Weather or Not: DIY

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May 242017
 

News Lincoln County’s weatherman is off today, so use the links below for do-it-yourself forecasts, observations and conditions. Our daily ‘Weather or Not’ reports resume tomorrow morning.

wxon-twitterNOTE: Weather or Not’s Twitter feed will still keep you posted on any major changes in conditions, and you’ll get updated travel info and an abbreviated forecast each morning tailored to the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Summary: Observations

Forecast: Lincoln City, Depoe Bay, Newport, Waldport, Yachats

Travel: ODOT TripCheck, Activity Planner, Coast Range, Cascades

Marine: Local Waters, Bar Reports

Tides: Tide Tables

 Posted by at 8:00 AM

A tax by any other name would levy just as well…

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May 242017
 

State Capitol
Salem

Oregon’s financial woes could be made worse by a speeding PERS retirement runaway train if a certain piece of legislation doesn’t get a big thumbs up this week, or early next.

Since Measure 97 failed in an attempt to slap a corporate income tax on larger Oregon businesses, the plan in the democratically legislature is to slap a very small sales type tax on all large corporations doing business in Oregon.

The “Gross Receipts Tax,” as it’s called, looks at one thing. How much revenue did the corporation take in during the tax year, and not how much, in the opinion of the corporation, did it “net” in terms of profits. Lawmakers say the gross receipts tax is more equalitarian in that everybody’s paying a given rate right off the top.

Will it make it through the legislature? Some say it’s got a pretty good chance, but the democrats will need a little help from some of “slightly” leftish conservative friends who know it’s not cheap to run a state.

Here’s more from The Oregonian. Click here.

 Posted by at 12:52 AM

Every Lincoln County School District family will get summer food assistance

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May 232017
 

Oregon Trail Card


All LCSD families to receive $86 in summer food assistance

(NEWPORT) – Every family with a child attending public school in Lincoln County will receive an Oregon Trail card in June as part of a demonstration study aimed at providing food assistance to children during the summer months.

Made in three installments, families will receive a total of $86 loaded onto the card for food purchases as part of the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Summer Electronic Benefits Transfer for Children (SEBTC) program.

Although SEBTC has been offered in many Oregon communities since 2011, this is the first time Lincoln County has been included. According to USDA, nationwide expansion of the program in 2017 “would result in thousands of children being spared from food insecurity over the next decade.”

Because of the high number of low-income children in the Lincoln County School District (LCSD), the State determined that all children within the district are eligible for this program, which is designed to address any gaps for those students unable to participate in free summer meal programs.

“LCSD School Nutrition Services provides summer meal sites throughout Lincoln County, but ours is a large county with many rural areas and that makes it difficult for many students and families to take advantage of these meals,” said Julie Baldwin, LCSD Director of Business Services. Visit the district website at www.lincoln.k12.or.us for a complete list of summer meal sites. This summer program will provide families with “an additional boost to their food budget,” Baldwin added, noting that the district also assists families during the school year by serving 300,000 breakfasts and 520,000 lunches, as well as 28,000 dinners at after-school locations – all at no cost to students.

Participation in the SEBTC program is optional. Although all families with a school-aged child will receive an Oregon Trail card and are invited to participate, only those who choose to activate it will receive the funds. Much like credit card activation, the receiving family will make a simple phone call to activate the account. In those instances where a card is not activated or monies not used by Sept. 5, 2017, funds will be retained by the State of Oregon, according to program officials.
After the one-time activation, funds become available to families on the following timetable: $21 on June 10, $30 on July 1, and $35 on Aug. 1. Families with more than one child will see those amounts multiplied by the number of school-aged children. Those who already have an Oregon Trail card will see the funds added to their existing account.

Officials project the program could bring as much as $465,000 grocery dollars into Lincoln County, helping businesses as well as families. Those funds are subject to the same food-only restrictions as other assistance programs offered through the Oregon Trail card.

For more information about SEBTC or other Lincoln County School District nutrition assistance programs, contact Jamie Nicholson, LCSD Child Nutrition Program Manager, at (541)265-4420.

 Posted by at 10:39 PM

Do or die week for state lawmakers trying to take a more direct route to pushing up business taxes

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May 232017
 

State Capitol
Salem

Oregon’s financial woes made worse by a speeding PERS retirement runaway train might get solved this week if a certain piece of legislation gets the vote it needs.

Since Measure 97 failed in an attempt to slap a corporate income tax on larger Oregon businesses, the plan in the democratically legislature is to slap a very small sales type tax on all large corporations doing business in Oregon.

The “Gross Receipts Tax,” as it’s called, looks at one thing. How much revenue did the corporation take in during the tax year, and not how much, in the opinion of the corporation, did it “net” in terms of profits. Lawmakers say the gross receipts tax is more equalitarian in that everybody’s paying a given rate right off the top.

Will it make it through the legislature? Some say it’s got a pretty good chance, but the democrats will need a little help from some of “slightly” leftish conservative friends who know it’s not cheap to run a state.

Here’s more from The Oregonian. Click here.

 Posted by at 5:42 PM

Health Advisories likely for Oregon Beaches – Heads up and pay attention to OHA Alerts

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May 232017
 

Nye Beach
Sara Schneiber photo

Warmer weather ushers in 2017 Oregon beach monitoring season
New ‘beach action values’ mean state is likely to see more health advisories

As temperatures rise in advance of the Memorial Day weekend, the Oregon Health Authority is launching its 2017 beach monitoring season to keep people informed about bacteria levels along the coast that may pose a health risk.

The Oregon Beach Monitoring Program, based at the OHA Public Health Division, began its annual, regular evaluation of bacteria levels at beaches up and down the Oregon Coast, from Seaside to Brookings, May 22. Each year’s monitoring period extends through Labor Day weekend.

The 18 beaches that will be monitored in 2017 include:

* Seaside Beach, Cannon Beach, Tolovana State Park Beach, Clatsop County
* Short Sand State Park Beach, Rockaway Beach, Twin Rocks Beach, Neskowin State Park Beach, Tillamook County
* D River State Park Beach, Beverly Beach, Agate State Park Beach, Nye Beach, Seal Rock State Park Beach, Lincoln County
* Heceta Beach, Lane County
* Bastendorff Beach, Sunset Bay State Park Beach, Coos County
* Hubbard Creek Beach, Harris Beach State Park, Crissey Field State Park, Curry County

Beaches will be monitored for beach action values, or BAVs, the marine recreational water quality standard used to determine if bacteria levels are unsafe for water contact. When a single marine water sample has bacteria levels at or above the BAV, a health advisory is issued. Once a health advisory is issued, people are asked to avoid water contact until the health advisory is lifted.

Since 2003 OHA has used a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency grant to monitor popular Oregon beaches and make timely reports to the public about elevated levels of fecal bacteria. State organizations participating in this program are the Oregon Health Authority, Department of Environmental Quality, and Parks and Recreation Department.

The state expects to see more beach advisories than in previous years because new BAVs are being used in 2017. In 2014 the Environmental Protection Agency updated its national beach guidance and required performance criteria for grants. EPA studies found that recreating in water with bacteria levels below the previous BAV of 158 colony-forming units per 100 milliliters of water (cfu/100mL) poses a health risk. EPA now requires states that receive funding for beach monitoring to adopt a new BAV that is more protective of the public’s health. The updated guidance provides safer standards for recreational waters across the U.S. and will help focus resources on the highest priority beaches.

OBMP will apply a BAV of 130 cfu/100mL for the 2017 monitoring season.

OBMP initially set a new BAV of 70 cfu/100mL for 2017, and shared it with partners, stakeholders and the public last year. But the program proposed an alternative of 130 cfu/100mL to EPA for a number of reasons: summer coastal water temperatures on the Oregon Coast are colder than those found in locations studied by EPA, which limits the amount of time the most vulnerable population—children—are likely to spend time in the water; fecal bacteria concentrations in coastal waters are highly variable, which makes water quality predictions difficult; and a 70 cfu/100mL BAV would double the number of beach advisories, stretching program resources and requiring reductions in activities, such as monitoring frequency, the number of monitoring stations and efforts to find contamination sources.

“We are confident the new BAV strikes the right balance of health protection based on how Oregonians and visitors use our beaches,” said Curtis Cude, manager of the Public Health Division’s environmental public health surveillance program, which administers the OBMP.

Beach advisories will be publicized in OHA news releases throughout the 2017 season and will be posted at http://www.healthoregon.org/beach. To view a video about the 2017 beach monitoring season, visit https://youtu.be/NLgR9N3WChY.

 Posted by at 4:57 PM

Hormone Therapy: Risk to one’s hearing?

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May 232017
 

Dr. Anne McEachern
Dr. of Audiology
Sea Towne Shopping Center
Click here for details

Sponsored Content

Le’Anne McEachern, Au.D.
Doctor of Audiology

Study Shows Hormone Therapy Increases Hearing Loss Risk

Hearing loss afflicts approximately 48 million Americans and the number is expected to increase as the population ages.

Hearing loss afflicts approximately 48 million Americans and the number is expected to increase as the population ages. Some previous studies suggested that menopause may increase the risk for hearing loss, presumably due to the reduction in circulating estrogen levels, and that postmenopausal hormone therapy might slow hearing decline by ‘replacing’ estrogen. To investigate the role of menopause and postmenopausal hormone therapy as risk factors for hearing loss, researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital prospectively examined the independent links between menopausal status, oral hormone therapy, and risk of self-reported hearing loss in 80,972 women in the Nurses’ Health Study II followed from 1991-2013. The findings are published online n Menopause, The Journal of the North American Menopause Society.

During the study period, 23 percent of the participants developed hearing loss. Researchers found no significant overall association between menopausal status and risk of hearing loss, although higher risk was associated with older age at natural menopause. Use of postmenopausal hormone therapy was associated with higher risk of hearing loss, and the risk tended to increase with longer duration of use.

“Many factors contribute to acquired hearing loss, including age, genetics, noise, medical conditions, diet and lifestyle factors,” stated Sharon Curhan, MD, ScM, lead author of the paper and a researcher at the Channing Division of Network Medicine at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. “Our research focuses on identifying preventable contributors to hearing loss. Although the role of sex hormones in hearing is complex and incompletely understood, these findings suggest that women who undergo natural menopause at an older age may have a higher risk. In addition, longer duration of postmenopausal hormone therapy use is associated with higher risk. These findings suggest that hearing health may be a consideration for women when evaluating the risks and benefits of hormone therapy,” Curhan said.

Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH) is a 793-bed nonprofit teaching affiliate of Harvard Medical School and a founding member of Partners HealthCare. BWH has more than 4.2 million annual patient visits and nearly 46,000 inpatient stays, is the largest birthing center in Massachusetts and employs nearly 16,000 people.

SeaTowne Shopping Center
1622 N. Coast Highway
Newport, OR 97365
541 272-5015

 Posted by at 3:20 PM

President Trump wants to sell off the BPA – The northwest’s publicly owned power provider

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May 232017
 

Bonneville Dam
Managed by the Bonneville Power Administration


In an effort to build a wall across the country’s southern border with Mexico, increase military spending and re-invigorating the American economy, President Trump is resorting to some very unpopular methods of raising the money. Not only is he proposing huge cuts to womens’ health programs, he’s now proposing to sell off the Pacific Northwest’s primary source for reasonably priced electricity – the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA).

The BPA was created in 1937 as a job program aimed at bringing affordable energy to the Pacific Northwest from the Grand Coulee and Bonneville dams. Cheap hydro-power from these first two monster reservoirs along with many others built since, northwest residents have enjoyed power that is far cheaper than what the private sector charges for their power. Sometimes at half the rates of private power.

But President Trump wants to sell the BPA to the private sector, which would most assuredly guarantee that everyone’s power bills would rise as much as 50%. Oregon Senator Ron Wyden says every now and then somebody will come along and suggest such a sell-off, but he says “Pacific northwest families have already paid off that investment, so the PEOPLE own BPA. And as far as he’s concerned, it’s not for sale. Wyden says “This is but another (literally) power grab by those who think nothing of robbing our friends, neighbors and co-workers of the fruits of their investing in BPA through the decades. President Trump’s proposal is destined to be tossed into the nearest trash can.” Wyden told reporters that there have been many attempts in the past to “hijack” the BPA. “It just ain’t gonna happen,” Wyden said.

 Posted by at 12:23 PM

Lincoln County’ job situation sorta flattened out in April

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May 232017
 

Archive graphic

Lincoln County expected to add something over 300 jobs in April, but it fell about thirty short. The private sector added well over 200 new jobs and government employment inched up 10, but overall, somewhat of a lucklaster performance – especially when compared to the rest of the state. The Portland Metro’s jobless rate fell to 3.2% on average.

Lincoln County’s jobless rate in April was 4.4%, the same as in March. But it’s still a lot better than it was a year ago when the jobless rate was right around 5%. At the moment, Lincoln County’s jobless rate is right at the national average. Clatsop County in April was 3.7%, Tillamook County at 3.8%. Benton at 2.8%. Linn at 4.3. The Medford metro came in at 4.2% in April, Eugene at 4.0%, Salem at 3.8%, Albany at 4.3 and Bend-Redmond metrol at 3.6%.

 Posted by at 11:57 AM