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Lincoln County Planning Commission Seeks New Members


The Planning Commission plays a key role in the administration of land use planning within the unincorporated areas of Lincoln County. The primary duties of the Commission are to conduct public hearings and help make decisions on local land use applications and permits. The Commission also reviews and makes recommendations on amendments to the comprehensive plan and land use regulations.

The Planning Commission receives staff support from the Lincoln County Department of Planning and Development which is responsible for the administration of land use planning, building inspection, on-site sewage disposal and related land development regulatory programs in the unincorporated areas of the County.
There are two north coast vacancies (north of Cape Foulweather). Regular members serve four-year terms. Members typically meet twice per month from 7-9pm and usually spend an additional 1-3 hours per month studying materials often in preparation for meetings.

Onno Husing, Lincoln County Director of Planning and Development, said, “Being on the Lincoln County Planning Commission is a great way to serve Lincoln County. The issues that come before the Planning Commission have a big impact on people and on our environment.” Husing added, “I urge people to contact us (541-265-4192) if they are interested. We’ll walk them through how the process works and field questions.”

County residents interested in serving on the Planning Commission may download an application on Lincoln County’s web site or pick up an application in the Board of Commissioners Office in Room #110 in the Lincoln County Courthouse, Newport. (Application link – https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/boc/page/committee-and-board-application )
The position is open until filled.

For more information contact: DEPARTMENT OF PLANNING AND DEVELOPMENT – (541) 265-4192
Completed applications may be delivered in person/mailed to, Lincoln County Courthouse, 225 W. Olive Street, Room #110, Newport, OR 97365 or emailed to clmiller@co.lincoln.or.us.

To reach Lincoln County Public Information Officer, Casey Miller: 541-265-0211 clmiller@co.lincoln.or.us

“Tea & Talk” with Sue Friesz

COASTAL ARTS GUILD PRESENTS 

                      “TEA & TALK” WITH SUE FRIESZ

Sue Friesz describes herself as a Pacific Northwest artist who invents her own visual language from observations of nature.     Her contemporary, interdisciplinary work in painting, drawing, sculpture, and assemblage reveal her interest in the aesthetics and structure of trees and plants as well as in the built world.  She is inspired by many sources, from her formative years in the Midwest enjoying the outdoors to her time experiencing other places and cultures while living in Paraguay, Brazil, and Egypt. 

Friesz has exhibited in solo as well as group exhibitions. Her work has been in New American Paintings Exhibition in Print and can also be found in both corporate and private collections. She has won grants from the Avenue of the Arts Foundation and Public Arts Commission in Kansas City, Missouri, and a recipient of the Edwin Austin Abbey Memorial Fund, New York City. Friesz was accepted at Jentel Artist Residency in Wyoming beginning in May.  She now maintains a studio in Newport, Oregon and has an exhibition planned in September at Chessman Gallery in Lincoln City, Oregon.

This coming Thursday the Newport’s Coastal Arts Guild invites you to meet Sue Friesz for “Tea & Talk”.   She will bring examples of her work and talk about her inspirations from Missouri to Egypt to the Oregon Coast.

Thursday, September 1 at 2 pm, Visual Arts Center, 2nd floor.    Enter at the Nye Beach Turnaround entrance, 777 NW Beach Drive, Newport.

Fair Board Seeking New Members

The Lincoln County Board of Commissioners is seeking applications from citizens interested in serving on the Lincoln County Fair Board.

The County and Fair Board recently approved an updated memorandum of agreement (MOU) between the two parties. One provision of the agreement calls for the commissioners to appoint a Fair Board of up to five members. The current three- member board, which has served since 2009, will rotate off the board in the coming months.

The new MOU says the commissioners will seek to appoint a fair board that represents the following interests: land-based agriculture; youth/education; exhibitors, vendors, or local businesses; tourism promotion or visitor services; ocean science, commercial fishing, recreational fishing, or other ocean use sectors; and other interests as determined by the board of commissioners.

There’s no specific requirement that all the identified interests be included on the board at the same time. The overriding consideration will be the commitment of the prospective board members to the successful execution of the annual fair and its long-term plans and coordination of the community use of facilities outside the fair event.

The term of service on the board will be three years.

Deadline to apply is September 30th at 5PM.

The online application form can be found at:

https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/fair/page/fair-board-seeks-new-members

* As it deems appropriate, the Fair Board may make reasonable proposals to the County on ways to more fully utilize the Commons and to meet both the County’s and Fair Board’s interests. The Fair Board will not otherwise exercise authority over the Commons at times other than the County Fair without the express approval of the County. (See MOU for full details) https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/fair/page/fair-board-seeks-new-members

Oregon’s Unemployment Rate Holds Steady at 3.5% in July

Oregon State Capitol

Oregon’s unemployment rate was 3.5% in July, unchanged from 3.5%, as revised, in June. The U.S. unemployment rate was also 3.5% in July. Oregon’s unemployment rate has tracked very closely with the national unemployment rate for the past two years, with both rates declining rapidly during May 2020 through early 2022 as the economies recovered. Over the past five months, unemployment rates for the U.S. and Oregon have averaged 3.6%, near record lows dating back almost 50 years.

The labor market is tight, and many people have gotten back to work. Over the past two years, Oregon’s labor force participation rate rose rapidly. The share of the population 16 and older that is either employed or unemployed reached 63.5% in July, its highest rate in a decade.

In Oregon, nonfarm payroll employment grew by 4,200 in July, following gains averaging 6,300 jobs in the prior eight months. Monthly gains in July were largest in leisure and hospitality (+1,500 jobs), other services (+1,400), manufacturing(+1,300), and private educational services (+1,300). Retail trade (-700 jobs) was the only major industry that shed a substantial number of jobs.

As of July, Oregon has regained 94% of jobs lost at the onset of the pandemic. The U.S. has regained 100%. Oregon’s private sector is close to a full jobs recovery, having regained 99% of pandemic recession losses. However, Oregon’s government sector has only regained 49% of the jobs it lost during March through June 2020.

Professional and technical services was one of the fastest growing industries over the past two years. It added 1,900 jobs in July and has grown by 10,400 jobs since February 2020. Over the past 12 months, architectural and engineering servicesadded 1,700 jobs, or 9.4%, which was the highest growth rate of the component industries within professional and technical services.

Retail trade has inched downward since late last year. In July, it dropped to 209,000 jobs, which is back to where it was in late 2016. Over the past 12 months, the weakest retail trade sectors were building material and garden supply stores (-1,700 jobs) and general merchandise stores (-2,400 jobs).

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