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Using the library from home…

 

Newport Library
A library has never been soooooo quiet!

The Newport 60+ is partnering with the Newport Public Library to offer an informative Zoom session Titled “Library Leads: Using the Library from Home”. This session will cover how to use the online resources offered by your local public library. It will be a ZOOM session on October 14th, Wednesday at 10:30am.

“How to get a library card and use the online catalog”.
“How to access eBooks and eAudiobooks with Library2go”.
“How to access streaming videos, music, and more with hoopla”.

The ZOOM session Summary: Access the library from home! Newport Public Library’s building is closed to the public but we still offer several ways to enjoy our physical and online resources with your library card. Would you like to use the library from home but are unsure of how to log in to the online catalog? We also have streaming eBooks, eAudiobooks, video, music, and more! Learn how to find and enjoy popular titles and old favorites from home using Library2go and hoopla from the Newport Public Library. All you need is a computer and a library card!

You can register for this session on line at www.newportoregon.gov/sc  and click on the yellow banner and the 60+ Activities Tab to register for this session. A zoom link will be provided to those registered prior to the presentation.

If you have any questions about ZOOM or how to sign up please call the Newport 60+ Activity Center at 541 574 5459.

Update on Lincoln County Recovery…

FEMA Remains in Lincoln County through Friday.
➡️Do you know if you qualify to file a claim with FEMA
➡️Do you need to file a claim with FEMA?
➡️Do you need to follow-up with FEMA?
➡️Do you still have questions?
FEMA Representatives in Lincoln County
Mon. Sept. 28 – Fri. Oct. 2nd, 8am-6pm
Lincoln City Community Center 2150 NE Oar Place, Lincoln City
▶️477 claims have already been filed in Lincoln County
▶️205 inspections have been requested by affected community members
▶️188 inspections have already been completed
FEMA Fact Sheet – Why FEMA May Have Found Your Claim Ineligible
https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/sites/default/files/fileattachments/emergency_management/page/5982/fs-dr-4562-or-04_reasons_fema_may_have_found_you_ineligible.pdf

Proposed housing development gets a “cool shoulder” from the LC City Council and Lincoln County gets a big green light from Governor Brown!!

Logan Road
Lincoln City

The Lincoln City City Council Monday evening went round and round with a developer who wants to build an 80 unit housing development on Logan Road.  The developer said he wants to build the complex on just over 11 acres of empty land off Logan Road near the south end.  The units would be built with about ten lower priced units included to help with lower cost housing in the area.

The developer said it would be a very attractive development which would eventually become a higher echelon place for folks to own or perhaps to rent.

After the describing the basic layout the city council immediately raised the issue about traffic congestion at the south end of Logan Road. They pointed out how horrendous during the early hours of the Echo Mountain Fire that the blaze was heading straight for the north Lincoln City area. And it was moving fast forcing Logan Road residents to get in their cars and get out of there. But they got all backed up along a very crowded Logan Road and nothing was moving…for three hours because no one could get on Highway 101 and head south to safety.

Back to the housing development issue… Many Logan Road citizens wrote a stack of letters to the city council demanding that the 80 unit housing development not be built because it would only add to the already serious traffic congestion at the south end of Logan Road as it nears its intersection with Highway 101.  No escape.

The developer and his engineer tried to describe their housing project as “workable” but the council remained skeptical due to the overwhelming list of reasons why the housing project should not be built – at least not there.

The city council agreed that there needs to be more insight into whether such a large development should be allowed to be built in an already “boxed in” area that’s hard to escape from – whether fleeing from a tsunami or a wildfire. The issue returns again in October for more deliberations. But the owner of the 11 acre parcel seemed to see the writing on the wall and sounded like he might be having second thoughts about it. We’ll see how it turns out during a scheduled city council meeting on October 26th.

Covid-19 Virus Update

The council then learned that Lincoln County has earned its Phase II stripes with Governor Brown who approved the county entering Phase II status in terms of the local economy. Phase II conditions take effect Tuesday, September 29th, to allow more stores to open, including bars, gyms, restaurants and entertainment venues all, of course, still requiring masks and social distancing. But IT IS PROGRESS! The Lincoln County Covid-19 infection rate has been falling despite rising infections in many parts of the country. So, to be sure, nothing is for sure.

The fall season forecast is predicting a resurgence of the Covid-19. On top of that, the regular flu virus will eventually be coming along for the ride. Get your flu shot early. We’re all going to need it. A vaccine for Covid-19 will likely be available mid-winter but strictly for use in hospital environments among nurses and doctors and other medical technicians. Vaccines for the rest of us may not be ready for distribution until late Spring/early Summer.  So we’ve still got a long way to go.

Remember to wash your hands every chance you get, always wear your face mask and when you’re out and about keep a distance of AT LEAST six feet between you and anyone else.

County Commissioners definitely in the clean-up, temp-housing and rebuild phase…

Lincoln County Commissioners have launched a recovery program for many residents burned out of their homes due to the Echo Mountain wildfire.  Following a devastating conflagration as houses burned to the ground, the wildfire disrupted everything from waterlines to septic and regular sewer service systems.  Complete recovery will probably be going on for the next three to four years throughout the region.

Commissioners noted that not only will local workers will be part of the team but insurance companies and a number of reconstruction contractors and new home builders will be spread over the entire burn area – and it’s a big one.  The county has a large list of services that are emerging – some private sector, some local public services and non-profit groups that are eager to help families rebuild.  Financial help is expected from federal, state and even local governments.  It’s going to be a complicated experience to navigate but there is a huge array of assistance that touches all aspects of the “rebuilding process.” The county’s website is chock full of options and information for those who need assistance with any and all challenges that face families who want to rebuild.  Here’s a good place to start.  Just CLICK HERE.

The county commissioners are happy to report that Lincoln County government’s efforts to ramp up Covid-19 testing has been paying off.  Infection rates are moderating and in some ways declining.  Keep your fingers crossed, wear your face masks and wash your hands early and often.  Lincoln County residents have been doing just that and because of their disciplined behavior Governor Kate Brown has given Lincoln County the green light to raise the county to Phase II of the pandemic.  It means Lincoln County’s economy is going to ramp up noticeably – stores, gyms, restaurants, shopping outlets and others will once again be open for business.  But facemasks and proper distancing will be strictly enforced.  If we all don’t cooperate, Lincoln County’s Phase II recovery rating may go back down again.  All for one and one for all.  We’ve got to live by it.

County Commissioners and a myriad of other city, county and state officials will be watching everything very carefully because although an anti-Covid-19 vaccine may be available around Christmas or just beyond, there will only be enough vaccine for medical staff so they can continue to save lives.  Vaccine for the rest of us may not be available until late Spring or early Summer.  So be vigilant in the way you travel, shop and work.  Wear your mask, wash your hands often and maintain AT LEAST a six foot distance between you and your fellow humans.  All three precautions can and do save lives. 

Sitka Center Artist-in-Residence Show and Tell

Sitka Center Artist-in-Residence Show and Tell

OTIS, OR – For the next few months, a talented group of artists and scientists will be residing among the trees and wildlife to deeply explore their work as Artists and Scientists-in-Residence at the Sitka Center for Art and Ecology. Join us for the Resident Show & Tell – 4pm on Thursday, October 8 2020 as our Fall residents share what they will be working on!

Tucked in the forest near Cascade Head, the Sitka Center is an ideal location for artists and scientists to withdraw from the distraction of daily life, find the solitude needed to push through their creative boundaries and chase their artistic pursuits and immerse themselves in natural study and reflection. Sitka Center is proud to host residents in varied stages of their journeys, from Oregon and abroad.

The Resident Show & Tell is an opportunity for the community to learn about the work done by these accomplished artists and scientists. This event is free and open to the public via zoom! Join the Sitka community virtually as we enjoy brief presentations of Residents’ work as they begin their residencies. The October 8nd Resident Show & Tell features:

  • AthenaCopenhaverisawriter,editor,sciencecommunicator,andcertifiedclimateinterpreter. Athena’s novel manuscript Deep Shade won the Siskiyou Prize for New Environmental Literature from Ashland Creek Press. Artist and researcher
  • NinaEldercreatesprojectsthatrevealhumanity’sdependenceonandinterruptionofthenatural world.
  • PhilHouseisarapartistbythenameofHailingProudlyfromthesouthsideofChicago.Philhopesto write songs that inspire people to see the best of themselves, their neighbor and the entire world around them.
  • KirstinValdezQuadeistheauthorofNightattheFiestas,whichwontheJohnLeonardPrizefromthe National Book Critics Circle, the Sue Kaufman Prize for First Fiction from the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and a “5 Under 35” award from the National Book Foundation.
  • SamanthaWall,originallyfromSeoul,SouthKorea,isanartistworkinginPortland,Oregon.Wall immigrated to the United States as a child and comes from a multiracial background. Operating from within this framework, her drawings embody the experience of navigating transcultural identity. Samantha is the first of three residents participating in our Jordan Schnitzer Printmaking Residency for 2020/2021.

Letter to the Editor – Endorsement of Judge Amanda Benjamin

Retired professional female loves seeing the fruits of her labor! 

As woman now in her 80s, I look at the present and smile. I entered the workforce in the 1950s. Those were much different times to be a woman trying to succeed. I would eventually become the first female executive for Boise Cascade. I remember all the horrible things I had to put up with, the inappropriate comments, consistent roadblocks and obstacles. At times, I just wanted to quit, but I’d look around the boardroom and I was the ONLY woman there. I knew someday it would change and other women would come after me. Well, things have changed. A bit. 

Now, in retirement, I am delighted to see women like Judge Amanda Benjamin in places of power and influence. I’ve read up on her and I like what I’ve read. Plus, she’s already proving she was the right choice. She is actually doing the job we hired her to do, and she’s doing it well. 

Also, Judge Benjamin was hired by our local judges, lawyers and managers. Judge Benjamin beat out several applicants. Judge Benjamin WAS NOT appointed by Governor Brown. I don’t like Governor Brown making decisions that affect Lincoln County. It’s up to us to decide who we want as our judge. 

We now have the choice to stick with the candidate that we selected, or vote for the one Governor Brown selected.  

I am voting for Judge Benjamin. She is the one we hired; now let’s make it official and elect her to the position. 

Shelly Thornicroft
1609 NE 14th Street
Lincoln City, Oregon 97367
Thornicroftshelly@gmail.com

Without reliable, worthy communications, we’re all on the dark side of the Moon…

As we continue to pull ourselves out from under our horrific battle with the Echo Mountain Fire, as well as fires all around Oregon, it’s time to admit local governments failed to adequately communicate with residents…”adequate” as in TIMELY and reliable contact with the public.

When electricity, cell phone towers and the internet are down, most residents may as well be on the dark side of the Moon. For everyone to maintain contact with emergency services and announcements, we have to “Go Back to the Future”…A-M Radio…so that those with battery powered radios, in homes and in cars, can get the latest up-to-the-minute emergency information to EVERYONE…ALL AT THE SAME TIME! No more “second and third hand information,” no rumors dressed up like “the truth.”

Years ago, before the internet and cell phones, American families relied on what was called The Emergency Broadcast System (EBS). Local (AM) radio stations would switch their programming to relay to the public, whatever threat there was to the community – be it a flood, tornadoes, forest fires, earthquake, tsunami or some other natural or man-caused disaster. The radio announcer would transform the radio station’s role from entertainment to life saving information. They all had a plan and they carried it out – ensuring that those who had battery powered portable radios (and just about everybody had them) vital information about the disaster would reach the ears of every family, individual and business with VALID, REAL INFORMATION instead of rumors. And information updates were instant! INSTANT!! Over the airwaves – not through through 3rd, 4th or 5th party rumor mills. Emergency workers in the field would use their hand-held TWO-WAY RADIOS, or TWO-WAY RADIOS inside their police cars, fire trucks or other vehicles to contact the radio station and tell them what’s going on. Radio station volunteers also equipped with hand-held TWO WAY RADIOS, would write down the information and run it down the hall to the broadcast studio where the information would be immediately broadcast to THE WHOLE COMMUNITY ALL AT THE SAME TIME!!

Now – here’s the clincher! If there’s no power, phone or internet service, how does the radio station get its electricity so it can broadcast life saving information to those with battery powered radios? Easy! PORTABLE-DIESEL-(OR GAS)-ELECTRICAL GENERATORS with a lot of fuel in large underground tanks right outside the radio station building. That fuel is just waiting to be used to generate electricity for the radio station. In “the olde days,” after World War II, AM radio stations used to run weekly tests of “The Emergency Broadcast System.” All it was was a fuel tank in the ground hooked to a generator that burned the fuel that made the power that made the radio station be heard over a huge area. And the information was official, verified and life-saving. Totally rumor free.

Again, it’s a “Back-to-the-Future” kind of technology, but it’s been proven to work time and time again – simply and efficiently. We haven’t heard about this old-“new” way of looking at information distribution because we’ve increasingly relied on cellphone towers, power lines and the internet all of which are the first communication systems to fail.

Disaster + AM radio station + generator + citizens with battery powered radios = informed communities. And you don’t have to buy anything. Everything is in place. Even if the radio station broadcast towers collapse we can whip out a big roll of broadcast wire, fed by a radio transmitter impedance matching-box and tie it to a tall tree and THAT will broadcast the signal. The radio signal many not be as strong, but it’ll be strong enough.

Disasters create isolated, scared-to-death people. AM radio emergency broadcasts lowers everybody’s blood pressure.

FEMA – Stay on ’em….

Keep in Touch—Update Information with FEMA to Avoid Delays

SALEM, Ore.Oregon homeowners and renters who registered for FEMA disaster assistance for help after wildfires should stay in touch with FEMA to ensure the disaster assistance process stays on track.

Survivors should update contact information as soon as possible because FEMA may need to reach them to perform virtual home inspections or get additional information.

FEMA encourages survivors to request direct deposits of disaster assistance to their checking or savings accounts. Survivors should let FEMA know as soon as possible of any changes to their banking information.

It’s important to note that FEMA disaster assistance checks cannot be forwarded. If you cannot access your home address, you can request the postal service to hold your mail.

Survivors who registered with FEMA may update contact information the following ways:

  • Going online at DisasterAssistance.gov
  • Downloading the FEMA app
  • Calling 800-621-3362. Multilingual operators are available 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a week.
  • Disaster survivors who are deaf, have a speech or hearing disability and use TTY may call 800-462-7585.
  • Disaster survivors who use 711 or VRS (Video Relay Service) may call 800-621-3362.

Those who use a Relay service, such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, should provide their specific number assigned to that service.  It is important that FEMA is able to contact you.  Phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number.

 

‘Federal police should not be dressed or behave like an invading army’ – Senator Wyden

Senator’s Wyden and Merkley decry military behavior by federal police

Senators Merkley, Wyden and Colleagues Introduce a Bill to Prohibit Federal Law Enforcement Officers From Wearing Camouflage Combat Fatigues in the U.S.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon’s U.S. Senators Jeff Merkley and Ron Wyden, along with 32 of their Senate Democratic colleagues, today introduced legislation to prohibit federal law enforcement officers from wearing camouflage battle fatigues in the United States in most cases, since they can easily be confused for military personnel or even extremist para-military groups.

General Mark A. Milley stated at a House Armed Services Committee hearing in July: “You want a clear definition between military forces and local police.”

“Dressing and equipping police like warriors sends a message to those officers and to the public that they are at war with the public they are sworn to protect and defend,” said Merkley. “The Trump administration’s excessive violence and secret police tactics against peaceful protesters crying out for justice should shake every American to their core. To change the culture of law enforcement, to protect Black lives, to stand up for civil liberties, we must demilitarize law enforcement.”

“Americans around the country have rightly been peacefully protesting the police violence against Black Americans, only to be met with military force from federal law enforcement deployed to American cities by Donald Trump,” Wyden said. “American cities aren’t battlefields and law enforcement must act and be equipped accordingly. Yet, Donald Trump is fanning the flames of division, fear and violence with the militarization of federal officers. These authoritarian tactics must be stopped.”

The Clear Visual Distinction Between Military and Law Enforcement Act would also recognize that there are rare circumstances when a rare exception is needed for federal law enforcement officers to engage in a discreet tactical operation requiring a camouflage pattern. The legislation would also demand rigorous oversight of any time the previously mentioned exception is invoked by requiring a biannual report to Congress that details the date, operation and justification for each invocation.

This summer, camouflaged federal operatives were sent to Portland by the Trump administration—a move that quickly escalated tensions and injured demonstrators. The unmarked, camouflaged uniforms also closely matched the attire worn by some far-right militias, at a time when extremist militias have been showing up at racial justice protests across the country. Merkley and Wyden vocally opposed the presence and forceful tactics of the federal agents, demanded that they leave, called for a formal investigation into their deployment and violent actions, and introduced legislation to block paramilitary operations in Portland and other American cities.

Could things be calming down? Maybe just a lull in the storm…

Governor Kate Brown Stands Down Law Enforcement Joint Incident Command Structure for Portland

(Salem, OR) — Effective at 6:00 a.m., Governor Kate Brown rescinded her order creating a joint incident command structure for law enforcement in Portland, following the conclusion of planned demonstrations by white supremacist groups. The Governor ended the order after the successful coordination of city, county, and state law enforcement to keep simultaneous demonstrations separated, preventing violence and keeping Oregonians safe while protecting free speech.

“I would like to thank the law enforcement officers of the Oregon State Police, the Multnomah County Sheriff’s Office, the Portland Police Bureau, and other local law enforcement agencies for their professionalism as they executed this plan to prevent confrontations and violence,” said Governor Brown. “I would also like to thank Oregonians for not rising to the bait when the Proud Boys came from out of town to express their hateful views yesterday. When we all work together as a community to keep the peace, we can keep Oregonians safe while still allowing free expression under the First Amendment.”

The Governor’s executive order rescinding the law enforcement joint incident command structure is available here.

Oregon: 242 new cases of Covid-19 and 1 additional death

Covid-19 Virus Update

COVID-19 has claimed one more life in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 547, the Oregon Health Authority reported Sunday. Oregon Health Authority also reported 242 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of Sunday, bringing the state total to 32,820.

The new cases reported today are in the following counties: Benton (1), Clackamas (10), Clatsop (8), Columbia (6), Coos (1), Deschutes (15), Douglas (5), Grant (1), Jackson (9), Jefferson (5), Lake (1), Lane (24), Lincoln (1), Linn (3), Malheur (10), Marion (26), Morrow (1), Multnomah (72), Polk (1), Tillamook (1), Umatilla (14), Wallowa (1), Wasco (3), Washington (23).

Oregon’s 547th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Sept. 23 and died on Sept. 26, at Providence Portland Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Information from FEMA

Keep in Touch—Update Information with FEMA to Avoid Delays

SALEM, Ore. – Oregon homeowners and renters who registered for FEMA disaster assistance for help after wildfires should stay in touch with FEMA to ensure the disaster assistance process stays on track.
Survivors should update contact information as soon as possible because FEMA may need to reach them to perform virtual home inspections or get additional information.
FEMA encourages survivors to request direct deposits of disaster assistance to their checking or savings accounts. Survivors should let FEMA know as soon as possible of any changes to their banking information.
It’s important to note that FEMA disaster assistance checks cannot be forwarded. If you cannot access your home address, you can request the postal service to hold your mail.

Survivors who registered with FEMA may update contact information the following ways:
• Going online at DisasterAssistance.gov
• Downloading the FEMA app
• Calling 800-621-3362. Multilingual operators are available 7 a.m. to 10 p.m., seven days a
week.
• Disaster survivors who are deaf, have a speech or hearing disability and use TTY may call
800-462-7585.
• Disaster survivors who use 711 or VRS (Video Relay Service) may call 800-621-3362.
Those who use a Relay service, such as a videophone, Innocaption or CapTel, should provide their specific number assigned to that service. It is important that FEMA is able to contact you. Phone calls from FEMA may come from an unidentified number.

Governor Brown: Strives to keep the peace…

Governor Kate Brown
Trying to keep a lid on it downtown...

Despite Governor Brown’s pledge to do all in her power to keep the peace this weekend in downtown Portland…it wasn’t 100% successful.  Here’s the story from KGW-8 in Portland. Click here.

Interested in overseeing short term rental issues in Newport…???

Newport City Hall

CITY OF NEWPORT
SEEKING APPLICANTS TO FILL AN AT-LARGE VACANCY ON THE SHORT-TERM RENTAL ORDINANCE IMPLEMENTATION WORK GROUP

The City of Newport is seeking applicants to fill a citizen at-large position on the Short- Term Rental Ordinance Implementation Work Group.

The Short-Term Rental Ordinance Implementation Work Group shall be charged with the collection and evaluation of information related to the implementation of Ordinance No. 2144 (short-term rental ordinance), including administrative steps taken by the city to carry out the provisions of the ordinance, legal decisions that may influence implementation, reports on permits issued, status of the waitlist, resolution of complaints, and enforcement actions undertaken by the city.

The Short-Term Rental Ordinance Implementation Work Group may also provide recommendations to city administration on how implementation of Ordinance No. 2144, as written, could be improved.

Lastly, the Short-Term Rental Ordinance Implementation Work Group will prepare and present reports to the Planning Commission and City Council summarizing the Work Group’s observations related to the effectiveness of Ordinance No. 2144 in achieving policy objectives.

Anyone interested in filling this vacancy on the Short-Term Rental Ordinance Implementation Work Group should apply using the city’s committee application, which is found on the city website at www.newportoregon.gov; click on “City;” then on

“Committees;” and then on “Application for Committee/Commission.” The completed form can be submitted electronically. Hardcopies of the committee application form can also be obtained by contacting the City Manager’s Office at 169 SW Coast Highway, Newport, Oregon 97365, or by calling 541.574.0613. The application deadline is October 15, 2020.

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