Annual Lincoln City Rummage Sale for the LCCC!!

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Jan 112019
 

Big Rummage Sale fundraiser at LCCC
Lincoln City


LINCOLN CITY – Are you experiencing “The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up,” in the style of Mari Kondo and the KoMari Method? Or perhaps you’ve decided to try “The Gentle Swedish Art of Death Cleaning” by Margareta Magnusson? Whatever your method, the Lincoln City Cultural Center can help.

This week, the nonprofit center’s volunteers are accepting the things that are failing to spark your joy: good, clean, pre-loved items for the LCCC’s 9th annual Winter Rummage Sale. Donations will be accepted from noon to 4 pm Monday-Thursday, Jan. 14-17, at the east entrance of the LCCC, 540 NE Hwy. 101 in Lincoln City. The sale will be held from 9 am to 3 pm on Friday, Jan. 18, and Saturday, Jan. 19, at the same location.

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“We’ll take your used items – clean and in good repair – and turn them into concerts, art shows, workshops and children’s programs,” said LCCC executive director Niki Price. “Some of us may be using the Komari method, but there are others who are looking for a jacket, a good book or a lovely piece of art, or a basket to hold your shoes at the door. And our Winter Rummage Sale can help all those folks. Got a box full of books about household organization, and a whole bunch of plastic bins you thought might help but never did? Bring them over! We need donations of great stuff, and a lot of shoppers, too.”

All proceeds from this annual event will fund the operations of the Cultural Center, funding concerts, exhibits, classes, children’s programs and much more. The LCCC was the venue for nearly 400 programs in 2018, its busiest year on record, and the arts and culture will keep on coming through 2019. Bringing in an annual windfall of around $5000, the Winter Rummage Sale is one of the biggest fundraisers of the year.

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The effort is led by volunteer Clarissa Gillis, aka “The Queen of the Masking Tape and Markers.” She’s ready to price your donations of housewares, small appliances, light furniture, electronics, bed and bath items, books, DVDs, CDs, children’s toys, boxed games and puzzles (with all the pieces), knick-knacks and clean clothing in good repair. The sale committee also needs clean plastic bags, for use in the sale, and plenty of volunteers to sort, lift, cashier, bag and clean.

“I’m so excited to see what treasures await my magic marker. You know I love to do this. I believe so much in the cultural center and what it represents in our community,” Gillis said.

Donations will be accepted from noon to 4 pm Monday-Thursday, Jan. 14-17. Limited pickups may be available in the north Lincoln County area. To schedule, call the LCCC at 541-994-9994 or Clarissa Gillis at 541-764-2260.

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The sale will be open from 9 am to 3 pm on Friday and Saturday, Jan. 18 and 19. Cash, checks and credit cards will be accepted. Lunch will be served both days.
For more information, call the LCCC at 541-994-9994.

Fatal head on crash on 101 south of Seal Rock

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Jan 112019
 

Fatal head on crash on Hwy 101 just south of Seal Rock at Marsh Road. One fatality. Two seriously injured.

On Thursday evening at about 8:45 pm, Oregon State Police (OSP) Troopers and emergency personnel responded to a report of a two vehicle fatal head-on crash on US Hwy 101 near milepost 152, just south of Seal Rock.

Troopers say a blue 2001 Lexus SUV, operated by Patricia Norenberg, age 55, of Waldport, was driving southbound on US Hwy 101 when she drifted into the northbound lane of travel. A northbound gold 2008 Toyota van driven by Richard Larrett, age 85, of Lincoln City, and the two vehicles collided partially head-on. Larrett’s passenger, Judith Larrett, age 81, of Lincoln City, was pronounced deceased at the scene.

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Norenberg and Richard Larrett were transported by ambulance to Newport’s Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital due to their injuries.

Highway 101 was closed about just over 3 hours following the crash however, a detour had been established to help traffic.

No word yet on why Patricia Norenberg’s vehicle drifted across the center line, causing the fatal crash.

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Weather or Not: Nice!

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Jan 112019
 

1/11/19 Mixed skies today-tonight, E winds 5-10mph, high 55F, low 45F, mostly sunny tomorrow, a SE breeze 10-15mph, high 55F. Outlook: sunny Sun-Mon, then mainly overcast and a chance of some light rain developing Tue-Thu, average temperatures with highs in the low-50s, lows 40-45F.

Beaches Today:
Surf Height…………..10 to 14 ft.
Weather………………Mostly cloudy. Highs around 55.
Wind…………………Southeast 5 to 10 mph with gusts to 20 mph.
Tides (South Beach)…
High tide…7.6 ft at 03:54 AM PST.
Low tide….3.7 ft at 09:28 AM PST.
High tide…7.2 ft at 03:08 PM PST.
Low tide….1.1 ft at 09:39 PM PST.
Sunrise – 7:53 AM PST. Sunset – 4:56 PM PST.

Weekend Travel: Mostly dry pavement in the Valley, Gorge and Coast Range, but there’s a chance for some frosty spots tomorrow night; in the Cascades, the highway passes should be mainly clear through Sunday night with the free air freezing level 7,000′-8,000′.

Good News for Newport’s Warming Shelters for the Homeless!

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Jan 102019
 

From Newport Warming Shelter Director Traci Flowers

We received great news today!!! The Lincoln County Hazardous Weather Shelter
has just changed to the Newport Winter Shelter. We will be opening Sunday through Thursday no matter what the weather from January 13th through March 15th… at the fairgrounds!!!

With this change we will need lots more volunteer help at both Grace Wins and the Winter Shelter at the fairgrounds. Food donations are needed for meals for the night shelter as well as for individual lunch items for Grace Wins Haven.

Click Here for Details

Also, we need people almost around the clock so even if they can just give an hour we can use them!! There are many opportunities to serve from helping provide a meal to helping someone write a resume. Volunteers can even help sort donations or wash bedding. Many hands make light work!

If you can help out – even for just an hour, call Grace Wins Haven at 541-234-4639 and talk to Traci.

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Oregonian writer Lori Tobias memorializes the crew of the Mary B II

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Jan 102019
 

Wreckage of the Mary B II
Just north of Newport’s north jetty
Greg Henton photo


Veteran newswriter Lori Tobias wrote a compelling story in The Oregonian of this week’s horrific tragedy in the making – the last moments of life for three crab boat fishermen who perished Tuesday evening near the mouth of the Newport jaws.

The rough seas slammed and tossed the Mary B II and its crew – two of whom were thrown to their deaths into the roiling sea – the third crewman dying inside the battered vessel.

Here’s Lori’s report in The Oregonian. Click here.

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BAD Head-On Crash on 101, south of Seal Rock

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Jan 102019
 

8:49pm
A bad head-on crash has obliterated two vehicles, blocking Highway 101 at Marsh Street – about a third of the way from Seal Rock to Waldport. Very serious injuries. Fire-Rescue personnel are on scene and are calling for numerous ambulances. At least one person is trapped in a vehicle.

9:00pm
Life Flight air ambulance is enroute to the scene. But their flight time to the scene is the better part of an hour since they’re flying in from Portland.

9:01pm
Rescue personnel says Life Flight should land at the Newport Airport where they’ll meet up with ambulances administering trauma treatment.

9:03pm
Rescue personnel say they can handle the situation with just two ambulances on scene. The third inbound ambulance can cancel and return to quarters.

9:08pm
Highway 101 completely blocked. OSP will try to figure out work-around detours.

9:09pm
First ambulance northbound to PCH hospital in Newport. Life Flight is inbound from the Portland metro enroute to Newport Airport to airlift the most seriously injured to a trauma center, likely in Corvallis.

10:03pm
Life Flight is landing at Newport Airport. Seriously injured patients are at PCH. No word if both will go by Life Flight, or if one will go ground ambulance to Corvallis Trauma Center.

10:04pm
Fire-Rescue says hospital to contact Life Flight dispatch to determine whether Life Flight will be transporting anyone to the valley.

MidCoast Watershed Council New Hire

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Jan 102019
 

Ari Blatt
Restoration Program Assistant for MidCoast Watershed Council

Hello, I’m Ari Blatt, the new Restoration Program Assistant position with the MidCoast Watersheds Council.

Californian-born but Corvallis-raised since age 3, I count myself lucky for growing up with access to the forests, mountains, and waters that make Oregon so enchanting to transplants and natives alike. From this place grew a desire to gain a deeper ecological knowledge of the world around me.

With this in mind, I obtained my BS in Environmental Science from Western Washington University in Bellingham, WA in 2016. Being situated on the shores of the Salish Sea, I focused my studies on salmon and their environment, and received an emphasis in marine ecology, along with a minor in American Indian Studies. I stayed in Bellingham for a year after college to work with the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association, a non-profit similar to MCWC in their goals to recover salmon populations through restoration actions and community outreach.

Upon return to Oregon, I spent several seasons with the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife sampling recreational fisheries and conducting salmon spawning grounds surveys. At the same time, I worked as a writer at the independent newsweekly the Corvallis Advocate, writing stories within the intersection of environmental science and society. I am excited by the opportunity to combine my love of salmon, restoration, and writing into a single position in my favorite spot on the coast.

In my free time, I am thrilled to surf, ski, cook and read. I am very much looking forward to getting to know members of this community, say hi when you can!

Ari Blatt
ari@midcoastwc.org

Looks like freeway toll-booths on I-5 and I-205 in Portland’s future

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Jan 102019
 

Freeway toll booths coming to Portland?
Oregonian photo


With less and less federal funds going in to local infrastructure, from schools to fire stations and from freeways to bridges, the long-dreaded “toll-booth” solution appears to be rising up from the black lagoon.

Here’s the story from The Oregonian. Click here.

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LC Schools Superintendent Dr. Karen Gray wants you to know….

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Jan 102019
 

Community Learning and Sharing: Conversations with Dr. Karen Gray
Tuesday, January 29⋅6:00 – 7:30 pm
Sam Case Elementary
459 NE 12th St, Newport, OR 97365

Description: These are sessions with Dr. Karen Gray, new Superintendent of Lincoln County School District, on a topic of learning in our schools. This first session is on Restorative Justice is a way of managing social expectations in a restorative rather than punitive manner. Come learn more about what it is and how it relates to our teaching.

All are welcome! Pizza will be served. This is a family-friendly event but will be more for adults with children in our schools. Childcare provided.

Click here for details

Community Learning and Sharing: Conversations with Dr. Karen Gray
Wednesday, February 6⋅6:00 – 7:30 pm
Taft Elementary School
SE High School Dr, Lincoln City, OR 97367

Description: These are sessions with Dr. Karen Gray, new Superintendent of Lincoln County School District, on a topic of learning in our schools. This first session is on Restorative Justice. Restorative Justice is a way of managing social expectations in a restorative rather than punitive manner. Come to learn more about what it is and how it relates to our teaching.

All are welcome! Pizza will be served. This is a family-friendly event but will be more for adults with children in our schools. Childcare provided.

Click here for details

Learn all about Orcas (aka Killer Whales)

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Jan 102019
 

Mid-Coast Watershed Council meeting coming up…

Killer whales, also known as orcas, are perhaps the most widely recognized type of whale in the world. With their distinctive black-and-white coloring, tall dorsal fins, and reputation as top predators, most people know what an orca is and how they live – or do we? There is a lot more happening beneath the waves than first meets the eye. The MidCoast Watersheds Council invites the public to attend a presentation by Colleen Weiler on Orcas of the Oregon Coast and their connection to our watersheds on January 10th, 2019 at 6:30 PM in Newport. The meeting will be held in room 205 (upstairs) at the Newport Visual Arts Center at Nye Beach, 777 NW Beach Dr., Refreshments will be served.

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Orcas aren’t just the “wolves of the sea,” they live in incredibly close family groups, have lifespans similar to ours, and are one of the best examples of culture in non-human society. The critically endangered Southern Resident orca community, a unique population that lives off the west coast of the U.S. and Canada, faces threats from fundamental changes to their ecosystem, most vitally the decline of salmon throughout the Pacific Northwest and Canada. How are these orcas connected to Oregon, and why are healthy rivers and watersheds essential for their continued survival?

A MidCoast Watersheds Council Board meeting will follow the presentation and refreshment break. Agenda: Financial report, Restoration Report, Technical Team report, Administrative Team report and action items.

Join us to learn more about how Oregonians can help save one of the most endangered whale populations in the world. We hope to see you on Thursday, January 10th at 6:30 at the Newport VAC.

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Oregon Snowpack (summer water) Outlook a little iffy…

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Jan 102019
 

ODOT photo

Midwinter storms brought significant snowfall and most of eastern Oregon’s mountains have near normal snowpack. Central and western parts of the state remain below normal. This is according to the January Water Supply Outlook Report released today by the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Snowpack in the Owyhee basin in eastern Oregon sits at 109 percent of normal, the most in the state. Western Oregon snowpack is about 65 percent of normal overall.

“The long-range weather forecast does not favor significant snowpack recovery in the coming months, but at this early date in the snow season, there is plenty of opportunity for the outlook to change,” said Scott Oviatt, Snow Survey supervisory hydrologist. “Last year at this time, all basins in the state had less than 60 percent of normal snowpack.”

Although most of the state has received less than 90 percent of average precipitation since the water year began on Oct. 1, much of the state’s December precipitation coincided with colder temperatures and fell as snow. This helped some areas reach normal snowpack levels by Jan. 1.

Combined water reservoir storage in most basins is between 60 and 80 percent of average as of the end of December. A hot, dry summer and high irrigation demand followed by a drier than usual autumn has led to lower than average carryover storage. The remaining winter months are critical for determining if reservoir storage levels will recover to normal levels in time for summer irrigation season.

Weather or Not: Dry for a Few Days

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Jan 102019
 

1/10/19 Partial clearing today-tomorrow, light S winds becoming SE 10-15mph, highs 55F, low 45-50F. Outlook: partly to mostly sunny Sat-Mon, chance of showers developing Tue-Wed, then wet for a while. The thermometer should remain around seasonal with highs of 50-55F and lows 40-45F.

Beaches Today:
Surf Height…………..11 to 15 ft.
Weather………………Mostly cloudy with a slight chance of showers. Highs around 55.
Wind…………………Southeast 15 to 20 mph with gusts to 30 mph.
Tides (South Beach)…
High tide…7.6 ft at 03:18 AM PST.
Low tide….3.8 ft at 08:40 AM PST.
High tide…7.8 ft at 02:25 PM PST.
Low tide….0.6 ft at 09:03 PM PST.
Sunrise – 7:53 AM PST. Sunset – 4:55 PM PST.

Yachats Lions Club Annual Crab Feed – January 26

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Jan 102019
 


Yachats Lions Club  

Annual Crab Feed is Jan. 26
 
The Yachats Lions Club annual Crab Feed will feature “all the crab you can eat” on Saturday, Jan. 26. The trek to Yachats to eat Dungeness crab is a tradition for many families and groups. For many years, the Yachats Lions have served more than 1,500 pounds of fresh crab to an average of 500 people at afternoon seatings at the Yachats Commons and the Yachats Lions Hall. The Commons is located at 441 Highway 101 N, and the Lions Hall is one block west of there at 344 Fourth St.

The $40 per person tickets may be purchased locally, or they may be ordered by mail, email, or phone, indicating time and venue. To order by mail, send to Yachats Lions Crab Feed, P.O. Box 66, Yachats, OR 97498; by email, send to lionscrabfeed2019@gmail.com; by phone, call Kevin or Peggy, 541-563-5629. Locally, people may purchase tickets at Judith’s Kitchen Tools or the Lions Thrift Store in downtown Yachats.

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Seating is available at the Yachats Commons on Jan. 26 at 12:30 p.m. and 4:00 p.m. (reserved seating only – groups of 6 or more), and at the Yachats Lions Hall at 4 p.m. The 12:30 p.m. seating is for anyone who may wish to eat early and does not have reserved seating. The 4 p.m. seating at the Lions Hall is open to first come, first served cafeteria style seating. Some people prefer the Lions Hall venue, as they get a chance to meet new people there.

Debra Novgrod, coordinator of this year’s crab feed, said, “We get great support from the community and local businesses in Yachats, Waldport and Newport. South Beach Fish Market cooks and cleans the best tasting local crab you’ll ever eat.” Novgrod added, “In addition to all the crab you can eat (until the food is gone), the menu includes coleslaw, French bread, baked beans, coffee, soda, and great fun.”

All proceeds from the Crab Feed support the Lions Club’s community service projects, such as scholarships to graduating seniors, food pantries, the pre-school and after-school programs of the Yachats Youth and Family Activities Program, South Lincoln County Resources programs, and eyeglasses for children and adults.

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Upholding the motto, “We Serve,” the Yachats Lions Club is celebrating over 68 years of service to Yachats and south Lincoln County. The Yachats Lions Thrift Store, located across Fourth Street from the Yachats Commons, has served our community for more than 40 years.

Lions Clubs International is the world’s largest service club organization, with 100+ years of serving humanity, over 1.4 million men and women, in 47 thousand clubs in 200+ countries and regions.

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Saving Winter Steelhead runs means fewer sea lions getting access to them.

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Jan 092019
 

Winter Steelhead runs are heading toward extinction if Sea Lions aren’t curtailed – ODFW

Winter Steelhead fish are about to pass into extinction according to Oregon Fish and Wildlife officials. They say the only way to save them is to start killing what’s killing the Steelhead – Sea Lions.

Here’s the story as told by Oregon Public Broadcasting. Click here.

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