut-offs…


Help is available for those struggling with trauma caused by wildfires

For many people in Oregon, dealing with the wildfires has been especially difficult.

For those directly affected by the fires and evacuations, these traumatic events can bring feelings of stress, anxiety, grief, worry and anger. Even those who were not directly affected by fires and evacuations this year but have experienced them in the past may feel these emotions again. Seeing news reports or images of current fires or hearing about fires affecting loved ones can drive feelings like anxiety and stress.

If you’d like to talk with someone or find mental health resources, remember, the Safe + Strong Helpline is only a call away: 1-800-923-HELP (4357).

Protect yourself and your family when smoke levels are high

Smoke levels can change rapidly depending on weather. Check current conditions on the Oregon Smoke Information Blog (http://ow.ly/hZmC50KFZn9), Oregon DEQ Air Quality Index (http://ow.ly/IWyx50KFZnf) or by downloading the free OregonAIR app (http://ow.ly/aqgW50KFZnc) on your smartphone.

Remember that cloth, dust and surgical masks do NOT protect from the harmful particles in smoke.

N95 or P100 respirators approved by NIOSH may offer protection, but they must be properly fitted and worn. They won’t work for everyone, especially children.

Here’s how you can protect yourself and your family when smoke levels are high:

          Stay inside if possible

  • Follow your breathing plan if you have one. Wildfires and pollution contain small particles that can make asthma and other chronic diseases worse.
  • Make sure you have enough medication and monitor your health. Call your health care provider if your asthma gets worse or you’re exposed to smoke.
  • If you can, create a cleaner air space.
    • Keep windows and doors closed.
    • Avoid strenuous outdoor activity.
    • If available, use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters in indoor ventilation systems or portable air purifiers.
    • You can also create a DIY Box fan filter: http://ow.ly/NYMB50KFZne
  • If you are unable to create a cleaner air space, many communities open cleaner air spaces during severe smoke events. In partnership with local officials and organizations, 211Info maintains a list of public cleaner air spaces. You can learn more about cleaner air spaces:
  • Dial 2-1-1 or 1-866-698-6155- available 24 hours a day.
  • Text your zip code to 898211 (TXT211) – available M-F from 9 a.m.- 5 p.m.
  • Check https://www.211info.org/
  • For more information on protecting your health during wildfires, visit http://ow.ly/CQIy50KFZnb.

If your power goes out during the fires, there are ways to keep your family safe

  • Refrigerated or frozen foods may not be safe to eat after the loss of power.
  • During power outages, keep your fridge and freezer doors closed as much as possible to keep the cold in.
  • Throw out perishable food in your refrigerator (meat, fish, cut fruits and vegetables, eggs, milk and any leftovers) after 4 hours without power. A freezer can stay cold for up to 48 hours, but any frozen perishable foods should be thrown away if they thawed. Never taste food to determine if it is safe to eat. When in doubt, throw it out.
  • Turn off and unplug all unnecessary electrical equipment. Unplugging your medical devices, appliances, computers and other sensitive electronics can protect them from damage when the power returns.
  • If you use a generator during the public safety power shutoff, never use it inside your home, basement or garage.
  • Run your generator more than 20 feet from any window, door or vent. Generators can produce carbon monoxide. When carbon monoxide builds up in enclosed or partially enclosed spaces, it can be lethal to people and animals.
  • When using a generator, use a battery-powered or battery backup CO detector in your home, especially in sleeping areas.

For more information, visit https://www.cdc.gov/disasters/poweroutage/needtoknow.html.

Get your prescriptions filled even in an emergency, preferably at a pharmacy  

Any pharmacy in Oregon can make an emergency prescription refill for a person who had to leave an area affected by a declared disaster.

  • It is preferred, and in some cases perhaps easier, to use the same company that filled the original prescription.
  • If the pharmacist believes the medicine is needed to maintain the patient’s health or to continue established treatment, the pharmacist can make a refill.
  • The emergency refill may be for no more than a 30-day supply.
  • Go to any pharmacy in Oregon, preferably one from the same company as the original fill and request an emergency 30-day refill.
  • A pharmacy will bill insurance as normal if you have insurance. There still may be an associated co-pay.
  • Reach out to their insurance company and work with your pharmacy to get the medications refilled and the costs covered. Call the state’s consumer advocates at 888-877-4894 if there are any issues.
  • If you don’t have insurance or have other questions about accessing emergency refills, Oregon Health Authority might be able to help. E-mail the Oregon Health Authority’s Prescription Drug Monitoring Program at: pharmacy@state.or.us

Drinking water may be affected by wildfires

After a wildfire, those who have water supplied by a public water system should know:

  • Customers should stay tuned for messaging from their public water system regarding a potential boil or do not drink advisory. If there is no advisory, it is okay to drink the water.
  • If wildfire was directly over or very near water pipes and water pressure was lost, avoid drinking the water until it is tested for contamination or verified that no plastic pipes were affected.
  • Keep an emergency supply of water in case a power outage causes a disruption in service.

After a wildfire, domestic well users should Assess, Protect, and Test the well with the following guidance:

Begin by completing a well assessment to identify damage level and next steps.

English: https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le3558a.pdf

Spanish: https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/ls3558a.pdf

If you own a well and a wildfire didn’t affect your area, but you had a power outage:

  • Turn on a faucet in the home to see if water comes out.
  • Observe whether water intermittently spurts out because of air escaping from the open faucet. Spurting water indicates a loss of pressure in the well and the household plumbing.

What should be done if the well lost pressure?

  • Warn users not to drink the water until the well water tests negative for bacterial contamination.
  • Test water for bacterial contamination at a minimum. Water may need to be tested for nitrates and other local contaminants of concern using a certified laboratory.
  • Prime the well pump.
  • Disinfect* and flush the well. Consult with a well contractor if needed.

NOTE: Turn off power to the pump before inspecting to avoid electrical shock.

For additional tips visit:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Private Wells after a Wildfire: https://www.cdc.gov/nceh/ehs/water/private-wells/after-a-wildfire.html

Oregon Health Authority’s Domestic Well Water Program: https://www.oregon.gov/oha/PH/HEALTHYENVIRONMENTS/DRINKINGWATER/SOURCEWATER/DOMESTICWELLSAFETY/Pages/Wildfire-Impacted-Domestic-Well-Testing.aspx

Contact Info:
Media contact: Erica Heartquist, 503-871-8843, Erica.J.Heartquist@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley : Open invitation to educate students at our nation’s Capitol, Washington DC

U.S. Capitol
Washington, DC

Sen. Jeff Merkley: Open Invitation for Oregon Students to Apply for 2023 Senate Page Program

Applications for Summer 2023 are due January 15, 2023

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Oregon’s U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley announced he is accepting applications to the U.S. Senate Page Program for summer 2023. From now until January 15, 2023, students in Oregon completing their sophomore or junior year of high school during the 2022-23 school year have the opportunity to apply to be part of the Senate Page Program next summer.   

Only 30 positions are available among 100 senators and the selection process is highly competitive—if selected, the Senate Page Program provides students with first-hand experience of Senate operations. Pages play a critical role in the daily work of the U.S. Senate by helping to deliver correspondence, legislative material, amendments and bills around the congressional complex and during congressional proceedings.

“To the young leaders of Oregon who wish to get informed and get involved in the political process, I encourage you to consider the Senate Page Program,” said Merkley. “Being a Senate page is a unique opportunity to come to our nation’s capital and see the inner workings of Congress firsthand, and a great opportunity to take part in creating the change you wish to see in the world.”   

Since 2017, Merkley has sponsored eight Senate pages. Senate pages are appointed and sponsored by a Senator. Unlike interns who work in the Senators’ offices, pages work for the Senate as a whole and spend much of their days on the Senate floor. Pages will receive a stipend ($), live in a dormitory near the Capitol, and attend classes in addition to performing their page duties.  

To be eligible to serve as a Senate page during the Summer 2023 session, you must be: 

1.A high school junior or senior for the 2023-2024 school year; 

2.Between the ages of sixteen and eighteen years old on the date of appointment (the date the page session starts); 

3.A U.S. citizen; and 

4. Able to maintain a cumulative grade point average of 3.0 or higher. 

Interested participants should apply online and must upload the following items:  

5. An official copy of your high school transcript(s); 

6. A current resume; 

7. A cover letter explaining why you wish to be a Senate page; 

8. A letter of recommendation from one of your teachers; 

9. A letter of recommendation from a supervisor familiar with your work on a job or in volunteer service; 

10. A short essay (250 to 500 words) responding to the question, “Describe one major problem that the United States is currently facing and – if you were a U.S. Senator from Oregon – how you would try to fix that problem.” 

For more information about the page application process and for any questions or for further assistance, please contact Senator Jeff Merkley’s office at 202-224-3753. 

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