Missing Kitty in Newport – Yaquina Heights Drive

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Aug 292015
 
Katya is missing.  Seen her?  Call

Katya is missing. Seen her? Call 541-265-7302 or 541-908-1954

From a reader:

Our kitty is missing. Her name is Katya and has been missing since Thursday night. We live on Yaquina Heights Dr, at the east end where it meets HWY 20. She is a little less than 9 lbs, and isn’t wearing a collar.

If you’ve seen her, please call 541-265-7302 or 541-908-1954 (cell)

 Posted by at 10:21 AM

Weather or Not: High Wind/Storm Warning/Big Surf

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Aug 292015
 

Chris Burns Weather

Saturday, August 29th – Lincoln County

Summary: High clouds, hazy sunshine, muggy air, warm temperatures of 70F or better and light winds paint yesterday’s picture, at least until midnight. That’s when the leading edge of the usually strong late-Summer storm arrived; cloud cover thickened and the wind flashed up to 20-25 mph out of the southwest. As the night wore on, the breeze continued to increase and by 4:00am it was howling 35 mph gusting 50 or more. Peak gusts around the area were 61 mph at Yachats and 86 mph on Mary’s Peak in the Coast Range east of Newport. There wasn’t a lot of rain with this storm and precipitation totals so far have been under a quarter inch. At daybreak, the sou’westers blew even harder, it was overcast and spittin’ a little rain.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 76F/63F/53mph/0.16”
Depoe Bay: 70F/60F/45mph/0.18”
Newport: 68F/59F/53mph/0.12”
Waldport: 65F/55F/59mph/0.23”
Yachats: 67F/60F/61mph/0.09”

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WARNING NWS SWSThe High Wind Warning issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Oregon Coast remains in effect until 1:00pm this afternoon. On beaches and headlands, south winds 35-45 mph with gusts to 70 mph. In coastal communities, south winds 25-35 mph with gusts 50-60 mph. The strongest winds will be before 11:00am. The winds may be strong enough to damage trees and produce power disruptions. These winds could cause problems for outdoor events, especially those with temporary outdoor facilities such as tents and canopies. A High Wind Warning means a hazardous high wind event is expected or occurring. Sustained wind speeds of at least 40 mph or gusts of 58 mph or more can lead to property damage.

A Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for increasingly large seas today which may allow occasional waves to run higher up the beach than normal. Please avoid jetties, offshore rocks and beaches near the surf zone as larger than normal waves will be capable of knocking people off their feet and sweeping them away into the ocean.

Forecast: The storm should be all over but the shoutin’ by this afternoon as the breeze eases, showers fade and WON MIXEDsunbreaks appear. High about 60F today. By tonight, the sou’westers are expected to relax to 15-20 mph gusting 30 but showers remain likely; lows around 55F. Showers continue tomorrow morning followed by mixed skies after noon, light southerly winds and the mercury topping out at 60-65F. Outlook is for a chance of showers Monday through Wednesday, drying and clearing Thursday and Friday. Temperatures remain seasonal all week.

Surface Rescue

Call or email George today!

Travel: Oils that have built up on the pavement during our extensive period of dry weather this Summer will cause Northwest Oregon roads to become extra slippery during this weekend’s rain event. Be sure to slow down, use caution and leave extra space between you and the vehicle ahead of you.

In the Coast Range today, High Wind Warning in effect until noon for gusts to 60 mph, rain turning to showers with 65-70F. Valley destinations have a Wind Advisory through noon for gusts to 40 mph, rain, showers and a high of 75F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for showers, west winds gusting 25 mph, temps near 75F. For the Cascades, there’s wet pavement on the highways this morning, temperatures are 50-55F; rain, a chance of showers and thunderstorms, windy, the snow level is above 8,000 feet. Outlook for weekend travelers is sometimes wet and possibly slick roads through Sunday night.

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Marine: It’s rough this morning; winds are S 30-45 knots with seas 8 feet at 7 seconds. A Storm WON STORMWarning is in effect until noon today for S winds rising to 30-40 knots gusting 50 and combined seas building to 15 feet at 11 seconds. Southerlies easing to 25-30 knots gusting 35 this afternoon and tonight with combined seas 12-14 feet at 11 seconds. Tomorrow, SW winds falling to 15 knots, swells subsiding to 7 feet at 12 seconds. Outlook is for S winds 10-15 knots and swells 8-9 feet Monday through Wednesday. Always check the latest Bar Reports before you venture offshore.

On the Beach… Rain, extremely breezy, surf 15 feet (high).
* Stay off of jetties and offshore rocks, and be extremely watchful on rocky shores or sandy beaches. These areas may be periodically inundated by surf today, especially during high tides. Be aware of sneaker waves that will be significantly higher than those that precede or follow them. Never turn your back on the ocean.
* Tides
08/29 Sat 06:32 AM -1.30 L
08/29 Sat 01:02 PM 8.08 H
08/29 Sat 06:43 PM 0.81 L
08/30 Sun 12:55 AM 9.06 H

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In Short: Showery, very windy, then mixed skies and showers.

 Posted by at 7:28 AM

She’s cranking up the star-maker machinery again – Wehby for Governor?

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Aug 282015
 

Dr. Monica Wehby for Governor? Oregonian photo

Dr. Monica Wehby for Governor?
Oregonian photo


Losing to U.S. Senator Jeff Merkley by nearly 20 points and now using resigned-in-disgrace John Kitzhaber as a campaign punching bag, pediatric surgeon Monica Wehby is back in the hunt to win a government office. Not just any office. This time she wants to be governor.

Here’s the story in The Oregonian. Click here.

 Posted by at 11:11 PM

Strong El Nino set to create back to back dry winters – even on the coast

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Aug 282015
 
This El Nino much worse than the last big one in '97.

This El Nino much worse than the last big one in ’97.

NOAA and the National Weather Service are predicting another dry winter for central and eastern Oregon – a dry surge that will even leave the coast parched through the winter.

Here’s the story from the Oregonian. Click here.

 Posted by at 6:56 PM

High Winds/High Surf

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Aug 282015
 

WARNING NWS SWSA High Wind Warning has been issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Oregon Coast, in effect from 4:00am to 1:00pm Saturday. The High Wind Watch is no longer in effect. On beaches and headlands, south winds 30-40 mph with gusts to 65 mph. In coastal communities, south winds 25-35 mph with gusts 50-60 mph. The strongest winds will be between 6:00am and 11:00am. The winds may be strong enough to damage trees and produce power disruptions. These winds could cause problems for outdoor events, especially those with temporary outdoor facilities such as tents and canopies. A High Wind Warning means a hazardous high wind event is expected or occurring. Sustained wind speeds of at least 40 mph or gusts of 58 mph or more can lead to property damage.

A Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for increasingly large seas on Saturday which may allow occasional waves to run higher up the beach than normal. Please avoid jetties, offshore rocks and beaches near the surf zone on Saturday as larger than normal waves will be capable of knocking people off their feet and sweeping them away into the ocean.

 Posted by at 6:18 PM

6 year old Lincoln City child comes down with viral meningitis – believed to be only case in the county

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Aug 282015
 
Viral Meningitis is treated with fever reducers and lots of rest.

Viral Meningitis is treated with fever reducers and lots of rest.

Lincoln County Public Health confirms a viral meningitis case (the least serious of the meningitis variations) in 6-year-old. Officials believe the illness is a single case of viral meningitis.

Lincoln County Health and Human Services is confirming that a 6-year-old Lincoln City child has contracted viral meningitis, but officials don’t believe there are additional cases of viral meningitis in the community. The investigation includes interviews with parents, schools, local doctors and hospitals.

Meningitis refers to inflammation of the meninges, the lining around the brain and spinal cord. The inflammation can be caused by a number of things, including various bacteria, viruses and sometimes parasites.

Meningitis caused by viruses is more common than other types of meningitis, and is usually less severe than meningitis caused by bacteria. Many people are able to recover from viral meningitis on their own, without treatment.

Common symptoms in infants may include: fever, irritability, poor eating, sleepiness or trouble waking up from sleep, and a lack of energy. Common symptoms in adults: fever, headache, stiff neck, sensitivity to bright light, sleepiness or trouble waking up from sleep, nausea, vomiting, lack of appetite, and a lack of energy. Most people with viral meningitis usually get better on their own within 7 to 10 days.

Transmission of Viral Meningitis: If you have close contact with a person who has viral meningitis, you may become infected with the virus that made that person sick. However, you are not likely to develop meningitis as a complication of the illness.

The best way to protect yourself and others from viral infections is:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water, especially after changing diapers, using the toilet, or coughing or blowing your nose.
• Avoid touching your face with unwashed hands.
• Avoid close contact such as kissing, hugging, or sharing cups or eating utensils with people who are sick.
• Cover your coughs and sneezes with a tissue or your upper shirt sleeve, not your hands.
• Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces, such as toys and doorknobs, especially if someone is sick.
• Stay home when you are sick.

For more information click here.

 Posted by at 5:10 PM

GOOSENECK BARNACLES, NUDIBRANCHS, AND TUNICATES AT THE MARITIME CENTER!

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Aug 282015
 
Tide Pool Plants Bob's Creek Joanna Carrabbio

Tide Pool Plants
Bob’s Creek
Joanna Carrabbio

The Pacific Maritime Heritage Center will host the Oregon chapter of the Guild of Natural Science Illustrators’ exhibit, “Tidal Waters: The Art of Scientific Illustration.” This group exhibit, in the Center’s Galley Gallery, opens on Thursday, September 5, and will run through Sunday, February 21, 2016. The exhibit includes selected works submitted by members of the organization.

Science illustrators are artists in the service of science, and often accuracy takes precedence over aesthetics. However, those who view this exhibit will likely find it nothing short of artful.

This compilation of artwork follows in the long tradition of scientific illustration where attention to detail was paramount. Often times the Scientific Illustrator makes visible what cannot be otherwise seen. The subject matter included in this exhibit focuses on species associated with the tidal waters of Oregon. Subjects include anemones, crabs, sea stars, mussels, nudibranchs, chitons, tunicates, gooseneck barnacles and octopuses, among many others.

Artists include Catherine Alexander, Marly Beyer, Kristine Blodget, Rebecca Brown-Thompson, Joanna Carrabbio, Paula Fong, Alice Hill, Kristine Kirkeby, Cynthia Kranich, Terri Nelson and Nora Sherwood. All are Oregon residents, and each created pieces based on inspirations gained by visiting tide pools and areas around them. Media includes watercolor, acrylics, carbon dust, pen & ink and colored pencil. Most of the pieces are available for sale, with proceeds benefiting the Pacific Maritime Heritage Center.

The opening artists’ reception is set for Friday, September 11, from 5:00 to 7:00 pm at the Maritime Center. Admission to the opening reception is free for Historical Society members, and $5 for non-members. Continue reading »

 Posted by at 4:19 PM

Newport: Messy accident at Highway 20 and Fogarty

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Aug 282015
 

newport police logo badge

Little after 3pm

Two Honda cars collided at Highway 20 and Fogarty a little after 3pm. One driver is said to be not only intoxicated but uninsured. Police are on scene to take care of that part of it – the fire department is cleaning up a lot of spilled auto fluids on the roadway surface.

 Posted by at 3:40 PM

Weather or Not: High Wind Watch/Gale Warning

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Aug 282015
 

Chris Burns Weather

Friday, August 28th – Lincoln County

Summary: We’re already off to a roaring start with precipitation, even though the predicted heavy rain is still about 12 hours out. Showers arrived on the Central Coast overnight leaving from a tenth to a third of an inch in the rain gauges. Of course, that was on the heels of very nice Summer weather yesterday, including sunshine, highs about 70F and light winds. The transformation began around sunset as clouds moved in and there was already some light rain being reported before midnight. The heaviest shower passed through at 1:30am this morning. Drizzle was in the air at dawn, and it was dead calm.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Rain…
Lincoln City: 73F/57F/0.37”
Depoe Bay: 69F/55F/0.27”
Newport: 70F/52F/0.22”
Waldport: 67F/53F/0.10”
Yachats: 67F/56F/0.09”

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WARNING NWS SWSA High Wind Watch has been issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Coast, in effect from late tonight through tomorrow morning. An unusually strong late August storm system is becoming increasingly likely to move northward along the coast producing south winds 25-35 mph with gusts to 65. The winds may be strong enough to damage trees and produce power disruptions. A High Wind Watch means there is the potential for a hazardous high wind event. Sustained winds of at least 40 mph or gusts of 58 mph or stronger may occur. Continue to monitor the latest forecasts.

The Special Weather Statement is also still in effect for the most rain we’ve seen since March. Rainfall accumulations through the weekend will probably range from 1-2 inches along the Central Coast and Coast Range to 0.75 to 1.5 inches in the Cascades and 0.5 inches or higher in the valleys. The heaviest rain will be tonight into tomorrow, but a second system will add to the rainfall totals Saturday night into early Sunday. If all of this unfolds as expected, the rain will likely ease the dry fire conditions dramatically over Northwest Oregon for at least the next week or two. The rain and wind will also cause problems for those with outdoor activities planned for this weekend. Snow levels will generally stay above 8,000 feet, but climbing area mountains is not recommended.

Forecast: Light rain is possible until about noon today before we transition to a chance of showers for the afternoon. The mercury tops out in the low-60s and winds are expected to be light. The storm is on track to come ashore tonight with WON SHOWERSincreasing winds and rain, up to a half inch. Tomorrow is going to be the big wind day as southerlies howl at 25-30 mph gusting 50-60, and another half inch or better of precipitation falls. Outlook is for a 50-50 chance of showers Sunday, then slowly decreasing shower probabilities Monday through Wednesday, and back to Summer with mostly sunny skies on Thursday. Seasonal temps range from 50-65F all week.

Surface Rescue

Call or email George today!

Travel: Oils that have built up on the pavement during our extensive period of dry weather this Summer will cause Northwest Oregon roads to become extra slippery during the first part of the coming rain event. Be sure to slow down, use caution and leave extra space between you and the vehicle ahead of you.

In the Coast Range today, rain turning to showers with 70-75F. Valley destinations are expecting rain, showers and a high of 80F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for showers, light west winds, temps near 80F. For the Cascades, there’s bare pavement on the highways this morning, temperatures are 55-60F; a slight chance of showers, the snow level is above 8,000 feet. Outlook for weekend travelers is wet and possibly slick roads through Sunday night.

Despite the forecast, outdoor burning remains banned in most of Northwest Oregon including State Parks and ocean beaches.

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Marine: Conditions remain light this morning with S winds 10 knots and seas 4 feet at 15 seconds. But, it’s gonna WON GALEchange quickly by tonight when a Gale Warning goes into effect. For today, southerlies 10-15 knots with swells holding at 4 feet. Tonight, S winds rising to 25-30 knots and windwaves building to 5-7 feet. The biggest blow is expected tomorrow as southerly winds increase to 30-35 knots gusting 45 with very rough combined seas 10-15 feet at 10 seconds. Outlook is for sou’westers 15-20 knots Sunday through Tuesday, swells staying up around 8-9 feet. Always check the latest Bar Reports before you venture offshore.

On the Beach… Showers, light breeze, surf 3 feet (low).
* Strong winds with surf building to high levels Saturday and Sunday.
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
08/28 Fri 05:48 AM -1.10 L
08/28 Fri 12:21 PM 7.50 H
08/28 Fri 05:53 PM 1.50 H
08/29 Sat 00:04 AM 8.90 H

www.airrowheating.com/

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In Short: Showers, light wind, then rainy and very windy.

 Posted by at 8:00 AM