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Residents and visitors can all do our share to keep Newport special – Mayor Dean Sawyer

Takes teamwork to make good things happen…Mayor Dean Sawyer

Residents and visitors can all do our share to keep Newport special

Newport is a wonderful small town with a cooler summer climate. Tourists know this and, understandably, flock to Newport. 
We welcome them but realize the stress and increasing costs are placed on our utilities, streets and public safety. Miles traveled on our city streets wear down our infrastructure. Our police and fire department calls and responses to incidents tend to increase significantly during peak tourism seasons. During those times, our city of 10,000 often is host to as many as 30,000 people.
On average, 17,600 people visit the Visual Arts Center. Like the Performing Arts Center, Recreation Center and other facilities visitors and residents alike use, these are amenities that most cities of 10,000 don’t get to enjoy. We’d like to keep them in good shape for continued enjoyment for many years to come. The proposed 5-cent gas tax and 5-percent prepared food tax are ways to make sure city services and facilities are funded equitably.
Both Ashland and Yachats have a prepared food tax which hasn’t decreased their tourism. Visitors who love Newport can contribute to our common good.
Newport residents found solutions to city financial issues
To ensure financial sustainability, the Finance Work Group spent three years balancing revenues and cuts. That group of citizen volunteers looked at and examined closely at many options before arriving at a 5-percent.prepared food tax and 5-cent-per gallon gas tax.
These were difficult conversations, but the bottom line is we have to do something. The city cannot maintain our buildings and infrastructure adequately, or keep our public safety at reasonable levels unless the sizable funding gap is closed.
City Manager Nebel has specified exactly the amounts expected to be raised by each of these taxes, and where it would be spent. The plan is carefully thought out. We even included grants for the businesses that will be collecting the tax to cover the costs of doing that, which makes this proposal even more fair.
No choice is completely painless, but this is the most equitable solution by having a mechanism where visitors and residents alike shoulder the burden for services we all count on. This is a solution that took years of work to reach. It’s in all of our best interest.
Prepared food tax is an equitable solution to financial woes
It costs money to run a city’s government services. A citizen work group examined the city’s expenses and income projections for years to come. They reached a simple conclusion. The cost of operating our city government, with its services and amenities that people count on, is rising faster than new revenue.
Those same volunteers came up with solutions. None of them are easy. And no choice is painless. The slightly increased gas tax plus the prepared food and beverage tax is the most fair combination overall. Cars are getting better mileage and dining out is optional.
The city already has cut 22 positions from its budget and other expenses. Continuing to operate at these levels and only cutting will be a detriment to the quality of life we, as well as our visitors, enjoy. The alternatives are much more daunting. 
Those include letting potholes grow, not paving city streets or sidewalks, letting storm drains fail, not taking care of our city facilities, not re-striping streets, not mowing city parks and the list goes on. The other options include increasing city fees and other measures that impact our most vulnerable populations the most. 
Our city is required to balance the budget while meeting expectations for growth, upkeep and safety. The two city tax measures on the ballot accomplish this in the fairest way possible.
Dean Sawyer
Mayor of Newport

Editorial: Neotsu family gives thumbs down on 21-203 STR’s

A few privileged people who don’t need the income associated with local tourism, are attempting to segregate certain neighborhoods and restrict other less fortunate folks from enjoying their little section of the coast.

Who in the world would think that reducing available lodging for tourists won’t negatively impact the county economy and the majority of it’s residents?  Do they not understand that all the cities within the county are doing whatever they can to promote more tourism?

Wealthy people who have moved into the county, many from out of state, who now don’t like the effects of tourism, maybe should have thought things through a bit more before moving here.  It’s like moving in next to an airport, and then trying to shut it down because it’s to noisy.

They claim they want to take back their neighborhood, however these neighborhoods always had diverse seasonal visitors and vacationers, well before these elitists arrived.

Proponents claim 21-203 is about zoning, or septic systems, or out of state greed, or no enforcement of the rules, or failure of the commissioners to act quickly. But what this measure is really about is creating neighborhoods that only those privileged people can enjoy.  This privilege will come at the expense of those that will lose their jobs if Measure 21-203 passes, and it will come at the expense of the less fortunate, who will no longer be welcome to come vacation in these areas.

Let’s allow the County Commissioners the opportunity to address the legitimate concerns with STR’s, and then let’s move forward in a manner that preserves the coastal neighborhoods for all the people, not just a privileged few.

VOTE NO on 21-203

       Mitchell Gensman
       Homeowner – Neotsu, OR

Countywide Ballot Measures Lincoln County 21-203, Newport Ballot Measures 21-206

Letter to the Editor from Newport Resident Carla Perry

Three ballot measures: Lincoln County 21-203; Newport 21-205 and 21-206.

Countywide Ballot Measure 21-203. VOTE YES.
This ballot measure drops maximum occupancy rates down to a reasonable two people per bedroom, and would allow a five-year phase out of vacation rental licenses in residential areas of unincorporated Lincoln County. The measure does not involve vacation rentals inside city limits, or vacation rentals located in commercial or industrial areas of unincorporated Lincoln County. The homes affected could be sold or used as long-term rentals and still make money for the owners. The ballot measure would also mandate that vacation rentals on septic systems be required to have those systems checked. The measure even provides an exception process. All very reasonable modifications. The money to create the alarming and misleading ads and mailings against Ballot Measure 21-203 is not coming from residents of the County. So read your voters pamphlet (located in your ballot envelope) for the true aspects of this ballot measure. VOTE YES on 21-203.

City of Newport Ballot Measures 21-206 and 21-205. VOTE NO ON BOTH.
These two ballot measures would create a year-round increase in City gasoline taxes to 5 cents a gallon, and a new 5% restaurant tax. Both measures are supposedly targeted at visitors to ease the burden of public safety and infrastructure repairs that now fall entirely on residents, but are caused by hosting 30,000 visitors to Newport every day. But visitors buy gas only once while they’re in town, or eat in our restaurants for a day or two. Residents will paying these taxes year-round. Plus, the restaurant industry shouldn’t be singled out to carry this burden.

A far more equitable way to cover the costs of hosting 30,000 visitors to Newport each day is to enforce Municipal Code. The City’s policy of “voluntary compliance,” and its refusal to pursue fines for documented violations, has left hundreds of thousands of dollars on the table. Most years, the City walks away from more than a million dollars by forgiving fines, settling with violators, or waiving penalties entirely. The City of Newport could obtain all the needed revenue these measures would raise by using room tax dollars, enforcing Municipal Code, issuing citations to violators, and by pursuing past-due taxes, fines, penalties, and interest. They’ll find plenty of money in plain sight.

Carla Perry
Newport

And the beat goes on…

The following views and opinions by Bruce Trent are strictly his own and do not necessarily reflect the views and opinions of NewsLincolnCounty.com or its staff.

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Vote No On Ballot Measure 21-203 – Protect Your Property Rights (Opinion)

While most of the debate around voting no on ballot measure 21-203 has focused on the loss of revenue, jobs, county transient room tax and tourism, what is also at stake is the individual property owner’s rights. A subset of Lincoln County residents wants to take away legal, managed and regulated uses of private property in R-1, R-1A and R-2 zoning areas.  What was legal and allowable uses of our property when we purchased it would be gone if 21-203 were to be passed.

Most of what measure 21-203 seeks has already been addressed by the Lincoln County Commissioners. Strengthening oversight, limits and caps to assure livability, frequent inspections and strict licensing requirements.

What 21-203 proposes that the Lincoln County Commissioners did not undertake is the 5 (five) year phase out of all STR’s. The phase out only impacts unincorporated areas, this is a blatant attempt to target a small subset of the entire Lincoln County community and property owners. Today they target unincorporated Lincoln County, tomorrow maybe you? STR’s for sure play a role in the economy and employment of individuals within Lincoln County, this cannot be denied.

I urge all registered voters to vote NO and send a message, that message is that groups or individuals attempting to take away individual rights will not be tolerated in our county!

Bruce Trent

Miroco (Unincorporated Lincoln County)

Citizen voting No on Ballot Measure 21-203

The views and opinions of the following Letter to the Editor are entirely those of Walt Saling of Tigard, Oregon and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or views of NewsLincolnCounty.com and its staff. 

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Ballot Measure 21-203

I wholeheartedly agree with Lincoln County‘s commissioners opposition to ballot measure 21-203.  Our beautiful historic house on north Devil’s Lake has been my home away from home for over 30 years, where we’ve befriended and employed many wonderful neighbors in our expansive, diverse community.  Some of them lost their homes in the Echo Mountain fire last year.  We welcomed them to stay with us until they found permanent housing.  This is what good neighbors do.

Unfortunately, today a small, select group of privileged individuals are aggressively promoting the passage of this ballot measure. How nice it must be for them to live the high life on their out-of-state wealth, having zero reliance on the income short term rentals and tourism provides.  Income that is vital to the countless hard working residents of Lincoln County!

For decades, city and community leaders strive to promote Lincoln County’s tourism industry because they clearly understand and appreciate the significance of this sustainable, irreplaceable resource.

I encourage all Lincoln County voters to reject ballot measure 21-203, and send a clear message to it’s sponsors their utopian neighborhood ideology is not welcome here!

OTIS TIGER STRONG!!!
Walt Saling
Tigard, Oregon
salingwa@hotmail.com
503-314-3259

Getting down to the wire…

Countries around the world intelligently share their beautiful environment without losing their beautiful environment.  Rather than triggering a war between out-of-town owners of single-family properties vs. long-time-in-town-residents, we should explore how other cities, states and countries have preserved certain areas for long term residents while also intelligently constructing low-to-mid-rise-vacation rentals and condos – which usually have dramatically better views of the town and the ocean.  In short this should not evolve into “Winner Take All” or “Well see you in court” which can take many months or years.

In the meantime there are oodles of millionaires out there that are licking their chops over transforming many communities across America into “single family mini-motels” which suddenly appear, especially in Oregon, without any guidance from the Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission or any other land use options.  There are an abundance of richie riches out there who are now devoted to transforming single-family homes into high profit turnstiles. Money no longer talks.  It’s a blasting bullhorn.

Chamber to Hold Holiday Bazaar on November 20

Newport, OR –  The Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce Ambassadors will hold a Holiday Bazaar on Saturday, November 20 from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. The bazaar will be held at the American Legion, located at 424 W Olive Street in Newport.

Vendors are invited to sign up for a space beginning October 16. The price is $30 for Chamber members and $35 for the general public.  Each space is approximately ten by ten feet with one table and two chairs. Each vendor will also be asked to donate one item to be included by the raffle. Vendor space is limited and is available on a first come, first served basis.

Safety protocols will be prioritized and all vendors will be asked to sanitize their space between shoppers. Everyone present will be required to wear a mask.

The Ambassadors are a group of Chamber members who promote a healthy local economy through business support and community development. Proceeds from the event will benefit their programs and initiatives.

More information and vendor guidelines are available at newportchamber.org or by calling Donna Carter at 541-905-9178.

“ART TOLEDO” ISSUES CALL FOR ARTISTS FOR PHANTOM GALLERIES

The Arts Revitalization of Toledo City of Toledo
206 N. Main St./P.O. Box 220 Toledo, OR 97391

CONTACT: Rachael Maddock-Hughes, Principal, Sequoia Consulting rachael@sequoiaconsulting.org | (503) 810-4985

ART TOLEDO ISSUES CALL FOR ARTISTS FOR PHANTOM GALLERIES

Toledo – ART Toledo invites artists to apply for its third round of Phantom Galleries.

Artists are encouraged to apply at https://tinyurl.com/toledophantom3. The application is open to all artists from around the region. The application will remain open until November 8, 2021. Selected artists will be notified by November 15th. Public view of the third round of Phantom Galleries will begin in mid-November and will last three months.

Toledo is also looking for more volunteers to join the ART Committee! If you are interested in volunteering, please go to https://tinyurl.com/arttoledovolunteer. This is a fun group of citizens that is helping to build Toledo’s future. You will get to help choose the artists for the Phantom Galleries, as well as help select artists and designs for the new Mural Program. Please apply today!

Toledo’s Main Street Phantom Galleries are small, temporary art galleries created in vacant storefronts to allow visitors to enjoy the works of local and regional artists in a COVID-safe environment. The galleries not only enliven Toledo’s Main Street but showcase available street- level storefronts that are ripe for new business development.

“Phantom Galleries are a great intersection between art and business development,” said Paul Schuytema, Executive Director of the Economic Development Alliance of Lincoln County. “Utilizing empty storefronts to showcase and sell an artist’s work helps these regional solopreneurs while showcasing the great potential business spaces helps to launch new ventures downtown, and Toledo is already seeing the benefit.”

Each gallery has information about the artist, their displayed work, and how it can be purchased as well as the commercial space and its amenities. QR codes will allow visitors to scan and then visit the artist’s page on ARTToledo.com or learn more about the potential of the commercial spaces.

Phantom Galleries are a part of the City’s new Art Revitalization of Toledo initiative (ART) which includes the summer Arts, Oysters and Brews event series, grants for downtown beautification and outdoor dining, as well as a soon to be launched mural program.

 

ART is overseen by a dedicated ART Committee of engaged citizens, local businesses, and non- profits. Members include: the Timbers Restaurant and Lounge, Crow’s Nest Gallery, Port of Toledo, the Economic Development Alliance of Lincoln County, Yaquina Pacific Railroad Historical Society, Michael Gibbons Gallery, Yaquina River Museum of Art, Oregon Coast Visitors Association, local artists, Toledo High School, Toledo Chamber of Commerce, local artists, members of the community, and more. The ART Committee selects artists for the Phantom Galleries.

If you would like to learn how to get involved in Toledo ART, please contact Rachael Maddock- Hughes at rachael@sequoiaconsulting.org.

You can follow ART Toledo online at:

  • Web: ARTToledo.com
  • Facebook: facebook.com/ArtToledoOR
  • Instagram: instagram.com/art_toledoor/

Covid-19 Report

Oregon reports 1,218 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 20 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore.There are 20 new COVID-19 related deaths in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 4,161, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,218 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 348,766.

Newest COVID-19 modeling report projects decrease in daily cases and hospitalizations

Today, OHA released its latest COVID-19 forecast showing a continued decline in daily cases and hospitalizations through mid-October.

According to the report, the effective reproduction rate — the expected number of secondary cases that a single case generates — was estimated at 0.91 on Sept. 29, which is lower than last week’s projection.

At that level of transmission, the report estimates 300 cases per 100,000 people, or an average of 895 daily cases for the two-week period between Oct. 20 and Nov. 2. and 54 hospitalizations per day by Nov. 2.

The report also estimated the potential impact from the projected spread of the disease based on the average level of transmission from Sept. 23 through 29, which closely tracks the reported data during that week.

At that rate of transmission, new daily cases and hospitalizations are expected to decline more steeply, with an estimated average of 245 cases per 100,000 people, projecting an average of 740 new cases and 43 hospitalizations through Nov. 2.

The report also indicated that hospitals across the state are seeing declines in COVID-19 hospitalizations and declining COVID-19 intensive care admissions.

Vaccinations remain the most effective shield against COVID-19. Oregonians should wear masks when in indoor public spaces and when outdoors among crowds.

OHA enhances its monoclonal antibody therapy (mAb) webpage

COVID-19 cases can result in serious illness, hospitalizations and deaths. Monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies can help prevent severe illness, save lives and reduce the burden on our hospitals and health systems. 

This therapy is available through shots or IV infusion, making it easier for providers to give and patients to get. The therapies can be used as treatment for confirmed positive patients and as prevention after a COVID-19 exposure.

This page has been further enhanced to update the weekly federal allocation table and provider requests as well as the providers that have been allocated mAb product weekly, since allocation decisions were transferred to the state.

Both will now be updated weekly.

Due to limitations in supply, OHA is working to equitably distribute the federal allocation.

(more…)

And now more than a few noteworthy statements from Sheriff Curtis Landers

Sheriff Curtis Landers
Lincoln County

EARTHQUAKE AND TSUNAMI PREPAREDNESS

October is Tsunami Preparedness Month and the perfect opportunity to talk about earthquake and tsunami readiness.

Prepare for the Next Earthquake or Tsunami
Government agencies and other emergency organizations cannot protect you from the next earthquake or tsunami. Even under the best of circumstances, medical aid or public safety officials may not be able to reach you for hours, days, or even weeks. It is our responsibility as individuals, neighborhoods and communities to reduce risks, to prepare for the critical period immediately after the earthquake, and to make sure that planning for earthquakes and tsunamis has the high priority it deserves. By becoming informed, we can take actions to protect ourselves, reduce losses, and recover quickly.

Earthquake Preparation – Cascadia Subduction Zone or On-Shore Earthquakes

  • Anchor and secure appliances, furniture, glass objects, and art to wall studs and/or other furniture items.
  • Know how to turn off water, gas and electricity and have the non-sparking tools to do so.
  • Keep a bag next to your bed with shoes, extra glasses, gloves, poncho, flashlight or headlamp so you are ready to evacuate once the shaking stops.
  • Have a 3-5 day kit in your car in case you need to use it as a place of shelter until the aftershocks subside.
  • Participate and register for https://www.shakeout.org/oregon/ on October 21, 2021 at 10:21am – the world’s largest earthquake drill. Review these resources for businesses, organizations, and community members.

Earthquake Response – If you feel an earthquake

  • Drop, cover, and hold on until after the shaking stops, then evacuate outside to survey damages to the building.
  • If indoors, get under a sturdy table, hold on and be prepared to move with the table.
  • If in bed, stay in the bed and protect your head with a pillow.
  • If outdoors, find a clear spot away from buildings and trees and stay until the shaking stops.
  • If in a vehicle, pull over to a clear location until shaking stops.
  • Be ready for aftershocks that could last for days after the main shock.

Tsunami Preparedness and Response

A tsunami is a series of sea waves, usually caused by a displacement of ocean floor by an undersea earthquake. As tsunamis enter shallow water near land, they increase in height and can cause great loss of life and property damage. 

  • When at the coast, know the distant and local tsunami evacuation routes. Look for educational signs at beach entry areas and tsunami assembly area points.
  • A Distant Tsunami will take 4 or more hours to come on shore and you will feel no earthquake. The tsunami will generally be smaller than that from a local earthquake. Typically, there is time for an official warning from our Lincoln County Lincoln Alerts and the National Warning Center to evacuate to safety.
  • A Local Tsunami can come on shore within 15-20 minutes after the earthquake and before there is time for an official warning from the national warning system. Ground shaking may be the only warning you have, so evacuate quickly to high ground out of the local tsunami zone.
  • Do not return until emergency officials have advised that it is safe to return.

Resources
 

Great Oregon ShakeOut:

Lincoln County Emergency Management 

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Preparing for an earthquake

Red Cross

For more information and tips, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

Getting down to the wire with 15neighborhoods

From 15neighborhoods:
Dear 15neighborhoods Listserv member:
 
Thank you for making a difference in your community!  
 
Because of your support,15neighborhoods successfully qualified Ballot Measure 21-203 for this November’s special election. As a result, we are on our way to restoring the balance between tourism and our community that makes Lincoln County such a special place. But qualifying for the ballot was only half of the battle. 
 
We need your help to win! Unfortunately, outside real estate investors are pouring money into our county, spreading false claims about what this ballot measure actually does. If we are going to win, we all need to do our part.  
 
The best ways for you to support this Campaign are:
 
1. Donate! Your generous donation will get our message out to the voters who need to hear it through radio, digital and print ads, social media, and our postcard campaign. Both billboards are now up, our digital ads are running on NewsLincolnCounty and YachatsNews (bilingual), our social media presence has been updated, and interviews on radio (KYAQ 91.7 FM and KNPT 1310 AM) and TV (KPTW) are scheduled. Our plans for the Newport News-Times ads will showcase why “Restoring Housing and Preserving Neighborhoods” in the single-family residential zones (R1, R1A, and R2) is so critical to the sustainability of Lincoln County and a goal valued by supporters like you. To guide us through the last six weeks of the Campaign, we hired a Campaign consultant and a Social Media consultant. Once they learned about our Mission, they agreed to accept a fraction of the going rate for this expertise. 
2. Volunteer! Whether it’s stuffing envelopes, postcard writing, phone banking, writing Letters to the Editor, liking and sharing our posts on Facebook, or waving signs, there are lots of ways to volunteer. You can sign up at 15neighborhoods.com, call 541-764-2658, or reply to 15neighborhoods@gmail.com. Just as important is to to talk with five of your friends and ask each of them to tell five of their friends, etc. Forward this email as a reminder. 
Our grassroots, community-based Campaign can only succeed if we all chip in and do our part. But with your help, we can win this election, restore our neighborhoods, and send a message up and down this beautiful Oregon Coast – Our Communities are Not For Sale!
 
Respectfully,
Monica Kirk, Steering Committee
541-764-2658
 
Follow us on Facebook at www.facebook/15neighborhoods.com, like and share to stay updated.
 
P.S. If you have have a “Neighborhoods, not Vacation Rentals” sign from the signature-gathering Campaign, you’ll want it updated with a free bumper sticker (below). Want a bumper sticker for your sign, a bumper, or somewhere else? Please reply with your address and phone number. A volunteer will deliver.


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Traffic Crash on Highway 101 at Otter Crest Loop at Milepost 131

3:25pm  Report of a traffic crash on Highway 101 near Otter Crest Loop.  The crash is estimated to be at Milepost 131.  Watch for emergency responders.

3:27pm  Report from the scene indicates an elderly man has been injured.  Caution in the area.

3:32pm  Crash determined to be a rear-ender.

Vote No On Ballot Measure 21-203 – Protect Your Property Rights (Opinion)

The following editorial on Ballot Measure 21-203 reflects strictly the views and opinions of the author, Bruce Trent.  Others have differing viewpoints of NewsLincolnCounty.com and its staff.  Mr. Trent will Vote No On Ballot Measure 21-203 – Protect Your Property Rights (Opinion)

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By Bruce Trent – submitter:  While most of the debate around voting no on ballot measure 21-203 has focused on the loss of revenue, jobs, county transient room tax and tourism, what is also at stake is the individual property owner’s rights. A subset of Lincoln County residents wants to take away legal, managed and regulated uses of private property in R-1, R-1A and R-2 zoning areas.  What was legal and allowable uses of our property when we purchased it would be gone if 21-203 were to be passed.

Most of what measure 21-203 seeks has already been addressed by the Lincoln County Commissioners. Strengthening oversight, limits and caps to assure livability, frequent inspections and strict licensing requirements.

What 21-203 is proposing is that Lincoln County Commissioners did not undertake their 5 (five) year phase out of all STR’s. The phase out only impacts unincorporated areas. This is a blatant attempt to target a small subset of the entire Lincoln County community and property owners. Today they target unincorporated Lincoln County, tomorrow maybe you? STR’s for sure play a role in the economy and employment of individuals within Lincoln County, this cannot be denied.

I urge all registered voters to vote NO – a message is that groups or individuals attempting to take away individual rights will not be tolerated in our county!

Bruce Trent

Miroco (Unincorporated Lincoln County

Local residents who live outside city limits in Lincoln County – HEADS UP!!

The views and/or opinions expressed with regard to the upcoming election on the 15Neighborhoods.com ballot issue are 15Neighborhoods.com’s own and do not necessarily reflect the views or opinions of NewsLincolnCounty.com, or its staff.
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FROM 15 NEIGHBORHOODS:
1. URGENT NEED FOR PHONE BANKERS and LETTER-WRITERS
Voters must hear from supporters of YES on 21-203. You are honest, hard-working, residents who CARE about the present and the future. We want a livable Lincoln County with sustainable tourism, affordable long-term housing for everyone, and safe, healthy neighborhoods.  Measure 21-203 affects the existing 525 licensed STRs in neighborhoods outside of the cities ONLY. 
Yes, it is a County-wide vote. No, it does not affect STRs in within city limits.
YES on 21-203 supporters are honest. We do not lie. We do not cheat. We do not deliberately try to confuse and bewilder voters. We do not live our lives that way and we will not conduct an election campaign that way. 
However, priding ourselves in not being corrupt will not win this election. We must show that we care by reaching out to neighbors by phone and by letters.  
Phone bank training will resume this weekend. By now, everyone has talked with their friends and neighbors at least once. Now, write a letter to your doctors, dentist, vet, dog groomers, the builders supply and hardware companies, the employees of the grocery and health food stores, tourist attractions like the Aquarium, the Hatfield Marine Science Center, the Visual Arts Center? Send or drop of your letter to the Newport Recreation Center, the 60+ Center, Les Schwab, the libraries, the Community Centers, and  the Community Colleges. Ask that the letter be posted in the Break Room.  Don’t forget to givee a letter to your  plumber, electrician, HVAC, pest control, landscaping service, your kid’s teacher, or the gas station attendant. This allows business to support us without posting signs.
Friday’s Newport News-Times will include an 8.5 by 11 inch color Insert. The Insert includes answers to the most commonly asked questions. Give your Insert to someone else, rather than throw it away. Below are the FAQs on the Insert. Perhaps include them with your letter.
<HOW TO PHONE BANK FOR l5neighborhoods.docx>
<HOW TO WRITE LETTERS FOR 15neighborhoods.docx>
<INSERT FAQs .docx>
2. THE OPPOSITION IS ENCOURAGING STR OWNERS TO FALSELY CLAIM TO BE RESIDENTS TO VOTE IN OUR ELECTIONS. 
Thanks to Bayshore Accountability Neighbors Group (B.A.N.G.), documentary evidence of an STR owner registered in Lane County who switched his registration to Lincoln County for this election was discovered. Lincoln County Elections Clerk Dana Jenkins is looking into this and asked me to let people know the following: 

On Oct 13, 2021, at 3:45 PM, Dana Jenkins <djenkins@co.lincoln.or.us> wrote:

And can you let people know I am taking the following steps?
We have heard concerns that non-residents are being encouraged to temporarily register to vote in Lincoln County in order to affect the outcome of Measure 21-203.
To make sure this doesn’t happen, we are taking the following steps:
1. Identify registrants who are new or have updated in the last 6 weeks that have mailing addresses outside Lincoln County.
2. Flag their ballots so that when the voted ballot is received it will go into a “need more information” status and not be counted until investigated.
3. Send an inquiry to the above registrants asking them to provide proof of their residency in Lincoln County as per ORS 247.035
Also discovered yesterday on the Devils Lake Neighborhoods Association (DLNA) website was a screen shot encouraging people to switch their voter registration to Lincoln County for the election and back again. Members of DLNA are also members of Via Oregon. Yesterday afternoon is was removed.
<DLNA Post Oct 13, 2021 >
Respectfully,
Monica 
Monica Kirk, Steering Committee

www.15neighborhoods.com

fb 15neighborhoods
P.O. Box 390
Depoe Bay 97341
541-764-2658
 

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Merkley, Padilla, Feinstein Push to Keep Major Investments in Affordable Housing in Build Back Better Package

U.S. Capitol
Washington, DC

WASHINGTON, D.C. – As Oregon, California, and many other states across the U.S. confront an unprecedented housing affordability crisis, Oregon’s U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley and U.S. Senators Alex Padilla (D-CA) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) are leading a major push to ensure that comprehensive housing investments stay in President Biden’s Build Back Better plan.

The three senators were joined in their push by more than two dozen Senate colleagues: U.S. Senators Sherrod Brown (D-OH), Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Michael Bennet (D-CO), Tammy Duckworth (D-IL), Chris Coons (D-DE), Dick Durbin (D-IL), Tim Kaine (D-VA), Martin Heinrich (D-NM), Ron Wyden (D-OR), Mazie Hirono (D-HI), Jack Reed (D-RI), Gary Peters (D-MI), Cory Booker (D-NJ), Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), Jeanne Shaheen (D-NH), Tina Smith (D-MN), Rev. Raphael Warnock (D-GA), Chris Van Hollen (D-MD), Edward J. Markey (D-MA), Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Brian Schatz (D-HI), Tammy Baldwin (D-WI), Ben Ray Lujan (D-NM), Maggie Hassan (D-NH), Mark Warner (D-VA), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), Ben Cardin (D-MD), Catherine Cortez-Masto (D-NV), Angus King (I-ME), Chris Murphy (D-CT), Jon Ossoff (D-GA), and Jacky Rosen (D-NV).

“The Build Back Better plan is a rare opportunity to deliver critical investments that we have failed to make for far too long,” the senators wrote in a letter to President Joe Biden, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer.“Housing challenges are different in every community, and we need different tools to address the growing problems they face. But with comprehensive investments, we can create, preserve, and improve millions of homes so that we bring down the cost of housing and improve its condition. And an investment in safe, affordable housing is central to the success of proposed investments in education, health, and our local economies. At the same time, investments in sustainable, energy-efficient housing can lower families’ bills, make our homes and communities more resilient to climate-driven disasters, and reduce our impact on the planet—all while creating good paying jobs.”

The senators noted that housing is the most expensive item in most families’ budget, and that more than 10 million families spend more than half their income on housing each month. As the Build Back Better plan moves through Congress in the coming weeks, this moment represents a unique opportunity to reverse these trends and improve the day-to-day economic realities for millions of families across America.

Dear Mr. President, Speaker Pelosi, and Majority Leader Schumer:

We write to express the urgent need to invest in housing within legislation to enact President Biden’s Build Back Better plan.

Housing is the most expensive part of most families’ budget. Nearly a quarter of renters – 10.5 million families – spend more than half their income on housing each month, and too many families who want to own their own home are locked out of the market. Nearly 19 million people live in a food desert, and 35 million homes have at least one health or safety hazard, including more than 4 million homes with young children that have lead paint hazards. Others require renovation to help an elderly family member or a person with a disability to remain in their home. And still more families do not have adequate housing at all. Even before the COVID-19 pandemic began, more than 580,000 people, including children and seniors, had no safe place to stay on any given night, and more than 3.7 million evictions were filed during the course of a year.

The Build Back Better plan is a rare opportunity to deliver critical investments that we have failed to make for far too long. Housing challenges are different in every community, and we need different tools to address the growing problems they face. But with comprehensive investments, we can create, preserve, and improve millions of homes so that we bring down the cost of housing and improve its condition. And an investment in safe, affordable housing is central to the success of proposed investments in education, health, and our local economies. At the same time, investments in sustainable, energy-efficient housing can lower families’ bills, make our homes and communities more resilient to climate-driven disasters, and reduce our impact on the planet – all while creating good paying jobs. 

Last month, the House Financial Services Committee advanced legislation to provide investments to expand affordable rental housing, help families access homeownership, remove lead paint and other health hazards from homes, repair public and assisted rural housing, address climate change, and invest in neighborhoods. Build Back Better legislation must include these kinds of comprehensive investments in rental housing, affordable homeownership, and community needs in urban, rural, and Tribal areas.

To invest in American families, we must invest in the homes and the communities where those families live. As we work to create a Build Back Better package, we must make investments in housing opportunity a central pillar of the plan because, as Evicted author Matthew Desmond wrote last week, “the success of all other opportunity-expanding initiatives depends on it.”

The COVID-19 crisis revealed the depth of our country’s affordable housing crisis at the same time that it revealed how important our homes are to our health, our well-being, and our lives. We must take this opportunity to build back better by addressing housing needs in communities across the nation.

Lincoln City Police Assists SAMARITAN NLH to conduct armed intruder training drill at the hospital…

…only a drill at NLH

Lincoln City Police assisted Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital as they conducted an armed intruder training drill which was held on Tuesday, Oct. 12, at Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital medical campus. The realistic drill was a valuable learning experience for involved staff, who were coached by observers on the appropriate responses to take. Although hospital and clinic staff were notified in advance of the drill, they did not know the frightening details, which are described below courtesy of Mary Jo Kerlin, SHS Communications Strategist.

In the scenario, an angry man entered Samaritan Lincoln City Medical Center at about 11 a.m. demanding to see a doctor who no longer works there. He stormed through the back offices of the clinic waving a (fake) gun, screaming the doctor’s name. As he exited the clinic, he said he was going to the hospital to shoot the first doctor he finds. When he arrived at the hospital, an alert had already been sounded and all staff and visitors were well hidden from sight. He pounded on the glass at the emergency registration desk, paced up and down the public hallways waving his (fake) gun for a couple minutes, and then yelled that he would shoot the first doctor he found in the parking lot. The angry man exited the hospital and began pacing out front while screaming obscenities and waving his (fake) gun. Meanwhile, Lincoln City Police Officers had been dispatched after clinic staff called 9-1-1 and set off the panic alert. Following their approved police protocols, they confronted the arm man outside the building, ordering him to put down his weapon. The man did not comply and aimed his (fake) gun at the officers, who then eliminated the threat with their weapons that, for this scenario, were also fake.

Even though this was just a drill and the guns were fake, the angry man, portrayed by SNLH Medical/Surgical Nurse Bryan Sadler, was extremely convincing. In fact, after the drill he returned to the clinic to formally introduce himself and apologize for frightening them.

LCPD Sgt. Torin Liden and LCPD Officer KC Claunts portrayed the responding officers while other LCPD personnel observed the drill and acted as safety officers. The drill was organized by Mike Bowman, hospital emergency preparedness coordinator, and had LCPD personnel assisting in partnership to help make the drill as realistic as possible while keeping everyone’s safety the number one priority. Lesson learned from the successful drill will help to refine future protocols.

Submitted by:  Lieutenant Jeffrey Winn, LCPD

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