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I was snookered by VRD’s being placed on both sides of my home….

Robin Hochtrtt says “I was Snookered.”

My neighborhood is a member of the 15neighborhoods Coalition. We are gathering Petition signatures for a Short Term Rental (STR) Ballot Measure for residential neighborhoods. Go to www.15neighborhoods.com to download a petition signature sheet, sign and date (2 places), and send it to P.O. Box 390, Depoe Bay. All registered Lincoln County voters can sign.

I was unfamiliar with Short Term Vacation Rental (STR/VRD) business until January 18, 2018, when I found myself sandwiched between two short-term rentals – each licensed for 11 people. 

My initial response was “These houses must have huge septic tanks” because so many renters were there. Through research, I learned that the County had no septic records for these houses. These two VRD’s were built in the 1940s, with various additions added over the years.  Before 1971, septic permits were not required. My house was built in 1999. The state Department of Environmental Quality requires that I contract with an inspector for two inspections annually who then sends an annual Report to DEQ.

Living next to an VRD is very inconvenient. Picking up garbage or calling a (not really) Local Contact to pick up garbage was tiresome but necessary to keep the rats and raccoons at bay. Having 20+ people show up for parties and being told it was OK so long as only 11 people spend the night was unsettling. 

Along the way, I also learned that the Maximum Occupancy Limits were unenforceable anyway because the Sheriff would not enter the premises without a warrant to count heads. Assuming permission was granted, and more renters than licensed were present, it was up to the renters to decide who had to leave (and probably return after the Sheriff left. No record was kept because citations are not issued.  

What if they are also violating the noise prohibition after 10 pm? This is not a VRD-specific law. It applies to everyone living in the unincorporated areas of the County. They’d be told to pipe down. If they did, there would be no citation even if the Sheriff observed it. This is only a misdemeanor in Lincoln County – not worth the time if the citation is appealed, and the Deputy would have to appear as a witness. This is true of parking as well – another violation that applies Countywide. 

The Property Manager and the Investor suffer NO CONSEQUENCES. The “cost” of VRD management is passed on to the neighbors (1) as the “first responders” to call in a complaint and (2) pay taxes so the Sheriff can add deputies and administrative staff to process applications and respond to complaints.

Then I learned that I lived in Lincoln County’s most restrictive Residential Zone (R-1-A). This Residential Zone is so restrictive that not even Bed and Breakfast Inns are allowed. I told County Counsel about this only to learn that “short term rentals” were a residential use according to the Oregon Supreme Court and allowed in Residential Zones. 

I was snookered. This is not true now and was not true when Lincoln County adopted its VRD regulations in 2016, according to my attorney.

By now, I started paying more attention to the long term housing shortage problem. I heard that housing was not affordable and increasingly unavailable at any price. I heard from a government official that more STR business licenses were issued than new construction permits in 2018-2019. It felt like many problems were interrelated and that the vacation home industry was the nexus.

The Goal of 15neighborhoods is to restrict and eventually phase-out STRs only from our Residential neighborhoods over five years. STRs are useful, but should have been licensed only in the County’s Tourist/Commercial Zones. 

Our website includes Tabs for Community Response, Research and Resources, How to File a Complaint with the County, and FAQs. Behind the Tab “Views from the Steering Committee” are thoughtful essays, such as:

Want a Problem You Can Fix on May 18?

Commissioners: Who is Your Constituent?

Short Term Vacation Renting is an Extractive Industry

Are Rural Neighborhoods the STR Industry’s First Responders?

​Why 15neighborhoods started an Electronic Petition Drive during a Pandemic

​Violations without Consequences

The Newly Unhoused: Short and Long Term Solutions

Short-term rentals: Compliance and Enforcement

Growth and Climate Refugees

County Crumbles Under the Weight of Too Much Growth and Not Enough Careful Planning

Time to Revise our Thinking about Emergency STR Evacuation Planning in Residential Neighborhoods

Check us out. Send us questions and comments through “Contact Us” on the website, 15Neighborhoods.com

Robin Hochtritt
Unincorporated Lincoln County

 

Mary’s Peak Group up and around…

Mary’s Peak
In mid-winter…

January 10, 2021 

Here are our activities in the next 2 weeks

The Marys Peak Group Executive Committee will be meeting January 12th via Zoom from 6:00 pm to 8:00 pm.  All MPG members are welcome to attend.  Contact MarysPeakGroup@Oregon.Sierraclub.org

to get the login information.  This will be the last meeting of the 2020 excom which will wrap up old business and accept the results of our last election. The 2021 excom will then take over to elect officers and plan the year ahead.

Once the Marys Peak Group is allowed to resume offering and conducting outings by the National Office of the Sierra Club and by Governor Brown’s phase-in levels, would you in the meantime be Interested in Becoming a Leader for Sierra Club Outings?

If you enjoy sharing Oregon’s incredible outdoors with others, then we hope you will become an outing leader for the Marys Peak Group (MPG), the local group of the Oregon Chapter of the Sierra Club, Having new leaders is critical to MPG’s goal of getting people out into Oregon’s outdoors. We’d love to have you!  Doing so will add to the number and variety of hikes and outings we offer.

Having a love of the outdoors is the essential characteristic of an MPG leader. The purpose of MPG’s outings is to share parts of Oregon that you have discovered and enjoy. A background or interest in any of the natural sciences is a wonderful plus but not necessary.

What are the Advantages of Becoming an Outing Leader?

  • Provides an incentive or motivation for you to find new trails in Oregon
  • Opportunities to share those or your favorite trails with others
  • Sharing your pleasure & joy will help get people out enjoying nature
  • Meeting and interacting with other lovers & enjoyers of the outdoors
  • Chances of learning new insights from participants on your trips
  • Strengthens your organizational skills

Ken Fitschen, Assistant Chair, Jules Moritz, Outings Chair, and Robert Verhoogen, Chair Emeritus, will make the process as smooth as possible. Contact one of them via e-mail if you are interested in finding out more about becoming an outing leader:

– Ken Fitschen’s e-mail = kenfits@comcast.net

– Jules Moritz’s e-mail = mpg.outings.chair@gmail.com

– Robert Verhoogen’s e-mail = rverhoogen@mac.com

 

Announcements… (1 new) 

1)  Per OSU Research Forests – 

JANUARY ELK HUNT ACTIVE ON DUNN FOREST AND TURKEY HUNT APPLICATIONS OPEN

218A NE Alsea Controlled Elk Hunt Active through January 31st on the Dunn Forest

The 218A NE Alsea Controlled Elk Hunt is occurring on the Dunn Forest throughout the month of January.  This is a very small hunt, as only 11 people were granted permission through the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. These hunters were sent a permission letter in the mail, granting them access to the Dunn Forest for walk-in hunting.  Hunters may use a rifle or bow, and are hunting for antlerless elk (cows).

You may or may not see hunters while you are out on the Dunn Forest over the next month.  Here are some tips from the USDA Forest Service on hunting safety for hunters and other recreators.

Here is a map of the area where hunting is allowed, for your reference.

NOTE:  There will NOT be any Peak View mailings UNLESS there is new information to report from OSU Forestry, the Sierra Club National office, or the Governor’s Office about the opening up of recreation areas, or from our Executive Committee.

1) Newcomers to MPG outing events, please view the new GENERAL OUTING POLICY on our MPG website by clicking on copying and pasting   <http://oregon2.sierraclub.org/marys-peak/outings >  and then clicking on < Get Outdoors/Outings and Policies > before pre-registering for or attending an outing. 

2) Carpooling: Given the changing gas prices when car-pooling, take a 

moment to ask the leader for the suggested reimbursement rate per passenger per hour of driving for the outing. 

3) Contacting Marys Peak Group:  Marys Peak Group contact information is obtainable at  https://oregon2.sierraclub.org/marys-peak/contact Listed are the Executive Committee members and the Administrative and Program Coordinators.

4) Facebook: Marys Peak Group – Sierra Club is on Facebook.  Check out MPG’s Facebook page to view pictures of past hikes and events, and learn about upcoming opportunities.  Post pictures from hikes and outings you participate in! Copy and paste the address https://www.facebook.com/pages/Marys-Peak-Group-Sierra-Club/159377960779

5) Minutes of the MPG Executive Committee can be viewed at the aforementioned website by clicking on the About Us/Ex Comm Meeting Minutes tab or by clicking on https://oregon2.sierraclub.org/marys-peak/minutes  for the minutes of the virtual meeting.

The Peak View

Marys Peak Group – Sierra Club

P.O Box 863, Corvallis, OR 97339

http://oregon2.sierraclub.org/marys-peak

Toledo Library gets a nice grant from the Keane Family Fund!

Toledo Public Library Receives Surprise Grant of $10,000

The Toledo Public Library is pleased to announce the receipt of a $10,000 grant from the Keane Family Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation. The unanticipated award is granted to assist in the upgrade of technology and equipment for our community meeting room. We look forward to offering our small community state of the art technology. We anticipate meeting the needs of those who require access to presentations from remote locations, such as The Lincoln County Genealogical Society, the local RAIN program, and entrepreneurs who need robust meeting spaces for partners and employees located around the county, nation, or the world. This was a delightful and encouraging gift during the Holiday Season.

Trauma injury at South Beach State Park

1:03pm – Newport Fire-Rescue are headed for South Beach State Park on a report of someone who has suffered a traumatic injury.  No specifics as yet.

1:07pm  Reports from the scene is that a woman was in the surf and got hit by a wave causing injury.

Traffic Collision on Highway 20 just east of Newport

9:47pm. Report of a traffic collision on Highway 50 at SE Norman Street immediately east of Newport. Watch for emergency responders.  There are a number of people involved.  None seem to be seriously injured.  Truck pulling a trailer is involved.

9:55pm. Westbound lane is blocked.  Watch for traffic congestion.

House fire northwest of Eddyville

6pm  Report of a house fire northwest of Eddyville at 4063 Crystal Creek Loop.  Caller says there’s smoke coming out of an electrical outlet.  Eddyville has a new fire department behind the local post office.  Response time for a volunteer fire department can be lengthy.

6:10pm  Back up firefighters are being called to the scene.  A fire unit from Toledo has been called to help out.

Covid-19 Update

Oregon reports 1,643 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 28 new deaths

Oregon adds 13,448 new COVID-19 vaccinations to statewide total

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 28 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,603 the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

State health officials also added 13,448 new vaccinations to the state’s total.

In addition, state health officials have updated the December 30 Weekly Report to correct a reporting error.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Yesterday, 13,448 new doses were added to the state immunization registry. Of this total, 8,768 vaccine doses were administered on January 8th and 4,680 were administered on previous days (but entered into the state registry by providers on January 8th). As of yesterday, vaccination sites had administered 34 percent of Oregon’s current allocation of vaccine doses.

Oregon’s cumulative total is now 88,362 first and second doses administered. All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

These data are preliminary and subject to change. OHA’s dashboards provide regularly updated vaccination data, however the dashboard will not be updated today.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 421, which is 30 fewer than yesterday. There are 81 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is seven fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.  (more…)

You’ve got questions about vaccinations – they’ve got answers!

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Revised January 7, 2021

Resources

  • Oregon’s Phase 1a Vaccine Sequencing Plan:sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le3527.pdf
  • Oregon’s COVID-19 Vaccination Trends dashboard: bit.ly/ORCovidVaccinationTrends
  • OHA COVID-19 vaccine website: covidvaccine.oregon.gov Spanish: vacunacovid.oregon.gov

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General
Q1: Where can I find more information about the COVID-19 vaccines?

A1: Information regarding safety, sequencing, provider enrollment for administering vaccines and more can be found on the OHA COVID-19 vaccine website at https://covidvaccine.oregon.gov/.

Q2: Will children be vaccinated against COVID-19?

A2: At this point, no. The current Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) do not allow for children under 16 (Pfizer) or under 18 (Moderna) to be vaccinated. In the future, COVID-19 vaccines may be approved for use among younger children.

Q3: How can I find out when and where I can get vaccinated?

A3: The Oregon Health Authority is working with Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs), hospitals and other community partners on developing operational plans to ensure that all individuals included in Phase 1a and in future phases know where and when they can get vaccinated. As these plans are finalized, they will be communicated to the public. Initial vaccine administration is occurring with specific groups as outlined by the Phase 1a Vaccine Sequencing Plan and is being carried out by hospitals, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, LPHAs, skilled nursing facilities and other partners serving Group 1 populations. If further guidance is needed, please contact the OHA Vaccine Planning unit by emailing COVID19.Vaccine@dhsoha.state.or.us.

(more…)

Oregon’s Phase 1-A Vaccine Plan – Frequently asked questions…

Covid-19 Virus has not given up. It’s still a deadly invader….

Oregon’s Phase 1a Vaccine Sequencing Plan: Frequently Asked Questions

Revised January 7, 2021

Resources

  • Oregon’s Phase 1a Vaccine Sequencing Plan: sharedsystems.dhsoha.state.or.us/DHSForms/Served/le3527.pdf
  • Oregon’s COVID-19 Vaccination Trends dashboard: bit.ly/ORCovidVaccinationTrends
  • OHA COVID-19 vaccine website: covidvaccine.oregon.gov Spanish: vacunacovid.oregon.gov

General
Q1: Where can I find more information about the COVID-19 vaccines?

A1: Information regarding safety, sequencing, provider enrollment for administering vaccines and more can be found on the OHA COVID-19 vaccine website at https://covidvaccine.oregon.gov/.

Q2: Will children be vaccinated against COVID-19?

A2: At this point, no. The current Emergency Use Authorizations (EUAs) from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) do not allow for children under 16 (Pfizer) or under 18 (Moderna) to be vaccinated. In the future, COVID-19 vaccines may be approved for use among younger children.

Q3: How can I find out when and where I can get vaccinated?

A3: The Oregon Health Authority is working with Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs), hospitals and other community partners on developing operational plans to ensure that all individuals included in Phase 1a and in future phases know where and when they can get vaccinated. As these plans are finalized, they will be communicated to the public. Initial vaccine administration is occurring with specific

1

OHA 2390V (1/8/2021)

groups as outlined by the Phase 1a Vaccine Sequencing Plan and is being carried out by hospitals, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, LPHAs, skilled nursing facilities and other partners serving Group 1 populations. If further guidance is needed, please contact the OHA Vaccine Planning unit by emailing COVID19.Vaccine@dhsoha.state.or.us.

  1. Q4:  Will I be able to get vaccinated near my community?
    A4: Yes. Plans are being developed to ensure that vaccine administration is available throughout the state.
  2. Q5:  Is the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) planning on making COVID-19 vaccinations mandatory?A5: There are no plans for OHA to require the COVID-19 vaccination, but OHA strongly recommends vaccination for the safety and health of the entire community.
  3. Q6:  Can I require my employee to sign a liability waiver before they get a COVID- 19 vaccine?A6: Organizations should contact their legal counsel if they have questions about liability and COVID-19 vaccine administration. There is a federal law called the PREP Act which provides immunity for claims of loss related to covered countermeasures, like vaccines. For additional information, please visit https://www.phe.gov/Preparedness/legal/prepact/Pages/default.aspx.
  4. Q7:  If I want to become a COVID-19 vaccine provider, how do I do that?A7: Phased enrollment of health care providers who wish to administer COVID-19 vaccine has begun for the following provider types: hospitals, LPHAs and Federally-recognized Tribes that are not enrolled with the federal government to receive COVID-19 vaccine. The COVID-19 Healthcare Partner Resources page has information about enrolling with the Immunization Program. Click on the “Vaccine Planning” box under the orange line for more details.
  5. Q8:  Do providers administering vaccines need to verify that an individual falls within an eligible group within current Phase 1 or future phases before they can get vaccinated?A8: Providers should at the very least have an individual self-attest that they fall within Phase 1a, or if vaccinations are happening in other phases, that they are in that phase. The Oregon Health Authority is not requiring verification, has not established standards for verification, and has no plans to request verification documentation from vaccinating providers. Vaccine providers may include self- attestation questions in their vaccine administration protocols at their discretion. (more…)

Virus spreading at a record rate…

Oregon reports 1,755 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths

Oregon reports 1,755 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 7 new deaths 

COVID-19 has claimed seven more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,575, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today. 

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,755 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 122,847. 

Vaccinations in Oregon: Today, OHA recorded 7,994 doses of vaccine administered — including 578 second doses — raising the state’s total number of doses administered to 74,914. This figure is based on preliminary reports of 5,706 doses administered yesterday, as well as 2,288 doses administered on prior days that had not been recorded. OHA’s daily media updates provide information that is preliminary and subject to change. OHA’sdashboards provide more updated vaccination data. 

All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs). 

To date, 252,350 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon. 

COVID-19 hospitalizations: The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 451, which is 11 fewer than yesterday. There are 88 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is three fewer than yesterday. The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity. More information about hospital capacity can be found here. 

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (43), Clackamas (203), Clatsop (8), Columbia (12), Coos (18), Crook (3), Curry (4), Deschutes (92), Douglas (27), Gilliam (3), Harney (1), Hood River (20), Jackson (83), Jefferson (3), Josephine (60), Klamath (115), Lake (1), Lane (105), Lincoln (5), Linn (42), Malheur (24), Marion (179), Morrow (12), Multnomah (256), Polk (42), Sherman (4), Tillamook (5), Umatilla (44), Union (20), Wasco (18), Washington (253) and Yamhill (47). 

Here is more information on the deaths reported today: 

Oregon’s 1,569th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old woman in Clackamas County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 6 at her residence. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,570th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Jan. 4 at his residence. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,571st COVID-19 death is a 62-year-old man in Jackson County who tested positive on Dec. 29 and died on Jan. 6 at his residence. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,572nd COVID-19 death is a 68-year-old woman in Marion County who tested positive on Dec. 3 and died on Jan. 3 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,573rd COVID-19 death is a 50-year-old man in Umatilla County who tested positive on Dec. 27 and died on Jan. 5 at Good Shepherd Community Hospital. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,574th COVID-19 death is a 91-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 21 and died on Jan. 5 at Oregon Health & Science University. He had underlying conditions. 

Oregon’s 1,575th COVID-19 death is a 76-year-old man in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 26 and died on Jan. 6 at PeaceHealth Sacred Health Medical Center at Riverbend. He had underlying conditions. 

NOTE: Updated information is available for Oregon’s 1,515th death. She is a 53-year-old woman in Harney county who died on Jan. 4 at St. Charles Medical Center — Bend. She was originally reported to have died at Harney District Hospital. 

Senator Ron Wyden on Thursday’s assault on the U.S. Congress

Statement by U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, D-Oregon

Wyden Statement on Senators Cruz and Hawley

Sen. Ron Wyden
D-Oregon

Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator Ron Wyden, D-Ore., today released the following statement calling for the resignations of U.S. Sens. Josh Hawley, R-Mo., and Ted Cruz, R-Texas:

“Every member of the Senate takes a sacred oath to protect and defend the Constitution of the United States. Upholding that oath is a matter of conscience. The behavior of President Trump and Senators Hawley and Cruz culminating in the assault on the seat of our democracy shocks that conscience.

“Any senator exhorting such an assault violates their sworn oath and is unworthy of holding federal office. There must be consequences for senators who would foment a violent mob for personal gain. I call on Senators Hawley and Cruz to resign and accept the responsibility which they so clearly bear.”

Untreated Hearing Loss Can Lead to Safety Risks

 

Le’Anne McEachern, Au.D.
Doctor of Audiology

Untreated Hearing Loss Can Lead to Safety Risks

Untreated hearing loss can give rise to a number of problems, including depression and anxiety. The first step to addressing those concerns is as simple as taking a hearing test.  Reduced hearing loss means reduced sensory input, or the feeling that the walls are closing in on a person. This leads to symptoms that can mirror certain cognitive disorders, such as dementia.  People who have hearing loss can fail to respond, or fail to respond in the appropriate way or in a timely fashion.

For Alzheimer’s disease, symptoms include depression, anxiety, disorientation and defensiveness. For untreated hearing loss: Depression, anxiety, feelings of isolation and defensiveness.  But it isn’t just misidentifying the effects of hearing loss with a cognitive disorder. Safety issues also arise when a person can’t hear a fire alarm, the doorbell or telephone. Being able to do so is crucial for people who want to stay in their homes as they age, and taking a hearing test and using hearing amplification devices is a step in that direction.

Family members play an important role in helping their aging parents identify and deal with hearing loss.  But some people resist having their hearing tested, out of fear of what the results might be.  Children can talk with their parents to reassure them that there are options to help with hearing loss.
Still, not everyone wants to take that first step.

Another symptom of untreated hearing loss is denying that it is even happening. In some cases it takes a traumatic event, an embarrassing social situation or a mistake in the workplace to spur a person to get their hearing tested and adopt the use of hearing aids.  Hearing loss may also have an impact on balance, since people with untreated hearing loss exist in a sphere of reduced sensory input. The hearing test is painless, usually covered by medical insurance and the information is helpful. (original article in Medscape)

SeaTowne Shopping Center
1622 N. Coast Highway
Newport, OR 97365
541 272-5015 fax 541 272-5016

Covid-19 Virus still a very large threat. We’re still laying low and hoping for the best…

UPDATE FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF LINCOLN COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT (LCSD)

Dear Community and Staff of LCSD,  

First of all, I wish you all a very Happy 2021 New Year! May this year bring love, peace, and health to you all. 

On December 23rd Governor Brown communicated a statement that said that the State’s COVID Metrics would no longer be mandatory but will now be advisory. Her goal is to bring all Oregon students back to a model of in-person instruction by February 15, 2021. 

Lincoln County was downgraded from Extreme Risk to High Risk. Our numbers for the last 2 weeks were 217.4 per 100,000. In the two-week period before this, we were at 174 which is less than the 200 per 100,000 required for Extreme Risk so we were downgraded to High Risk. As you can see, our numbers are back up and still concerning.  We have a lot of work to do to get our numbers down and create a safer community in which to bring staff and students back. 

On Monday, January 4, Oregon’s superintendents met with the Governor about this new “advisory” status of the metrics. This is a huge shift.  Governor Brown heard 3 important requests from us: a) Working with our labor unions to ensure that bringing students back to school is a top priority, b) establishing a timeline for educators to receive the COVID vaccine, and c) working with Oregon Health Authority to move aside roadblocks to re-opening.

To that end, the leadership of the LCSD has decided the following:

  1. We will bring students back Hybrid K-6 on Monday, February 1. Hybrid is two days per week full-day school and 3 days per week of online learning. The cohorts are Monday/Thursday and Tuesday/Friday with no Wednesday in-person school for students. Students are still learning online on Wednesdays.
  2.  We will bring back students Hybrid 7-12 Monday, February 8 (the start of semester 2). The principals at secondary will have the choice to actually bring kids back the week before February 8 for orientation for either one or two days. More detailed information will be coming out specifically about this so that you can plan.

Our hope is that we get a plan for COVID vaccinations and that we can all get them before February 1. I will be pushing hard for this. Regardless, we will still be bringing students back. We had students K-3 without vaccines safely and we would have had them all back by December 18 except that Lincoln County had that awful surge which, sadly, may happen again post-holiday break. Let’s hope not. What is clear is that Covid is not being spread in our schools but in our community. This is true across the nation. Many other states have children back already in person and our Governor is committed to having Oregon’s students back in school, too. 

January 19 the Governor will be giving the State another health and safety update. We will not be changing anything at least until then. Our plan is to bring students back in early February. The caveat to this is that if things go really badly for the county and something else comes out on January 19, we will have to address that. Having said that, our plan moving forward is to bring students back in early February. The district will be spending the next four weeks planning for K-12 Hybrid. 

Thank you very much,

Karen Gray, Superintendent

 

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