WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

lazerrose title=

audiology title=

barrelhead

prp

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc

audiology title=

barrelhead
prp

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc


barrelhead


Coast Tree

flocs

Stretching out the Coho season…

Coho Salmon
Commons photo

Ocean coho fishing expands to all week on central coast 

NEWPORT, Ore.—From Friday, Sept. 20 through Sunday, Sept. 29, anglers can keep any legal sized salmon they catch in the ocean on the central Oregon coast after fishery managers increased the popular non-selective coho fishery to seven days a week for the final week of the fishery.

The ocean non mark selective coho fishery between Cape Falcon and Humbug Mountain opened Aug. 31 on a schedule of each Friday through Sunday and open for all salmon including coho. During the first three open periods of the season, anglers have landed a total of 8,935 coho out of the quota of 15,640, which leaves eaving 6,700 coho remaining to be caught.

“Fishery managers felt they could open seven days a week for this last part of the season and still remain within the coho quota,” said Eric Schindler, ocean salmon supervising biologist for ODFW. “The non-selective coho fishery in September has been very popular with most anglers, and adding a few more days will provide a few more chances for anglers to catch some nice coho.”

The daily bag limit is two legal size salmon (Chinook >24”; coho >16”; steelhead >20”).  Anglers are reminded that single point barbless hooks are required for ocean salmon angling or if a salmon is on board the vessel in the ocean.

The all-salmon-except-coho fishery from Cape Falcon to Humbug Mountain will remain open through the end of October.

For more information about fishing opportunities including the latest regulations, visit https://myodfw.com/recreation-report/fishing-report/

Watch out for Wildlife this fall, peak migration season for deer and elk

Elk
Wikipedia

Watch out for Wildlife this fall, peak migration season for deer and elk
New license plate raises funds to help wildlife migration

SALEM, Ore.—Late September marks the beginning of the migration period for deer and elk, which must cross major highways as they head towards wintering grounds.

Between 2007-2017, ODOT documented 12,540 animal-vehicle collisions, including deer and elk. The actual number of collisions is higher, as many are not reported if there is minimal damage or no human injuries.

Collisions with deer and elk tend to peak in October and November, when migration and breeding (the “rut”) puts wildlife on the move, making them more likely to cross roads.

ODFW is asking Oregonians to Watch out for Wildlife by being aware of the following:

· The deer breeding season typically lasts from late October to late November, increasing deer activity and the potential for deer to cross roads.
· During the next few months there will be fewer daylight hours and visibility will be challenged by darkness and winter weather conditions.
· Be attentive at all times, especially sunset to sunrise for any potential hazard on or near the highway.
· When driving in areas that have special signs indicating the possible presence of wildlife, please use extra caution. These signs are posted for a reason.
· Be cautious in areas with dense vegetation along the road or while going around curves. Wildlife near the road may not be visible.
· If you see one animal, stay alert for others nearby.
· When wildlife are near or on the roadway, reduce your speed and stay in your lane. Many serious crashes are the result of drivers losing control as they swerve to avoid wildlife.
· The same advice applies for smaller wildlife like raccoons – try to stay in your lane and do not swerve for these animals. They are less dangerous to vehicles than big game animals; losing control of the vehicle is a larger concern.
· Always wear your seat belt, even the slightest collision could result in serious injuries.

Highway 97 south of Bend is a hot spot for wildlife vehicle collisions as it runs through a historical deer migration route. ODOT has worked with ODFW, the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, Oregon Hunters Association and others to build wildlife crossings that allow wildlife to safety cross over or under this busy highway. Currently there are two undercrossings near Sunriver that have reduced wildlife vehicle collisions by 90 percent since 2012. To the south, a third undercrossing is under construction north of Gilchrist and more are planned in central Oregon.

Dedicated funds are critical for implementing projects to support safe wildlife migration. The non-profit Oregon Wildlife Foundation (OWF) is currently selling vouchers for a Watch for Wildlife license plate featuring a mule deer and Cascade Range mountain in the background. OWF has a long history of providing grants for projects that benefit fish and wildlife in Oregon, including helping rid Diamond Lake of tui chub to restore the trout fishery and supporting the Bonneville Fish Hatchery Sturgeon Viewing Pond.

Once 3,000 vouchers are sold, the DMV will put the plate into production. OWF will award the annual monies raised from license plate sales to projects that help wildlife move safely within their range and between habitat patches. Examples of projects that could be funded with Watch for Wildlife license plate proceeds include not only traditional wildlife underpasses like those on Hwy 97, but others like the Harborton Frog Shuttle, an all-volunteer effort that transports threatened red-legged frogs along their migratory route across busy Hwy 30 in Northwest Portland.

Visit OWF’s website for more information, https://www.myowf.org/

Coast drug pusher sent to prison for ten years….

Methamphetamine
Wikipedia image

Tilamook County Felon Sentenced to 20 Years in Prison for Dealing Drugs and Illegally Possessing a Firearm
EUGENE, Ore.—Jon Michael Walsh, 46, of Neskowin, has been sentenced today to 20 years in federal prison and 10 years’ supervised release for possessing with intent to distribute methamphetamine and heroin and illegally possessing a firearm as a convicted felon.

According to court documents, in February 2018, Walsh was on post-prison supervision for a 2015 federal firearms conviction, when probation officers conducted a routine search of his vehicle outside a community center and found a stolen loaded pistol and concealed packages of methamphetamine and heroin.

During a subsequent search of Walsh’s Neskowin residence, officers found additional distribution quantities of methamphetamine and heroin. Walsh later admitted to buying and selling methamphetamine and heroin in Lincoln and surrounding coastal counties to support his own methamphetamine addiction.

On March 8, 2019, Walsh pleaded guilty to one count each of possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine, possession with intent to distribute heroin and felon in possession of a firearm. Walsh admitted to dealing methamphetamine and heroin while possessing the loaded pistol to protect himself and drug supplies.

Walsh previously served nine years in federal prison for distributing methamphetamine while in possession of a firearm after being sentenced in June 1998.

This case was investigated by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), Oregon State Police, Tillamook County Sheriff’s Office and the Lincoln City Police Department. It was prosecuted by Frank R. Papagni, Jr., Assistant U.S. Attorney for the District of Oregon, and Michelle Branam, Lincoln County District Attorney.

The case was brought as part of Project Safe Neighborhoods (PSN). PSN is the centerpiece of the Department of Justice’s violent crime reduction efforts. PSN is an evidence-based program proven to be effective at reducing violent crime. Through PSN, a broad spectrum of stakeholders work together to identify the most pressing violent crime problems in the community and develop comprehensive solutions to address them. As part of this strategy, PSN focuses enforcement efforts on the most violent offenders and partners with locally based prevention and reentry programs for lasting reductions in crime.

barrelhead


Coast Tree

flocs

Coast Tree

flocs

Coast Tree

flocs

nlcad

Follow-us-tile