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The Corona Virus shows no signs of backing off…

Corona Virus Update

On Thursday, more than 4,000 people died of covid-19 in the United States, the first time the toll has exceeded that milestone, following a record day Wednesday of 3,915 deaths. The pandemic has now claimed more than 363,000 lives in the United States. More than 265,000 new coronavirus cases were reported, the second-highest count in a day according to a Washington Post analysis. More than 132,000 people are battling covid-19 in hospital beds, the most the nation’s health-care system has taken on.

Covid-19 Virus Vaccine ready for eligible Phase 1 agencies…

Lincoln County Public Health and County Emergency Management are in the process of contacting eligible Phase 1a agencies to receive their COVID-19 vaccine.

However, due to the extensive listing of the eligible agencies in Phase 1A, County Public Health is canvasing the entire county to make sure that they are aware of the vaccine distribution process and the steps they need to take to participate.

If you or your agency meet the following criteria for Phase 1A and have NOT been contacted by Lincoln County Public Health or County Emergency Management, then you are encouraged to complete the on-line Lincoln County vaccine needs assessment survey as soon as possible.

Eligible groups in Phase 1A can be found in detail in the “Phase 1a Vaccine Sequencing Plan” document located here https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le3527.pdf

Phase 1a groups include the following:

  • Hospitals and Urgent Care Clinics
  • Long-term Care facilities
  • Emergency Medical Services Providers and other first responders
  • Hospice programs
  • Mobile Crisis Care and related services
  • Secure transport
  • Corrections facilities
  • Outpatient medical care services
  • Integrative Health Services (massage, acupuncture, chiropractic, etc.)
  • In-Home care services (agency and independent licensed workers)
  • Day Treatment services
  • Non-emergency medical transport
  • Public Health
  • Death care workers
  • Medical Clinics – Dental, Vision, General Practice Providers
  • Educational Facilities (teachers, support staff, and daycare) have since been added to Phase 1A

The survey can be accessed here:
https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/ecedca1cc0cd4314a0e911dd32305a99

When the county is ready to move to Phase 1B, notices will be posted on our website, social media, and we will notify local community groups, healthcare providers and media outlets.  Phase 1B will include people age 75 and older and frontline essential workers, with more detail being developed by the State Vaccine Advisory Group now.

If agencies have any questions, please email or call (541) 265-0621 Option #0, LincolnCoCallCenter@co.lincoln.or.us

Yachats Lions Crab Feed January 30th – Take out meals only…

For over 20 years the Yachats Lions Club has held an “all the crab you can eat” even in Yachats. The annual trek to Yachats to eat Dungeness Crab is a tradition for families and groups from across Oregon and Washington.

This years’ crab feed will be a little different due to covid-19.   We will be selling crab meals available for take-out only. It will consist of one whole local crab, cole slaw,  and homemade bread.  Meals will be available for pick-up (scheduled times) at the Lions Hall, 344 4th Street, Yachats.

The $25 per person tickets are available for sale online at
https://yachatslionsclub.org/ You can select your pickup time and order as many meals as you like. Email for more information at Lionscrabfeed2021@gmail.com.

Kevin Yorks, coordinator of the popular crab feed this year says, “We get great support from the community and local businesses in Yachats, Waldport and Newport. South Beach Fish Market cooks and cleans the best tasting local crab you ever ate.”

All proceeds from the annual crab feed fundraiser supports Lions Community Service projects with scholarships to graduating seniors, food pantries, the Preschool and after school programs of the Yachats Youth and Family program, South Lincoln Resources programs, eyeglasses for children and adults.

With the motto “WE SERVE,” Yachats Lions Club is celebrating 71 years of service to Yachats
and South Lincoln County. The Yachats Lions Thrift Store across 4th Street from the
Yachats Commons, has served our community for more than 40 years.

Lions Clubs International is the world’s largest service club organization, with a
network of 1.3 million men and women in more than 200 countries and
geographical locations. We serve where we live, as well as globally, and we have fun
doing it.

Corona Virus Update – January 7th

Coronavirus Update nameplate

Jan. 7, 2021

#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Should people who have recovered from COVID-19 get vaccinated?

We’ve received questions from people who have had COVID-19 and recovered, wondering whether they should still get the vaccine. 

Unfortunately, re-infection is possible with COVID-19. Therefore, even if you have already had the virus and recovered, you may still be advised to get a COVID-19 vaccine. According to the CDC, COVID-19 vaccination should be offered to persons regardless of a history of COVID-19 infection, with or without symptoms. They don’t recommend testing to check for prior infection when deciding to get the vaccine. Natural immunity, which is gained from having the infection, varies from person to person. It is still unknown how long natural immunity lasts, though some evidence already indicates that it is not for an extensive period of time.  

To learn more about the COVID-19 vaccines, visit OHA’s COVID-19 webpage (English and Spanish). 

Due to the severe health risks from COVID-19 and the fact that reinfection is still possible, you mays still be advised to get the vaccine. #MyORHealth horizontal rule

The hazards of the home office

Last spring, lots of office workers packed up what we could from our cubes and set up shop at home. Many of us have been making use of armchairs, couches and  beds to support our new work-from-home lifestyle.   

According toSAIF, no matter how comfortable these solutions might seem, these “non-office environments” have the potential to put stress on various parts of the body, which can lead to discomfort, fatigue and soreness. To help keep these ergonomic issues at bay, SAIF shared these recommendations to keep your computer workstation hazard-free:   

  • Assume a relaxed, tension-free posture in your neck and shoulders.  
  • Place your elbows at a 90-degree angle.  
  • Keep your wrists protected from sharp or hard edges, and in a neutral position.  
  • Make sure the mouse is at the same height and distance from the screen as the keyboard.  
  • Ensure adequate lower back support.  
  • Keep your knees at a 90-degree angle.   
  • Keep your hips at a 90-degree angle.   
  • Position your feet flat on the floor or supported by a footrest.   
  • Make sure the height of your work surface is appropriate.   
  • Sit at the correct distance from the monitor: about 25”.   
  • Keep computer monitor at, or slightly below, eye level.  

To learn more about how to get the most out of your office setup, how to maintain perfect posture and what office stretches you can incorporate into your daily routine to prevent fatigue, visit SAIF’s full page of home office resourceshere. 

Back view of person working at tall desk. Computer monitor, cat, tea, plant and light are on desk and bulletin board on wall#MyORHealth horizontal rule

Facebook Live on questions about COVID-19 data

We know a lot you are interested in Oregon’s COVID-19 data On Wednesday, Jan. 6, we held a Facebook Live Q&A on COVID-19 data. The recording is available in English or Spanish. Here are time stamps for the questions: 

7:44 – Why don’t you report data on how many people have recovered from COVID-19? 

9:06 – Why aren’t we seeing data being reported for flu? 

9:37 – Why do you focus on cumulative cases instead of active cases? 

10:41 – Why not open gyms? What data supports keeping gyms closed? 

12:49 – Why don’t we know where the sporadic cases are coming from? Are they really untraceable? 

13:56 – Do you release the results of contact tracing? 

15:43 – I heard that data is behind a week. Is that true? 

17:15 – Is Oregon testing for SARS-CoV-2 variants like those found in the United Kingdom or South Africa? If so, have those variants been seen in Oregon? 

18:53 – What are the most effective counties in Oregon, and where can I find that information in Spanish? 

19:48 – Are positive tests for one individual reported multiple times? 

21:40 – Is there a data page on the OHA site that shows how far away any given county is to meeting the criteria for the next level of allowable commerce? 

24:50 – Why does the map of cases by zip code omit Warm Springs? 

25:34 – Do you have any data on the false positive rate for the PCR testing done in the state? 

#MyORHealth horizontal ruleArrows indicate increase in cases and deaths, decrease in hospitalizations

Oregon reports 867 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 10 new deaths

COVID-19 has claimed 10 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,568, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 867 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 121,085. 

Today’s case count is lower than anticipated because of technical issues. 

Vaccinations in Oregon: Today, OHA recorded 5,249 doses of vaccine administered — including 995 second doses — raising the state’s total number of doses administered to 66,920. This figure is based on preliminary reports of 3,429 doses administered yesterday, as well as 1,820 doses administered on prior days that had not been recorded. OHA’s daily media updates provide information that is preliminary and subject to change. The OHA’s dashboards provide more updated vaccination data. 

All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs). 

To date, 250,100 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon. 

COVID-19 hospitalizationsThe number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 462, which is 18 fewer than yesterday. There are 91 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is 29 fewer than yesterday. The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity. More information about hospital capacity can be found here. 

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (30), Clackamas (44), Clatsop (1), Columbia (1), Coos (7), Crook (15), Curry (1), Deschutes (44), Douglas (14), Grant (3), Harney (3), Hood River (10), Jackson (71), Jefferson (20), Josephine (5), Klamath (3), Lake (10), Lane (76), Lincoln (7), Linn (33), Malheur (17), Marion (134), Morrow (3), Multnomah (17), Polk (27), Sherman (10), Tillamook (7), Umatilla (159), Union (14), Wallowa (2), Wasco (9), Washington (33) and Yamhill (34). 

Here is more information on the deaths reported today:     

Oregon’s 1,559th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 3 and died on Jan. 3 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,560th COVID-19 death is a 74-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 2 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed. 

Oregon’s 1,561st COVID-19 death is an 85-year-old woman in Tillamook County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Jan. 5 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,562nd COVID-19 death is a 56-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 2 at his residence. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,563rd COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 14 and died on Dec. 20 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,564th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 1 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,565th COVID-19 death is a 72-year-old woman in Yamhill County who tested positive on Dec. 4 and died on Dec. 24 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,566th COVID-19 death is a 73-year-old man in Linn County who tested positive on Dec. 31 and died on Dec. 31; location of death is being confirmed. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,567th COVID-19 death is an 88-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Dec. 3 and died on Jan. 5 at Asante Three Rivers Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed. 

Oregon’s 1,568th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old man in Josephine County who tested positive on Dec. 15 and died on Dec. 26 at his residence. He had underlying conditions. 

Note: Updated information is available for Oregon’s 1,281st death, reported on Dec. 17, 2020. She is a 78-year-old woman in Clackamas County. She was originally reported as a Washington County resident. 

Lining up for vaccinations…details, details, details…

COVID-19 Vaccine Advisory Committee meets to discuss vaccine priorities

PORTLAND, Ore. — Oregon’s COVID-19 Vaccine Advisory Committee (VAC) met for the first time today to discuss how critical workers and populations will be prioritized in the state’s vaccine rollout.

The VAC will co-create a vaccine sequencing plan focused on health equity to ensure the state’s vaccine distribution plan meets the needs of populations who are most at-risk and hardest hit by the pandemic. These populations include communities of color, tribal communities and people with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Educators and other staff at PK-12 schools and early learning centers will follow the Phase 1A group, which includes: health care workers, residents and staff at long-term care facilities and first responders, in the state’s most immediate prioritization order. The vaccine advisory committee is considering how to prioritize critical workers, such as transportation workers and grocery store workers, older adults, people with underlying conditions and other factors.

“Urgency,” said Cherity Bloom-Miller, VAC member with the Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians Community Health Clinic. “We need to make some fast decisions to get vaccines out quickly.”

Oregon Health Authority Director Patrick Allen, who joined the group’s first meeting, shared the same sentiment. “The decisions you’re going to make will be incredibly hard and we’re asking you to make them incredibly quickly,” said Allen.

Today’s meeting was a vital first step in determining upcoming sequencing. The inaugural meeting of the diverse, 27-member group representing health organizations, nonprofits and businesses across rural and urban Oregon – including older adults, people with disabilities, cultural and ethnic communities, migrant and seasonal farm workers – came a day after the deadliest day of COVID-19 in the United States to date. The pandemic has now claimed more than 360,000 lives.

Recommendations for a vaccine sequencing plan are expected to develop over the next several weeks. For a YouTube link of today’s meeting, click here. The next VAC meeting will be streaming live on Thursday, Jan. 14 from 10 a.m. to noon.

For more on the COVID-19 Vaccine Advisory Committee (VAC), including a list of Advisory Committee Membership, click here.

Vaccinations in Oregon

OHA is  providing daily updates on administered doses of COVID-19 vaccines in Oregon on its vaccination data dashboard

The dashboard provides weekday updates on the number of people vaccinated, both by state and by county, along with key demographic information showing the race, ethnicity, sex and age of everyone who has been vaccinated.

MASTT – Survivors in Hotels and Temporary Housing – still trying to cope with their loss

MASTT is here to empower wildfire survivors still living in hotels and other forms of temporary housing to take the next step in their recovery.

(Contact: Shelby Houston & Celia August: 541-265-0621 – firerecovery@co.lincoln.or.us)

Online: https://www.co.lincoln.or.us/emergencymanagement/page/mastt-lincoln-county

  • Each household will be guided to share their story in a trauma-informed interview format.
  • Participation in the interview puts survivor households on the “radar” for disaster case managers who are currently being hired to help in the next phase of the recovery effort.
  • The purpose of the interview is also to identify barriers to permanent housing and identify resources/programs that can be accessed to help overcome these barriers.
  • Each survivor household will take away from these interviews an actionable plan which includes steps they can take to support their progress towards their recovery.
  • Interviews will be done virtually, either through a video meeting or a conference call with the MASTT.

This process will take several months to get through all of the survivor households. We will be actively reaching out to those households we have identified as still in need of permanent housing and we also welcome households to email us their current contact information, household composition/pets, their current living status, and their pre-disaster living status.

Crime marches on…especially when millions of dollars are involved…

Two Oregon men are facing federal charges that they illegally channeled federal loans to their own private bank accounts…loans that were intended to help small businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic, this according to U.S. Attorney Billy J. Williams.

Andrew Aaron Lloyd, 50, of Lebanon and Russell A. Schort, 38, of Myrtle Creek, Oregon, have been charged by criminal complaint with wire fraud, bank fraud, and money laundering.

Lloyd and Schort took advantage of economic relief programs administered by the Federal Government’s Small Business Administration (SBA), including Economic Injury Disaster Loans (EIDLs) and the Paycheck Protection Program (PPP), as authorized by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. The CARES Act is designed to provide emergency financial assistance to millions of Americans and small businesses suffering the economic effects of the COVID-19 pandemic.

According to the complaint, the FBI began investigating Lloyd and Schort after discovering suspicious financial transactions indicating that the pair may have fraudulently obtained PPP loans. A review of bank records revealed that between April 7, 2020 and May 8, 2020, Lloyd and Schort applied for and received at least three PPP loan payments using three separate business entities, totaling more than $2.2 million. The loan application packages included some of the same information across the different business entities, including the businesses’ physical locations and the names of several dozen employees.

After receiving the funds, Lloyd transferred at least $1.8 million to a personal online brokerage account and purchased various securities. In the months that followed, these investments substantially increased in value. On the date of the seizure, the securities purchased with the fraud proceeds and with a loan secured by equities purchased with fraud proceeds, were valued at over $10 million.

Schort was arrested on January 6th by FBI agents and made his initial appearance in federal court the same day.  Lloyd was arrested Thursday, January 7th, by FBI agents and will make his initial appearance Friday, January 8th before a U.S. Magistrate Judge in Eugene.

The case was investigated by the FBI with assistance from the Small Business Association and IRS.

Anyone with information about allegations of attempted fraud involving COVID-19 funds can call the Department of Justice’s National Center for Disaster Fraud (NCDF) Hotline at 866-720-5721 or by using the NCDF Web Complaint Form at: https://www.justice.gov/disaster-fraud/ncdf-disaster-complaint-form.

Scammers Pretending to be the Internal Revenue Service

SCAMMERS POSING AS THE Internal Revenue Service

As we get into tax season, the IRS is reminding taxpayers to be on the lookout for scam e-mails, texts,  and phone calls aimed at tricking you into disclosing personal and financial information that could be used to steal your identity and financial assets. The IRS does not send out unsolicited e-mails, phone calls or texts asking for personal information.

The IRS has seen a recent increase in these scams, many of which originate outside the United States.  To date, investigations have identified sites hosting hundreds of IRS-related phishing scams.  These scam websites have been found to originate in at least 20 different countries.

 Scammers claiming to be from the IRS, tell you that you are due a federal tax refund, and direct you to a website that appears to be a genuine IRS site.  The bogus sites contain forms or interactive web pages similar to IRS forms and web pages.

Don’t be fooled!  These sites and forms have been modified to request detailed personal and financial information from the e-mail recipients. E-mail addresses involving users in professional and educational communities seem to be heavily targeted.

The information obtained is then used to steal the taxpayer identity and financial assets.  Typically, identity thieves use someone’s personal data to empty the victim’s financial accounts, run up charges on the victim’s existing credit cards, apply for new loans, credit cards, services, or benefits in the victim’s name and even file fraudulent tax returns.

The IRS does not send out unsolicited e-mails or ask for detailed personal information.  Additionally, the IRS never asks people for their PIN numbers, passwords or similar secret access information for their credit card, bank, or other financial accounts. The IRS primarily uses the mail when they need to notify you regarding any tax-related matter. They do not phone you late at night, or text you.

For more information on phishing (suspicious e-mails) and identity theft, visit the IRS Web site at www.irs.gov .

For information on preventing or handling the aftermath of identity theft, visit the Federal Trade Commission Web sites at www.consumer.gov/idtheft and www.OnGuardOnline.gov (and click on Topics).

Please report the fraudulent misuse of the IRS name, logo, forms or other IRS property by calling the Treasury inspector General for Tax Administration toll-free hotline at 1-800-366-4484.

For more information and tips, visit our web site at www.lincolncountysheriff.net and Like us on Facebook at Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office – Oregon.

Expanding vaccination rate in Lincoln County

Stepping up vaccination rate

Lincoln County Public Health and County Emergency Management are in the process of contacting eligible Phase 1a agencies to receive their COVID-19 vaccine.

However, due to the extensive listing of the eligible agencies in Phase 1A, County Public Health is canvasing the entire county to make sure that they are aware of the vaccine distribution process and the steps they need to take to participate.

If you or your agency meet the following criteria for Phase 1A and have NOT been contacted by Lincoln County Public Health or County Emergency Management, then you are encouraged to complete the on-line Lincoln County vaccine needs assessment survey as soon as possible.

Eligible groups in Phase 1A can be found in detail in the “Phase 1a Vaccine Sequencing Plan” document located here https://sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le3527.pdf

Phase 1a groups include the following:

  • Hospitals and Urgent Care Clinics
  • Long-term Care facilities
  • Emergency Medical Services Providers and other first responders
  • Hospice programs
  • Mobile Crisis Care and related services
  • Secure transport
  • Corrections facilities
  • Outpatient medical care services
  • Integrative Health Services (massage, acupuncture, chiropractic, etc.)
  • In-Home care services (agency and independent licensed workers)
  • Day Treatment services
  • Non-emergency medical transport
  • Public Health
  • Death care workers
  • Medical Clinics – Dental, Vision, General Practice Providers
  • Educational Facilities (teachers, support staff, and daycare) have since been added to Phase 1A

The survey can be accessed here:
https://app.smartsheet.com/b/form/ecedca1cc0cd4314a0e911dd32305a99

When the county is ready to move to Phase 1B, notices will be posted on our website, social media, and we will notify local community groups, healthcare providers and media outlets.  Phase 1B will include people age 75 and older and frontline essential workers, with more detail being developed by the State Vaccine Advisory Group now.

If agencies have any questions, please email or call (541) 265-0621 Option #0, LincolnCoCallCenter@co.lincoln.or.us

More vaccinations more quickly – Gov. Kate Brown

Governor Brown
Tracking the virus…

Governor Brown sets goal of ramping up to 12,000 vaccinations per day within two weeks

Salem, OR—Governor Kate Brown today issued a statement on COVID-19 vaccination in Oregon:

“Let me be clear: we must vaccinate Oregonians as quickly as possible. Oregon families, schools, and businesses are counting on rapid vaccine distribution. We all are.

“By percentage of our population, Oregon has administered about the same number of vaccinations as other states, and distribution will continue to ramp up quickly. We have increased vaccinations from about 3,700 given in our first week to over 29,000 in the last week.

“But Oregon, like most of the country, is not moving fast enough. All states are grappling with the same logistical challenges, and while we are making steady progress, we must move even more quickly when every vaccination has the potential to save someone’s life.

“Today, I directed the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) to achieve the benchmark of 12,000 vaccinations administered in Oregon per day by the end of the next two weeks. That will put us on track to deploy every vaccine we have in our hands each week. OHA will be working with health care providers, pharmacies, and local public health partners to streamline the distribution process to achieve that goal.

“This is an all-hands-on-deck effort, and I have directed OHA to partner as widely as possible to ensure we are using all available resources to ramp up Oregon’s vaccinations rapidly.”

Pumping up Lincoln County School District future leaders and learners…in a little bit different way…

Lincoln County School District has received $100,000 Grant from the Oregon Department of Education to Expand Paid Opportunity to Classified Staff

Through the Growth of Your Own Teachers Rural Teacher Pathway Project Classified Staff Can Become Licensed Educators

The Lincoln County School District and Oregon Coast Community College have partnered together to provide a pathway for LCSD classified staff to become teachers or other licensed staff.  In an effort to diversify our workforce, LCSD received a Grow Your Own grant from the Oregon Department of Education to provide financial opportunities to existing staff to pursue further education in becoming a licensed educator.  Preference will be given to those classified staff who are bilingual, bicultural, biliterate, or meet other diversity criteria.

The LCSD will now offer three education pathways, the above pathway for classified staff, along with two ongoing Pathways for students who graduate from LCSD. The programs offer paid classroom experience while enrolled at Oregon Coast Community College through the Early Childhood Pathway, or an Associates of Arts Oregon Transfer (AAOT) related to an elementary education degree in partnership with OCCC and Western Oregon University. 

Interested staff can learn more about the new program by attending an information session. Two upcoming dates are planned:

1/20/21, 4-5 pm

Zoom Link:

https://zoom.us/j/99255603726?pwd=blNvdW9DUnJzRmg5d241VTRPZlBnQT09

1/27/21, 4-5 pm

Zoom Link:

https://zoom.us/j/98592371486?pwd=aUttd1IyWkkwYlZ2QW8vaGVIbWp5QT09

(more…)

Joy to the World!!

Baby Baca first to be born at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in 2021

[Jan. 5, 2021– Newport, Oregon] – Rain driven by a south wind hit the hospital window, but newborn Rogan Michael Baca was snug in his Oregon State University attire and safe in his parents’ arms.  Born at 9:35 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 2, Rogan was the first baby to be born at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in 2021, and the first to be born to parents Taryn Fortin and Bryan Baca.

The couple, who live in Toledo, said the hospital staff was amazing during Taryn’s labor, delivery and recovery. Rogan was due on Dec. 26 but waited a week to be born. Even after labor was induced, it was necessary to have a cesarean section, which was performed by OB/GYN physician B. Edward Yanke, DO.

Taryn said Rogan wasn’t eager to come out, but he weighed a healthy 8 pounds, 1 ounce and was 21 inches long at birth.  “We knew Rogan would be either a Christmas baby or a New Year’s baby,” Bryan Baca said. Both he and Taryn have extended family close by eager to welcome the new family home.

Baby Rogan Michael Baca is snuggled by his parents, Taryn Fortin and Bryan Baca.

A few words from Wallace Kaufman….

Boiler Bay wave hammering our common ground….
Joy Burton photo

An Essay by Wallace Kaufman –

From politicians, the media, and from many friends across the political spectrum I have heard the question, “How is it even possible to find common ground?” The question is rhetorical, asked by people who no longer believe Americans have common ground. We do.

History is clear that we have been more divided. No presidential campaign was more bitter than John Adams vs. Thomas Jefferson after Jefferson, as Adams’ vice president, may have committed treason by conspiring to destroy Adams’ efforts for a peace treaty with France. Both campaigns hired vicious journalists to sling fake news at each other.

And when was America more divided than during the Civil War and the Reconstruction that followed? Our divisions during that war killed over 700,000 Americans.

Can we find common ground, that common question asked across the political spectrum, is itself common ground—everyone wants a way to recognize some unifying beliefs or character.

There is yet more common ground—the vast majority want peaceful expression of our differences. Only very small groups on right and left believe violence solves anything.

Is there a common American character? Consider the view of Rose Ingalls, Wilder Lane, who some might recognize as the prototype for Laura in the Little House series written by her mother. Lane attended the Russian Revolution in 1917 as an American communist. A few years later, however, she recognized that communism ran counter to human nature, and in her foreign experience she recognized a special American character. I think we can still recognize this common character in her words published in the depths of the Great Depression in 1936.

“Americans today are the most reckless and lawless of peoples. We are also the most imaginative, the most temperamental, the most infinitely varied people. We are the kindest people on earth; kind every day to one another, and sympathetically responsive to every rumor of distress. Only Americans ever made millions of small personal sacrifices in order to pour wealth over the world, relieving suffering in such distant places as Armenia and Japan. Everywhere, in shops, streets, factories, elevators, on highways and on farms, Americans are the most friendly and courteous people. There is more laughter and more song in America than anywhere else. Such are some of the human values that grew from individualism while individualism was creating America.”

In that same essay, “Credo,” she says that we will not think of ourselves in ideological terms, as opposing factions if only we “look at this vast, infinitely various, completely unstandardized, subtle, complex, passionate, strong, weak, beautiful, inorganic and intensely vital land. How could we be so bemused by books and by the desire of our own minds to make a pattern?”

When we recognize that we are individuals before we are members of a political faction, we have common ground and we can talk to each other. 

As a professional mediator for over three decades, I have seen many people and groups find mutual understanding and then common ground after they swore they had none.

A Massachusetts mediator brought together woman passionately pro-life and passionately pro choice. They began talking and liked each other so much that they extended their discussions beyond mediation. In North Carolina I saw a Klan leader and a black community activist talk and recognize what poor whites and poor blacks had in common.

When we recognize that almost everyone wants clean air and water, healthy forests, beautiful landscapes, and the preservation of wildlife that becomes common ground. 

 

Defenders of Wildlife made peace with ranchers by reimbursing them for livestock killed by wolves and rewarding ranchers who protected wolf dens. Hunting groups have donated millions to preserve natural habitat and viable wildlife populations. The Nature Conservancy has raised large amounts by carefully leasing some of its lands for oil and gas production.

Oddly enough our various community rights groups have a lot in common with radical ranchers like the Bundy brothers—both wanting to solve issues at the community level.

Here in Lincoln County the atheists of Newport Non-Believers has a booth at the county fair and has had friendly debates with evangelicals.

Oregonians need to talk to each other. Unfortunately some of the groups that try to bring people together to talk out differences are themselves too clearly identified by ideology. Unfortunately our members of Congress can’t send out a bulletin without bashing their opponents. (I note that our state representative David Gomberg is a welcome exception.)

Oregon does have, however, very skilled and successful mediators, some who call mediation their profession, others who are just excellent listeners and creative thinkers like Rep. Gomberg. Put them to work.

Jazz trumpeter and civil rights activist Wynton Marsalis is right, “Our form of democracy affords us the opportunity to mine a collective intelligence, a collective creativity, and a collective human heritage.” If we can mine gold and bitcoin, we can mine our own heritage. So far too many miners in schools and universities are looking for impurities – not the gold.

Wallace Kaufman

PO Box 756 

Newport, OR 97365 USA

541 995 4785

cell 541 351 5205

Lincoln City man arrested outside Oregon Legislative Building

On Wednesday, January 6th Oregon State Police, Salem Police Department, and Marion County Sheriff’s Office personnel were monitoring a protest that was occurring at the Oregon State Capitol. 

At approximately 2:00 P.M., a group of counter protesters arrived at the Capitol and a fight broke out between the opposing sides.  Law Enforcement quickly separated the two groups and worked to keep the two groups apart for the remainder of the day.

David Willis (43)  of Lincoln City, was arrested and charged with harassment and disorderly conduct.  The investigation is continuing and more charges are possible after consultation with the Marion County District Attorney.

A basket of wine and all is fine…

The Newport Seafood & Wine Festival, presented by Chinook Winds Casino Resort, will return for the 44thyear to Newport on February 26-28, 2021.

Safety measures have been first and foremost in the planning of this event. Some details have since changed since the last media release.  

“To go” festival baskets are available to purchase online, to be picked up during the festival weekend or shipped. Baskets include two bottles of wine (valued $25-$35 each from a selection of pacific northwest wines), two commemorative 2021 wine glasses, a can of locally canned Mo’s tuna, a can of Newport Daze Rogue beer, a wine bottle opener, and 20% off coupon code for a selection of online vendors–many of whom are usually represented at the festival. Optional add-ons include festival merchandise and a Local Ocean DockBox meal kit to prepare at home.

Attendees will pick up their “to go” basket at the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce office, located at 555 SW Coast Highway in Newport, at a selected time throughout the weekend. They are encouraged take their festival basket back to their home, vacation rental or hotel and enjoy the seafood and wine items with their small group.

Second, two interactive virtual experiences will be held online during the festival weekend. Friday evening, February 26, Chinook Winds Casino Resort and the Newport Chamber will host a virtual live Chef-led cooking demo featuring renowned Executive Chef Michael Durham from Chinook Winds, where he will guide viewers through the prep and cooking of a variety of distinctive dishes.

Saturday evening, February 27, will feature an interactive experience including live wine tasting, winemaking demonstration, seafood cooking demonstration, tips on the coastal seafood industry from a local expert, trivia, and prizes courtesy of Chinook Winds Casino Resort.

The “to go” festival baskets are available online at seafoodandwine.com. The deadline to order a basket to be shipped is February 8. The deadline to order a basket for pickup in Newport is February 15.

The Newport Chamber encourages attendees to safely enjoy the Coast while respecting all travel and lodging guidelines.

For more information, call the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce at 541-265-8801 or visit www.seafoodandwine.com.

 

Angry Trump supporters have penetrated the Congressional Building

11:10am  Angry Donald Trump supporters, believing what President Trump has been saying for weeks, that the November general election was rigged.  Their belief flies in the face of over 60 judicial rulings that it wasn’t rigged.  It’s like the old saying, “It’s the irresistible force against the immovable object,  Trump protesters are now inside the capital building.  Capital Police probably have their hands full.  The drama is unfolding on your local PBS station.

11:38am  Capital Police have locked down the building to clear the protesters from the building.

Over 1,000 new Covid-19 cases – 44 passed on…

January 5, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,059 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 44 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 44 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,550, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,059 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 119,488.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA recorded 3,964 doses of vaccine administered — including 317 second doses — raising the state’s total number of doses administered to 55,239. This figure is based on preliminary reports of 2,818 doses administered yesterday, as well as 1,146 administered on prior days that had not been recorded.

All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 210,975 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 494, which is 17 more than yesterday. There are 107 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (18), Clackamas (139), Clatsop (3), Columbia (3), Coos (17), Crook (22), Curry (2), Deschutes (69), Douglas (21), Harney (1), Hood River (5), Jackson (69), Jefferson (10), Josephine (26), Klamath (10), Lake (2), Lane (65), Lincoln (6), Linn (42), Malheur (16), Marion (99), Morrow (6), Multnomah (163), Polk (28), Sherman (1), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (75), Union (3), Wallowa (2), Wasco (6), Washington (100) and Yamhill (23).

Oregon’s 1,507th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Tillamook County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 1 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,508th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 29 and died on Dec. 24 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,509th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Clackamas County who died on Dec. 28 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,510th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Columbia County who tested positive on Dec. 15 and died on Dec. 31 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,511st COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old man in Coos County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 4 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions. (more…)

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