Weather or Not: The Back and Forth of Fall

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Sep 252017
 

Monday, Sep. 25th – Lincoln County

Summary: Cloudy early, sunny later yesterday; mixed skies overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 60F/51F/19mph/0.00”
Depoe Bay: 63F/47F/11mph/0.00”
Newport: 63F/46F/18mph/0.00”
Waldport: 62F/52F/16mph/0.00”
Yachats: 60F/51F/24mph/0.00”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: broken @ 11,000’
Visibility: 7 miles/Wind: calm/Altimeter: 30.15”

Forecast: We’ll be back and forth for the next few days. Look for mostly cloudy skies with a chance of rain today and tonight as a weak weather system slides by north of us. High 60F, low around 55F. Decreasing clouds tomorrow, high of 65F. Outlook is for a brief blast of Summer-like conditions on Wednesday when the mercury rises to 70F or better under sunny skies, then partly cloudy, cooler and a slight chance of rain again Thursday night and Friday, followed by lots of sunshine for the weekend, albeit temps will be seasonal as the thermometer hits 60F during the day and dips into the low-50s overnight.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temps near 50F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 50-55F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 55-60F, and I-84 is now open to traffic with only a few ramp closures still in effect, including Multnomah Falls. For the Cascades, highways are mainly dry, 35-40F, the free air freezing level is 10,000 feet. * An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are light and variable this morning, with seas 3-4 feet at 10 seconds. Light winds are expected through today and for most of tomorrow before northerlies increase late on Tuesday as a thermal trough builds up the coast. Expect to see gusts over 20 knots starting Tuesday evening and continue through mid-day Wednesday before switching offshore and the gradient weakens. Beyond Wednesday, winds will stay light for the remainder of the week. Seas will remain 4-6 feet through the period. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Mainly overcast, light winds, surf 2-3 feet (low).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
09/25 Mon 9:56 AM 2.89 L
09/25 Mon 4:03 PM 7.62 H
09/25 Mon 10:53 PM 1.02 L
09/26 Tue 5:31 AM 6.19 H

In Short: Mostly cloudy, slight chance of rain, then clearing and warmer.

Oregon Coast Jazz Party in Newport – October 6-8 at Newport PAC!

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Sep 252017
 

George Colligan Trio
Newport Jazz Party
October 6-8


Houston Person
Newport Jazz Party
October 6-8


Chuck Redd
Newport Jazz Party
October 6-8


Greta Matassa
Newport Jazz Party
October 6-8


(Newport, Oregon) – Celebrate America’s greatest art form with three days of live jazz and jazz education on the Oregon coast. The 14th annual Oregon Coast Jazz Party is set for October 6 – 8 at the Newport Performing Arts Center (PAC) and at the Shilo Inn Suites Hotel, both in Newport.

This year’s groovin’ festivities include a vast variety of jam sessions, concerts with themes and ensembles created out of mixing up band members. There is also a special brewmaster’s dinner held in conjunction with the festival.

From small, almost informal beginnings, the Oregon Coast Jazz Party has risen up to be a powerful draw to Newport every early October. The three-day weekend brings in hundreds of people each year, infusing over $150,000 into the local economy.

Click here for more info

The Lineup

The 2017 lineup, coordinated by OCJP Music Director Holly Hofmann (who will also perform this year), includes returning favorites John Clayton on bass, Gerald Clayton on piano, guitarist Ed Dunsavage, drummer Jeff Hamilton, bassist Mary Ann McSweeney, Houston Person on tenor sax, drummer Chuck Redd, and pianist Mike Wofford.

Appearing for the first time at this party are the incredible George Cables Trio, led by pianist George Cables with bassist Essiet Okon Essiet and drummer Victor Lewis. The innovative George Colligan Trio is led by pianist, composer and multi-instrumentalist George Colligan, featuring bassist Chris Higgins and drummer Chris Brown. There is the Bossanaire Septet, a bossa nova rhythm section featuring two female vocalists, reminiscent of the 1960s-era classic “Sergio Mendes & Brasil ’66” album, and the music of Stan Getz and João Gilberto.

Special artists appearing solo or in other combos are guitarist Russell Malone, Thomas Marriott on trumpet, vocalist Greta Matassa, and drummer Ryan Shaw.

Click here for details

Education at the Party

The party always includes free jazz education at the Newport Performing Arts Center, 777 W. Olive in Newport.

At 3:45 p.m. Saturday, October 7, don’t miss “Jazz 101 – What to Listen For?,” a free jazz demo/lecture sponsored by Just Jazz features pianist Mike Wofford, bassist John Clayton, drummer Jeff Hamilton and flutist Holly Hofmann.

The panel discussion is a very popular interactive question-and-answer session about jazz and jazz artists at 10 a.m. Sunday, October 8. Hosted by OCJP Music Director and renowned jazz flutist Holly Hofmann, the panel features John Clayton, Mary Ann McSweeney and Chuck Redd – all of whom are also acclaimed arrangers and composers in their own right. Both events are free and open to the public.

Click here for details

North Coast Brewing Brewmaster Dinner

Enjoy North Coast Brewing’s fine artisan beers paired with cuisine by Newport’s Clearwater Restaurant at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 5 at the Yaquina Bay Yacht Club. North Coast Brewing’s Old Rasputin Russian imperial stout and renowned Belgian style abbey ale, Brother Thelonious, will be served with cheeses at the pre-dinner reception.

Dinner begins with a port wine poached-pear salad with Humble Fog cheese, baby mâche, and a balsamic reduction, followed by a pan-seared scallop with vanilla-infused yams and brown butter orange sauce. The main course of braised boneless short ribs will be served with fresh corn polenta, heirloom carrots, and merlot demi-glace, and a brownie sundae dessert wraps up the dinner.

Click here for details

Featured North Coast artisan brews include the Le Merle saison farmhouse ale, Red Seal ale, and the Cranberry Quince Berliner Weiss.

All dinner reservations must be made in advance by calling the Oregon Coast Council for the Arts, the founding organization of the Jazz Party. Call 541-265-2787 for details. Limited seating is available for the Brewmaster Dinner; cost per person is $65; deadline for reservations is October 2.

Tickets, Seating, Discounts

All seating is reserved; ticket prices vary by session. Buy tickets online at oregoncoastjazzparty.org or through the PAC box office, 777 W. Olive Street in Newport or at 541-265-2787. See more about the musicians, learn more about the event, and download the brochure on the Oregon Coast Jazz Party mini-site at oregoncoastjazzparty.org.

For local jazz fans who want to join the party, OCCA offers discounts on all sessions except Session 5; OCCA members get discounts on all sessions. Get your locals or OCCA member discounts or tickets at the Newport Performing Arts Center box office, 777 W. Olive Street.

Click here for info

For a brochure, more information and tickets, visit oregoncoastjazzparty.org or call (541) 265-ARTS (2787).

Oregon Coast Jazz Party 2017 is underwritten by Rev. Carol Stubbs Smith, with support from the North Coast Brewing Co. (official jazz party brew), Columbia Bank, Newport News-Times and Oregon Coast Piano Services, as well as Milt Bernhart Travel (official jazz party travel agency), Elizabeth Street Inn, Just Jazz, Yaquina Bay Communications, and 2017 Jazz Club members Henry & Liz Cardinale, Jim & Sue Douglas, Robert Emrich & Cindy Heisler, Frank & Michelle Geltner, Robert & Melissa Good, JJ Hendricks, Hogan Family Trust, Jocelyn Howells, Claire & Ray Little, Roger Leo, James & Jean Morrison, David & Anne Noall, John & Diana Pinto, Vern Schervem, and Barry & Phyllis Winters. A continuing facet of support this year has come from the event’s Jazz Hotels, which include the the Whaler Hotel and the Hallmark Inns & Resort. Each has donated room-nights for artist lodging. Check for special Oregon Coast Jazz Party rates at these locations. OCCA is also grateful for the support of the many jazz partners, musician and youth sponsors, patrons and friends who also contribute.

Last Toledo Street Market of 2017 coming up….

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Sep 252017
 

Toledo Street Market, Thursdays, 10-3, Main Street, Last Market of the year this Thursday!

Toledo Thursday Market
10-3 on Main Street


Toledo Street Market ends for the season this Thursday in Toledo.


TOLEDO STREET MARKET will be closing the season on Thursday September 28th.
We want to invite our loyal shoppers to come by and help us end this year on a high note and look for some fantastic bargains and friendly faces. 10 am until 3 pm.
toledostmarketoregon.com or email at about@toledostmarketoregon.com

Boat and crew rescue off Newport

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Sep 242017
 

6:30pm
The Coast Guard has launched out toward the Newport jetties to tow a 31 foot pleasure craft in to port. Reports say the craft, with three aboard, lost engine power.

6:45pm
Coast Guard has the boat in tow. They’ll be tied up in no time.

Click here for Details

Filing for Social Security

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Sep 242017
 

Duane J. Silbernagel
Financial Advisor
Waddell & Reed


Free Presentation at Newport 60+ Activity Center
SOCIAL SECURITY SEMINAR WITH DUANE J. SILBERNAGEL, CFP® 
FINANCIAL ADVISOR WITH WADDELL & REED

On Monday, October 16th, from 6:00 – 7:30 p.m., Duane Silbernagel, CFP®, a Financial Advisor with Waddell & Reed, Inc., will present “Filing for Social Security: Choices for Your Retirement Income.”

Social Security is our country’s single largest Federal program and the sole means of support for many retirees. Duane invites you to learn how you can optimize your retirement income needs with Social Security.

Duane grew up in Scio, Oregon, and moved to Lincoln County with his wife in 2010. He earned his BS in Civil Engineering from the Oregon Institute of Technology, and worked in that field for 3 years before becoming a Financial Advisor. Duane says, “So much of what I do is outside the investment aspect of my capabilities. I help people put together their financial plan; outlining where they are now, where they want to go, and the avenues to pursue those goals. In my experience, these concerns grow more prevalent as one approaches retirement.”

Click here for Details

This educational presentation about Social Security filing options includes ample opportunity for questions. There is no charge for this event, and you are welcome to bring guests. Light refreshments provided.

The seminar is a general overview of certain rules related to Social Security, and the ideas presented are not individualized for your particular situation. Please discuss your individual circumstances with your Financial Advisor. Waddell & Reed is a member SIPC.

The 60+ Activity Center is located at 20 SE 2nd Street in Newport. Please R.S.V.P. to Abbie Summers at 541-614-1322 or ASummers@WRAdvisors.com.

To see a complete list of our activities, exercise classes, events, and trips, please visit our website at www.newportoregon.gov/sc, call 541-265-9617, or stop by at 20 SE 2nd St, Newport, OR.

Weather or Not: Arguing for Space

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Sep 242017
 

Sunday, Sep. 24th – Lincoln County

Summary: Cloudy early, sunbreaks later yesterday; mixed skies overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 63F/50F/9mph/0.00”
Depoe Bay: 63F/51F/10mph/0.00”
Newport: 63F/46F/9mph/0.01”
Waldport: 63F/52F/8mph/0.00”
Yachats: 60F/51F/15mph/0.00”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: overcast @ 100’
Visibility: 1.25 miles/Wind: calm/Altimeter: 30.17”

Forecast: Clouds and sunshine will be arguing for sky space today, light winds and a high in the low-60s. Mostly cloudy tonight, low 50F. Cloudy skies are expected tomorrow, the thermometer rising to 60-65F. Outlook is for a chance of rain tomorrow night, then mainly clear, patchy morning fog, afternoon/evening sea breezes and warmer temps as the mercury climbs to 65-70F during the day and drops to 50-55F at night. Long-term projections show wetter and cooler weather developing in about a week.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temps 40-45F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 45-50F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 45-55F, and I-84 remains closed in places due to wildland firefighting operations. For the Cascades, highways are mainly dry but spots of ice are possible, 30-35F, the free air freezing level is 9,000 feet.

* Outlook for weekend travelers is dry roads at all elevations including the Coast Range and Cascades through tonight.

* An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are ENE 5-15 knots this morning, with seas 4-5 feet at 8 seconds. Quiet marine weather continues today and into midweek with light winds 15 knots or less and seas generally below 6 feet. North winds will start to increase late in the day on Tuesday as a thermal tough builds up the coast. Small craft strength winds are likely and will begin in the southern waters before expanding northward. These gusty winds will likely be short-lived as the gradient relaxes and winds switch to offshore by late in the day Wednesday. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Clouds and sunshine, light winds, surf 3-4 feet (low).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
09/24 Sun 9:17 AM 2.29 L
09/24 Sun 3:26 PM 7.97 H
09/24 Sun 10:03 PM 0.77 L
09/25 Mon 4:32 AM 6.61 H

In Short: Mixed skies, chance of rain, then clearing and warmer.

Using control burns to clean out the forest floor is not only a good thing, it makes our forests healthier

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Sep 232017
 

Losing an entire forest because of thick vegetation on the ground under the trees…
BLM photo


The current wildfire season in Central Oregon, and in many areas around the West, has been called one of the worst in human history – with an emphasis on “human” history. Long before humans with their fire trucks, borate bombers and bulldozers came on the scene, Mother Nature pretty much took care of her forests using a natural resource – namely lightning. Lightning was the fire starter that caused enough fires so that fires seldom got so big it would take down an entire forest or watershed. The “understory” brush and smaller trees were periodically “cleaned out” to allow the already established forest to grow big and tall, purifying the air and providing cover and shelter for wildlife, not to mention the cleanest water on the planet.

But then along came Smoky the Bear. The message from an animal (that should have known better) became the mouthpiece for fire-avoiding humans who believed fire was the enemy of the forest rather than it’s closest friend.

Lightning continued to set Mother Nature’s summer cleaning routine. But because humans had cut her fires short, the forest floor literally disappeared behind a wall of undergrowth that now burns so hot and with flames so high, that the lower branches of trees ignite and blow up and entire forest.

Smoky the Bear’s family never had a chance. They were killed along with other wildlife that suffered due to human-kind’s utter ignorance of how forests came to be and how they thrive.

Click here for details

But today, humans are beginning to catch on that fire is the best friend a forest has. But, rather than relying just on lightning to do the job of “house cleaning,” local, state and federal forestry officials have increasingly committed themselves to conducting strategically targeted “control burns,” hoping to catch up with Mother Nature in her eon’s old campaign to produce the best forests the world has ever seen. The article below clearly illustrates that our forest managers, right down to private forest property owners, have seen the light on being better stewards of our forest lands.

From U.S. Forest Service

Did you know fire can be good for people and the land? After many years of fire exclusion, an ecosystem that needs periodic fire becomes unhealthy. Trees are stressed by overcrowding; fire-dependent species disappear; and flammable fuels build up and become hazardous.

So, as a matter of fact the right fire at the right place at the right time can be quite beneficial:

* Reduces hazardous fuels, protecting human communities from extreme fires;
* Minimizes the spread of pest insects and disease;
* Removes unwanted species that threaten species native to an ecosystem;
* Provides forage for game;
* Improves habitat for threatened and endangered species;
* Recycles nutrients back to the soil; and
* Promotes the growth of trees, wildflowers, and other plants;

Click here for details

The Forest Service manages prescribed fires and even some wildfires to benefit natural resources and reduce the risk of unwanted wildfires in the future. The agency also uses hand tools and machines to thin overgrown sites in preparation for the eventual return of fire.
More prescribed fires mean fewer extreme wildfires.

Specialists write burn plans for prescribed fires. Burn plans identify – or prescribe – the best conditions under which trees and other plants will burn to get the best results safely.

Burn plans consider temperature, humidity, wind, moisture of the vegetation, and conditions for the dispersal of smoke. Prescribed fire specialists compare conditions on the ground to those outlined in burn plans before deciding whether to burn on a given day.

Click here for details