WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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Co. Commissioner Claire Hall says why she seeks re-election to the Lincoln County Commission

Claire Hall
Seeking re-election to the Lincoln County Commission.

Lincoln County Commissioner Claire Hall has filed to run for re-election. Hall, the senior member of the board of commissioners, was first elected in 2004 and has been re-elected three times.

“When I first ran for this job, I said it was the county’s responsibility to make our communities safer, healthier and more prosperous, and I continue to make those goals my priority,” she said. “I’m running on a record of solid achievements, as well as a vision to carry the county into the future.”

Hall cited her leadership on housing and homeless issues on the local and state levels, which helped fund construction of a 110-unit apartment complex opening later this summer in Newport, a 21-unit complex in Yachats, and nearly tripled funding for emergency housing assistance statewide.

Commissioner Hall is a member of the Oregon Housing Stability Council, the main state body setting housing policy and advising the Oregon Housing and Community Services Department.

During her more than 15 years in office, Hall has represented the county on a number of regional, state and national boards and committees. “I was proud to be president of the Oregon Association of Counties in 2017. AOC is an organization that represents elected officials across the political spectrum, and I appreciated their vote of confidence in my fairness and even-handedness.”

Hall says she will continue to improve services for people with mental illness and substance abuse issues who are involved in the criminal justice system. “We know the present approach doesn’t work—it’s clogging the justice system with people who would do better in treatment and helping them toward recovery.”

A three-year, $745,000 federal grant to help launch expanded services was the first major accomplishment in this effort, Hall said. “But even more important is the new culture of cooperation we’ve created between justice, health, hospital, private treatment providers and community agencies. This will be the foundation for new collaborations for years to come.”

Hall added: “I’m proud of my ability to bring people together to find solutions to some of our most significant problems. It’s difficult work, and things don’t happen overnight, but seeing us build a stronger community together is very satisfying.”

Hall is a native Oregonian and has lived in Lincoln County since 1987. She worked in print and broadcast journalism before being elected to county office.

Hey Everyone…we’re not on vacation….been doing some overdue maintenance work

Finishing a lengthy maintenance update….so now it’s back to luggin’ out salt from the mines.  Thanks for everyone’s patience.  With all the work and tweeking we’ve been doing, we might still see a glitch or two.  If you see one, just pass it along to Dave Morgan, News@NewsLincolnCounty.com.  Would love to get some feedback

Dave Morgan

Major Changes in Judiciary by Governor Kate Brown – Lincoln County Scores Big!

Governor Brown Announces Judicial and District Attorney Appointments

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown announced today that she will appoint Jacqueline S. Kamins to the Oregon Court of Appeals, Brendan J. Kane to the Linn County Circuit Court, Marcia L. Buckley to the Lincoln County Circuit Court, and Johnathan H. Cable to the position of District Attorney of Lincoln County (see below).  All four appointments are effective immediately.

“I am proud to elevate this group of talented attorneys to posts in courthouses around our state,” Governor Brown said. “These individuals bring experience from all corners of the legal profession: some have been prosecutors, others defense attorneys. They have litigated everything from family disputes to landlord-tenant cases, and will be well suited to administer equal justice under our laws.”

Jacqueline S. Kamins is an attorney at Markowitz Herbold PC. She fills a vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Erika L. Hadlock. Kamins formerly practiced in the Multnomah County Attorney’s Office, served as a Senior Assistant Attorney General for the Oregon Department of Justice, and litigated civil matters as an attorney at Sonnenschein Nath & Rosenthal LLP in Washington, D.C. She also served as a law clerk for Ninth Circuit Judge Kim McLane Wardlaw. She is a graduate of Columbia University and the University of Virginia School of Law. In addition to her legal practice, Kamins teaches as an adjunct law professor at Lewis & Clark Law School, and volunteers for the Dougy Center for Grieving Children and Families, Portland Homeless Family Solutions, and SMART (Start Making a Reader Today).

Brendan J. Kane is an attorney who represents children in juvenile delinquency court, and children and parents in juvenile dependency court in Albany. He fills a vacancy created by the retirement of Judge DeAnn L. Novotny. He formerly worked as a prosecutor in both Linn and Lincoln Counties. For five years, he managed his own firm representing clients in civil matters. Kane is a graduate of the University of Oregon School of Law and the University of California at Berkeley. Before college, Kane served in the United States Army and received the Combat Infantryman’s Badge for service in Panama.

Marcia L. Buckley is an attorney in private practice who focuses on domestic relations cases. She fills a vacancy created by the retirement of Judge Paulette Sanders. Buckley earlier worked in the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office, where she served as the Chief Deputy District Attorney. She began her career in Portland enforcing child support judgments. Buckley completed both undergraduate studies and law school at Lewis & Clark. She is currently president of the Lincoln County Bar Association and a member of the Oregon State Bar Disciplinary Board. She has also been a board member of the Lincoln County Foundation and the Newport Rotary International Club and she has coached the mock trial team at Newport High School.

Jonathan H. Cable is a criminal defense attorney in Newport. He fills a vacancy created by the resignation of District Attorney Michelle Branam. Previously, for nine years, Cable was a prosecutor in the Lincoln County District Attorney’s Office. He earlier worked as a prosecutor in Ohio, where he began his career. Cable is a graduate of the University of Toledo College of Law and Kent State University. He serves as a board member of Lincoln County Defenders and on the Uniform Criminal Jury Instruction Committee of the Oregon State Bar. In 2011, Cable received the Lincoln County Law Enforcement Recognition Award.

Lincoln County’s 12th Annual Crab Krack Fundraiser – February 9th!!

12TH ANNUAL CRAB KRACK FUNDRAISER FEBRUARY 9

Lincoln County Historical Society’s Annual Crab Krack
4pm, Sunday, February 9th
at the Best Western Agate Beach Inn in Newport

Treat yourself to a super delicious locally caught Dungeness crab dinner and live music in the company of your friends and neighbors. Each year, crab for this event is graciously donated by the Yaquina Bay commercial fishing community. The generosity of a long list of local restaurants and merchants also help make this annual event possible.

This whole crab feast includes various side dishes, an array of desserts, no-host bar, live music by Sons of Beaches, and both a silent and oral auction with special guest auctioneer Representative David Gomberg.

Event proceeds benefit completion of renovations at the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center.

The Agate Beach Inn is offering a special rate for guests attending the festivities, and reservations can be made by calling 541-265-9411, or 800-547-3310 and mentioning “Crab Krack” to get the special rate.

Tickets are available for purchase at the Burrows House and Pacific Maritime Heritage Museums. Cost for Historical Society members is $45 per person, for non-members, $55. Memberships start as low as $20 a year. To become a Member or for more information, to purchase tickets by phone, or reserve your table for 8, call the Historical Society at 541-265-7509. Purchase tickets online by visiting: oregoncoasthistory.org

 

Art Fridays at Newport Visual Arts Center!!

Art Fridays Returns for Winter Session at the Newport Visual Arts Center – New series focus on paper and book arts for middle-school learners…

The Oregon Coast Council for the Arts presents the winter 2020 session of Art Fridays, its popular youth arts-learning program at the Newport Visual Arts Center. The session will run from February 7 to March 20 and focus on paper and book arts—covering techniques such as book construction and binding to block printing, painting with paper and transferring images onto paper.

The Art Fridays program is geared toward 5th to 8th graders, 9-13 years of age.  Classes are led by experienced instructors and practicing artists. Following the winter session, students will be invited to display their work during April and May in the VAC’s Classroom Gallery, coinciding with the 2020 Newport Paper & Book Arts Festival.

Registration fees for the Art Fridays seven-week series are $72, or $12 per class (scholarships are available). All classes are limited to 15 students. Classes are held each Friday, 3:45pm to 5:45pm in the Newport Visual Art Center’s main classroom. Online registrations can be made by clicking here or by visiting coastarts.org and searching for “Art Fridays.” 

For more information (or to register), contact Sara Siggelkow, OCCA’s Arts Learning Coordinator, at 541-574-3364 or ssiggelkow@coastarts.org

Art Fridays Winter 2020 Session
Class Schedule:
February 7, 14 and 21:

Introduction to Book Arts.

Students learn about folded-book and stitched-book construction, and surface design. Students create at least two books with covers and embellishments. Instructors: Jackie Wygant, Janet Webster and Sara Siggelkow

February 28: Block Printing. Students learn how to take an image from idea to stamp that can be used on multiple surfaces. Instructor: Deb Sether

March 6: Block Printing. Students use different colors and textures of cut and torn paper to create a picture/image. Instructor: Eileen Hearne

March 13: Image Transfer. Students take their favorite image and transfer it to different types off paper to create a journal page. Instructor: Deb Sether

March 20: Dynamic Books. Students make a book which is also a moving piece of art. Instructors: Janet Webster and Sara Siggelkow.

Editorial: Realtor Freddy Saxton, President, Lincoln County Board of Realtors

More discussions about Vacation Residential Rentals…Freddy Saxton, President, Lincoln County Board of Realtors

The dust hasn’t even settled in the wake of Newport’s recently enacted extensive anti-VRD legislation yet here we are again discussing further measures to punish it’s law-abiding property owners who have chosen to open their homes to visiting guests.

The process was flawed from the start, after an openly and admittedly biased Planning Commission got together and devised a plan to eliminate VRD’s from their own back yards. A citizen’s advisory group was created to provide the illusion of a level playing field, yet impartial members of the group who expressed any indication of pro-VRD sentiment were bullied and literally shouted at by Planning Committee members during the advisory group meetings. In the end after the council heard significantly more testimony against the new legislation than in support, the Planning Committee got their way as VRD’s effectively became a thing of the past in the bulk of Newport’s geographical area.

The single remotely positive element of the new legislation that made things a little less onerous for existing VRD owners was the provision that existing law-abiding VRD owners could continue to utilize their properties as VRD’s as long as they continue to follow the rules and until they or their immediate heirs cede ownership of the property. All in all the finalized legislation dealt a major blow to VRD owners in the city, but the grandfather provision made it at least “tolerable” and limited financial damages. The notion that a 5-10 year phase out would allow owners to “recoup” their investment before shutting down operations is ludicrous, especially considering the cost of an average oceanfront/view house.

It’s discouraging to think that residents of a town branding itself as “The Friendliest” have developed such an aversion to out of town visitors, who are literally responsible for many of the great amenities we have all come to appreciate and enjoy. The wonderful shops, restaurants and attractions in our community would cease to exist if not for the tourism leg of our economy – not to mention the associated jobs which have long supported a major segment of our population. Want to know what type of amenities a community of our size would have without the infusion of tourism dollars? Look at Sweet Home, Ontario, or La Grande to name just a few.

Despite the picture that opponents of VRD’s are trying to paint, the average VRD guest is not a college frat group partying until the wee hours and creating endless disturbances. The average VRD guest is respectful and here to enjoy and appreciate the beauty and tranquility of the Oregon Coast – just like the rest of us. Mothers, Fathers, Grandparents and children who have taken us on our word when they pass by that “Newport – The Friendliest” sign on their way into town. It’s time that more of us start acting that way.

Freddy Saxton, Principal Broker, CRS, e-PRO, GRI
President, Lincoln County Board of Realtors
Oregon license #20080180
Advantage Real Estate
205 E. Olive
Newport OR 97365
(541) 265-2200 office
(541) 961-2085 cell
(541) 574-7922 fax

Tip of the Week for January 20 – Elk and Deer Winter Migration

Give deer and other wild animals room while walking in the woods or driving along the coast…

Elk and Deer Winter Migration

The Central Oregon Coast is experiencing its seasonal cold weather. Although the weather slows down our daily commute, we are not nearly as affected as wildlife, specifically elk and deer.

Natural food sources are lean in the upper elevations in the coast range during the winter as snow falls, covering the ground. This time of year, with snow accumulation in the coast range and freezing temperatures periodically down to sea level, elk and deer may move to even lower elevations to find adequate food.

These additional movements often mean that the animals are crossing major roads both day and night which creates hazards to motorists. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like motorists and spectators to be mindful of the animal movements. If you see one deer cross in front of you, chances are there is another one behind. 

Please take into account that the animals are often stressed due to additional migration in search of food. When spectating please keep a minimum distance of 100 yards from wildlife. If the animals begin to move from your presence, don’t follow them. Oregon Revised Statute 498.006 does protect the chasing or harassing of wildlife.

Take time to act while there’s still time to act….

Earth heating up
NASA Map

LETTER TO THE EDITOR/ JANUARY 16, 2020
“HOW DARE ME”

I might sound like a broken record when I keep repeating and repeating my alarm concerning our Climate Emergency and the need for deliberate, swift, powerful and sustained action on the part of every governmental body top to bottom as well as every individual left to right.

However, I must first hold myself accountable before my friends, family and the rest of the world; accountable to the dire conditions of my deteriorating and dying Earth. How much more do I need to know before I do something about what has already happened and continues to happen more forcefully day after burning, flooding and devastating day?

How is it that I can hold and kiss my three year old granddaughter and tell her “I love you”, while not doing everything humanly possible to stop what will either eventually kill her or make her life unthinkably miserable? Why is it that I’m not willing to step up to the plate and sacrifice some, if not all, of my presumed entitlements? Like my careless consumption, thoughtless travel, over eating, wasting, endless diversions, addiction to corporate news cycles that render me angry, helpless and brain-dead. How come I have become complacent, inept and comfortable in the face of my dying Earth instead of active in my participatory democracy in order to make things better?

There really is no excuse for continuing my self-indulgent ways except that I don’t care enough to change and update myself to accommodate what is being asked of me presently by what I am destroying presently. So after four decades of steadily rising global warming, with nearly yearly heat breaking records; and most recently with the burning of nine million Australian acres and one thousand koalas, I say unless I am going to do whatever it takes to stop the madness and destruction of my egocentric and capitalistic ways, how dare me continue business as usual.

To learn more about what you might do as well contact 350 Oregon Central Coast.org and complete the contact form – thank you.

Bill Kucha
Depoe Bay
541 765 2451

Car into electrical box at Chinook Winds in Lincoln City

9:33 pm – Elderly man who is suspected of driving drunk crashed his SUV into a high voltage electrical box at Chinook Winds.  The box is located immediately northwest of the main casino building.  The elderly man did not appear to be injured.

MAD FOR MANDOLIN!!

MAD FOR MANDOLIN: JOHN REISCHMAN & THE JAYBIRDS AT THE CULTURAL CENTER SATURDAY, JAN. 25

LINCOLN CITY – Like the powerful mandolinist and composer at its helm, John Reischman and the Jaybirds fashion their own stylish take on bluegrass, one that seamlessly blends original songs and instrumentals with Appalachian old-time music for a distinct and unforgettable band sound. That sound will be ringing through the hall at the Lincoln City Cultural Center on Saturday, Jan. 25. Showtime is 7 pm.

Now in their 20th year, with seven acclaimed albums and two Juno nominations, the Jaybirds are simultaneously innovative and unadorned, sophisticated and stripped down, happily old fashioned as well as 21st century contemporary. They’re touring in support of their latest album, “On That Other Green Shore.”

Reserved table seating tickets for the Jan. 25 show are $25 general, $23 senior/student and $10 for youth ages 18 and under. LCCC Membership Discounts and Complimentary Tickets will be honored. Tickets are on sale at the center box office, and online at www.lincolncity-culturalcenter.org. Or, call the center at 541-994-9994. Doors will open at 6:30 pm.

Bluegrass Unlimited calls John Reischman “one of the world’s undisputed masters” of the mandolin, famed for outstanding tone and taste. Many of his dozens of original instrumentals have become popular favorites for sessions and covers, such as the jam standard “Saltspring”. He has three critically-acclaimed solo instrumental albums and has recorded on many other projects, including the Grammy-winning “True Life Blues: The Songs of Bill Monroe.” John also plays Latin-based jazz and choro music with highly regarded finger-style acoustic guitarist/composer John Miller; the duo has released three superb albums.

John began his career in the San Francisco Bay area in the early ’80s with the eclectic Good Ol’ Persons bluegrass band. He was an original member of the legendary “new acoustic” quartet, the jazz-influenced Tony Rice Unit, renowned for highly skilled instrumentals. John moved to Vancouver in the early ’90s and in 1999 formed the Jaybirds. Of their latest album, Folk Radio UK said: “’On That Other Green Shore’ showcases an accomplished, experienced band at the peak of their powers, with musicianship of the very highest order.” Peghead Nation called it “one of the most beguiling bluegrass-rooted recordings of 2017.”

End of an era along the Newport fishing docks…

Old Undersea Gardens floating exhibit is soon to be no more…

The old Undersea Gardens floating exhibit, that’s been a fixture on the Newport Bayfront for a gazillion years, is being taken apart rather unceremoniously to make way for new fishing docks, which are in dire need to help relieve crowded fish unloading operations. City officials say the Stephen Webster family (Hi Janet!!) contemplates not only unloading docks but some other possibile improvements like an ice house building. Progress on the Bayfront!!

More work along the waterfront for parking and new docks…
Mayor Dean Sawyer photo

ODFW Tip of the Week

They’re out and around….

Elk and Deer Winter Migration

The Central Oregon Coast is experiencing its seasonal cold weather. Although the weather slows down our daily commute, we are not nearly as affected as wildlife, specifically elk and deer.

Natural food sources are lean in the upper elevations in the coast range during the winter as snow falls, covering the ground. This time of year, with snow accumulation in the coast range and freezing temperatures periodically down to sea level, elk and deer may move to even lower elevations to find adequate food.

These additional movements often mean that the animals are crossing major roads both day and night which creates hazards to motorists. The Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office would like motorists and spectators to be mindful of the animal movements. If you see one deer cross in front of you, chances are there is another one behind.

Please take into account that the animals are often stressed due to additional migration in search of food. When spectating please keep a minimum distance of 100 yards from wildlife. If the animals begin to move from your presence, don’t follow them. Oregon Revised Statute 498.006 does protect the chasing or harassing of wildlife.

 

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

PLEASE ATTEND!

Is there a Vacation Rental problem in your residential neighborhood?
Then show up at the City Council meeting

TUESDAY, JANUARY 21, 2020, 6 p.m.
Newport City Hall

The topic of Phase Out of vacation rentals in areas where they are no longer allowed is on the agenda at the TUESDAY, January 21 City Council meeting.

The version of the short-term rental ordinance that passed last May did not include a Phase-Out in areas where vacation rentals are no longer allowed, but all earlier ordinance proposals had, including the one proposed by the City’s Planning Commission. The City Manager assured us that discussion on Phase-Out, and how long a phase-out period was reasonable, would be addressed within the year. It’s time for that discussion to begin and that’s why we placed this matter on the Agenda. We need YOU to show up to show community interest, even if your neighborhood is not directly impacted.

With the new ordinance in place, residents of R1 and R2 neighborhoods anticipated relief from most of the negative vacation rental effects, but bad behavior is not diminishing. It turns out parking violations cannot be enforced if cars are on public streets. Over-occupancy cannot be proven unless a police officer enters a dwelling. Most violations occur on weekends and holidays, but the Community Services Officer is not on duty those days. Home rentals to groups of 18 or more continue because they’re grandfathered in. Documented violations do not become strikes if the problem is corrected. The result is, the intended enforcement is not happening at the street level. It’s time for a Phase-Out of vacation rentals in neighborhoods where they are already no longer allowed.

All we’re asking is for YOU to attend, indicating a show of support for residents who still have concerns about vacation rentals in their R1 and R2 neighborhoods. You do not need to speak. Feel free to leave en masse immediately after the Agenda item concludes to display the number of audience members who care about this topic.

Please show up: TUESDAY, JANUARY 21st.  Meeting starts at 6 p.m.
Thank you,
-Carla Perry

Have you seen this kitty kat?

“Did you happen to pick up a personable, curious, adventurous and smart brown tabby cat while on the central Oregon coast a few months back? This is my cat, Buxton, who has been missing for almost 4 months from Tiny Tranquility, a tiny home park. He’s friendly, but feisty, so I’m holding out hope he’s still alive. He’s sleek, medium-sized, fit, and has a slender face. He loves car rides, so I believe he may have jumped in with someone visiting our park without their realizing.

Buxton is a few months over 3 years old. I’ve had him since he was around 3 weeks old. He’s been with me from Hawaii, to New Hampshire, and now Oregon. He was staying with a friend while I finished a remote assignment, and has been my anchor in my crazy changing world. I really miss him. Please let me know if you’ve seen him or if you’ve been looking after him. Thank you.

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