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Joy to the World!!

Baby Baca first to be born at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in 2021

[Jan. 5, 2021– Newport, Oregon] – Rain driven by a south wind hit the hospital window, but newborn Rogan Michael Baca was snug in his Oregon State University attire and safe in his parents’ arms.  Born at 9:35 p.m. on Saturday, Jan. 2, Rogan was the first baby to be born at Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital in 2021, and the first to be born to parents Taryn Fortin and Bryan Baca.

The couple, who live in Toledo, said the hospital staff was amazing during Taryn’s labor, delivery and recovery. Rogan was due on Dec. 26 but waited a week to be born. Even after labor was induced, it was necessary to have a cesarean section, which was performed by OB/GYN physician B. Edward Yanke, DO.

Taryn said Rogan wasn’t eager to come out, but he weighed a healthy 8 pounds, 1 ounce and was 21 inches long at birth.  “We knew Rogan would be either a Christmas baby or a New Year’s baby,” Bryan Baca said. Both he and Taryn have extended family close by eager to welcome the new family home.

Baby Rogan Michael Baca is snuggled by his parents, Taryn Fortin and Bryan Baca.

A few words from Wallace Kaufman….

Boiler Bay wave hammering our common ground….
Joy Burton photo

An Essay by Wallace Kaufman –

From politicians, the media, and from many friends across the political spectrum I have heard the question, “How is it even possible to find common ground?” The question is rhetorical, asked by people who no longer believe Americans have common ground. We do.

History is clear that we have been more divided. No presidential campaign was more bitter than John Adams vs. Thomas Jefferson after Jefferson, as Adams’ vice president, may have committed treason by conspiring to destroy Adams’ efforts for a peace treaty with France. Both campaigns hired vicious journalists to sling fake news at each other.

And when was America more divided than during the Civil War and the Reconstruction that followed? Our divisions during that war killed over 700,000 Americans.

Can we find common ground, that common question asked across the political spectrum, is itself common ground—everyone wants a way to recognize some unifying beliefs or character.

There is yet more common ground—the vast majority want peaceful expression of our differences. Only very small groups on right and left believe violence solves anything.

Is there a common American character? Consider the view of Rose Ingalls, Wilder Lane, who some might recognize as the prototype for Laura in the Little House series written by her mother. Lane attended the Russian Revolution in 1917 as an American communist. A few years later, however, she recognized that communism ran counter to human nature, and in her foreign experience she recognized a special American character. I think we can still recognize this common character in her words published in the depths of the Great Depression in 1936.

“Americans today are the most reckless and lawless of peoples. We are also the most imaginative, the most temperamental, the most infinitely varied people. We are the kindest people on earth; kind every day to one another, and sympathetically responsive to every rumor of distress. Only Americans ever made millions of small personal sacrifices in order to pour wealth over the world, relieving suffering in such distant places as Armenia and Japan. Everywhere, in shops, streets, factories, elevators, on highways and on farms, Americans are the most friendly and courteous people. There is more laughter and more song in America than anywhere else. Such are some of the human values that grew from individualism while individualism was creating America.”

In that same essay, “Credo,” she says that we will not think of ourselves in ideological terms, as opposing factions if only we “look at this vast, infinitely various, completely unstandardized, subtle, complex, passionate, strong, weak, beautiful, inorganic and intensely vital land. How could we be so bemused by books and by the desire of our own minds to make a pattern?”

When we recognize that we are individuals before we are members of a political faction, we have common ground and we can talk to each other. 

As a professional mediator for over three decades, I have seen many people and groups find mutual understanding and then common ground after they swore they had none.

A Massachusetts mediator brought together woman passionately pro-life and passionately pro choice. They began talking and liked each other so much that they extended their discussions beyond mediation. In North Carolina I saw a Klan leader and a black community activist talk and recognize what poor whites and poor blacks had in common.

When we recognize that almost everyone wants clean air and water, healthy forests, beautiful landscapes, and the preservation of wildlife that becomes common ground. 

 

Defenders of Wildlife made peace with ranchers by reimbursing them for livestock killed by wolves and rewarding ranchers who protected wolf dens. Hunting groups have donated millions to preserve natural habitat and viable wildlife populations. The Nature Conservancy has raised large amounts by carefully leasing some of its lands for oil and gas production.

Oddly enough our various community rights groups have a lot in common with radical ranchers like the Bundy brothers—both wanting to solve issues at the community level.

Here in Lincoln County the atheists of Newport Non-Believers has a booth at the county fair and has had friendly debates with evangelicals.

Oregonians need to talk to each other. Unfortunately some of the groups that try to bring people together to talk out differences are themselves too clearly identified by ideology. Unfortunately our members of Congress can’t send out a bulletin without bashing their opponents. (I note that our state representative David Gomberg is a welcome exception.)

Oregon does have, however, very skilled and successful mediators, some who call mediation their profession, others who are just excellent listeners and creative thinkers like Rep. Gomberg. Put them to work.

Jazz trumpeter and civil rights activist Wynton Marsalis is right, “Our form of democracy affords us the opportunity to mine a collective intelligence, a collective creativity, and a collective human heritage.” If we can mine gold and bitcoin, we can mine our own heritage. So far too many miners in schools and universities are looking for impurities – not the gold.

Wallace Kaufman

PO Box 756 

Newport, OR 97365 USA

541 995 4785

cell 541 351 5205

Lincoln City man arrested outside Oregon Legislative Building

On Wednesday, January 6th Oregon State Police, Salem Police Department, and Marion County Sheriff’s Office personnel were monitoring a protest that was occurring at the Oregon State Capitol. 

At approximately 2:00 P.M., a group of counter protesters arrived at the Capitol and a fight broke out between the opposing sides.  Law Enforcement quickly separated the two groups and worked to keep the two groups apart for the remainder of the day.

David Willis (43)  of Lincoln City, was arrested and charged with harassment and disorderly conduct.  The investigation is continuing and more charges are possible after consultation with the Marion County District Attorney.

A basket of wine and all is fine…

The Newport Seafood & Wine Festival, presented by Chinook Winds Casino Resort, will return for the 44thyear to Newport on February 26-28, 2021.

Safety measures have been first and foremost in the planning of this event. Some details have since changed since the last media release.  

“To go” festival baskets are available to purchase online, to be picked up during the festival weekend or shipped. Baskets include two bottles of wine (valued $25-$35 each from a selection of pacific northwest wines), two commemorative 2021 wine glasses, a can of locally canned Mo’s tuna, a can of Newport Daze Rogue beer, a wine bottle opener, and 20% off coupon code for a selection of online vendors–many of whom are usually represented at the festival. Optional add-ons include festival merchandise and a Local Ocean DockBox meal kit to prepare at home.

Attendees will pick up their “to go” basket at the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce office, located at 555 SW Coast Highway in Newport, at a selected time throughout the weekend. They are encouraged take their festival basket back to their home, vacation rental or hotel and enjoy the seafood and wine items with their small group.

Second, two interactive virtual experiences will be held online during the festival weekend. Friday evening, February 26, Chinook Winds Casino Resort and the Newport Chamber will host a virtual live Chef-led cooking demo featuring renowned Executive Chef Michael Durham from Chinook Winds, where he will guide viewers through the prep and cooking of a variety of distinctive dishes.

Saturday evening, February 27, will feature an interactive experience including live wine tasting, winemaking demonstration, seafood cooking demonstration, tips on the coastal seafood industry from a local expert, trivia, and prizes courtesy of Chinook Winds Casino Resort.

The “to go” festival baskets are available online at seafoodandwine.com. The deadline to order a basket to be shipped is February 8. The deadline to order a basket for pickup in Newport is February 15.

The Newport Chamber encourages attendees to safely enjoy the Coast while respecting all travel and lodging guidelines.

For more information, call the Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce at 541-265-8801 or visit www.seafoodandwine.com.

 

Angry Trump supporters have penetrated the Congressional Building

11:10am  Angry Donald Trump supporters, believing what President Trump has been saying for weeks, that the November general election was rigged.  Their belief flies in the face of over 60 judicial rulings that it wasn’t rigged.  It’s like the old saying, “It’s the irresistible force against the immovable object,  Trump protesters are now inside the capital building.  Capital Police probably have their hands full.  The drama is unfolding on your local PBS station.

11:38am  Capital Police have locked down the building to clear the protesters from the building.

Over 1,000 new Covid-19 cases – 44 passed on…

January 5, 2021

Contact: OHA External Relations, orcovid19.media@dhsoha.state.or.us

Oregon reports 1,059 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 44 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed 44 more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,550, the Oregon Health Authority reported at 12:01 a.m. today.

Oregon Health Authority reported 1,059 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of 12:01 a.m. today, bringing the state total to 119,488.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA recorded 3,964 doses of vaccine administered — including 317 second doses — raising the state’s total number of doses administered to 55,239. This figure is based on preliminary reports of 2,818 doses administered yesterday, as well as 1,146 administered on prior days that had not been recorded.

All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 210,975 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 494, which is 17 more than yesterday. There are 107 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is five more than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (3), Benton (18), Clackamas (139), Clatsop (3), Columbia (3), Coos (17), Crook (22), Curry (2), Deschutes (69), Douglas (21), Harney (1), Hood River (5), Jackson (69), Jefferson (10), Josephine (26), Klamath (10), Lake (2), Lane (65), Lincoln (6), Linn (42), Malheur (16), Marion (99), Morrow (6), Multnomah (163), Polk (28), Sherman (1), Tillamook (4), Umatilla (75), Union (3), Wallowa (2), Wasco (6), Washington (100) and Yamhill (23).

Oregon’s 1,507th COVID-19 death is an 87-year-old man in Tillamook County who tested positive on Dec. 28 and died on Jan. 1 at his residence. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,508th COVID-19 death is a 54-year-old man in Clackamas County who tested positive on Nov. 29 and died on Dec. 24 at Oregon Health & Science University Hospital. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,509th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old man in Clackamas County who died on Dec. 28 at Providence St. Vincent Medical Center. The death certificate listed COVID-19 disease or SARS-CoV-2 as a cause of death or a significant condition contributing to death. He had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,510th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Columbia County who tested positive on Dec. 15 and died on Dec. 31 at Legacy Good Samaritan Medical Center. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,511st COVID-19 death is a 49-year-old man in Coos County who tested positive on Dec. 30 and died on Jan. 4 at Bay Area Hospital. He had underlying conditions. (more…)

The ebb and flow of the sea…you can set your watch to it…

The waves give us sand…and the waves take it away….

WHERE DID ALL THE SAND GO?

Newport Surfrider will present it’s virtual January Chapter meeting on Thursday, January 14th at 6:30 pm. This will be a discussion of how and why beaches change with the movement of sand and how this affects beach use. The panel includes Jonathan Allan, Coastal Geomorphologist for the state of Oregon, and Jay Senewald, Ocean Shore Coordinator for Oregon Parks and Recreation.

Jonathan will give an overview of the coastal processes that form our beaches, and specifically, how and why Agate Beach has changed over the last few years.

Jay will explain the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department’s responsibility for managing our ocean shore and how Oregon Administrative Rules guide the agency including the need for permits for shoreline alterations and the process for public participation.

There will be plenty of time for questions after the presentations. For free tickets register at:

sand-movement.eventbrite.com.

 

First sign of Spring in Lincoln City!!

Shannon Loch was out at Connie Hansen Gardens and spotted this eager sweet flower to ring in Spring.  Well, it’s hardly January and we’re getting our first glimpse of Spring, even if we’re several months away.  Hope springs eternal!!

So you might be interested in the future of Newport?

CITY OF NEWPORT
SEEKING INTERESTED CITIZENS
TO FILL PLANNING COMMISSION VACANCY

The Newport City Council is accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the Planning Commission. The City of Newport’s Planning Commission is authorized by ORS 227.020 (Oregon Revised Statutes) and Section 2.05.003 of the City’s Municipal Code. The Planning Commission is comprised of seven appointed members, who are city volunteers serving three-year terms. The Planning Commission makes decisions directly on various land use issues as well as provides recommendations to the City Council on land use matters.

The Planning Commission meets on the second and fourth Mondays of each month. If this falls on a holiday, the meeting is moved to Tuesday. Work sessions are typically held at 6:00 P.M., with regular sessions starting at 7:00 P.M. Currently, these meetings are being held virtually.

Volunteer applications are available on the city’s website at www.newportoregon.gov, under the “committees” link, or by calling Peggy Hawker, at 541.574.0613. Deadline for applications is 5:00 P.M., Friday, January 22, 2021. Council will review the applications, and candidates will be interviewed at an upcoming City Council meeting, at which an appointment may be made.

CITY OF NEWPORT ANNOUNCES VACANCY ON THE 60+ ADVISORY COMMITTEE

Newport City Hall

CITY OF NEWPORT ANNOUNCES VACANCY ON THE 60+ ADVISORY COMMITTEE

The City of Newport is seeking applications from citizens interested in serving on the 60+ Advisory Committee. The 60+ Advisory Committee consists of seven members who serve two-year terms. The appointee will fill a vacant term that expires on December 31, 2021.

The 60+ Advisory Committee is responsible for studying and making recommendations to the City Council regarding the economics, physical condition, operation, maintenance, development, use, regulation, and expansion of the 60+ Activity Center. The Committee is responsible for the acquisition and promotion of programs for seniors in the City of Newport. The Committee meets on the fourth Monday of every month at 2:30 P.M., at the 60+ Activity Center.

Anyone interested in serving on this committee should apply using the city’s committee application that is found on the city website at www.newportoregon.gov; click on “City;” then on “Committees;” and then on “Application for Committee/Commission.” The completed form can be submitted electronically. Paper copies of the committee application form can also be obtained by contacting Peggy Hawker, at p.hawker@newportoregon.gov, or by telephone at 541.574.0613. The application deadline is January 22, 2021.

The 60+ Advisory Committee will interview interested volunteers its next meeting, and forward a recommendation to the Mayor for formal appointment at a subsequent City Council meeting.

The nature of the Covid-19 Virus is finally revealed….

What’s the best way to build immunity against COVID-19?

Some people may be wondering if getting a COVID-19 vaccine is as effective at building immunity as getting infected by the virus. The answer is that the body will build immunity to COVID-19 in a different way with the vaccine than through infection.

However, infection has the potential to lead to serious symptoms, which may prove to be deadly. Natural immunity, which is gained from having an infection, may not even last very long. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), natural immunity also varies from person to person and there is real potential for re-infection.    

Vaccination is the best tool we have to help us end the COVID-19 pandemic in Oregon and across the globe. The mRNA vaccines developed by Pfizer and Moderna give our cells instructions for how to make a harmless protein that is unique to the virus. Our bodies recognize that the protein should not be there and build T-lymphocytes and B-lymphocytes that will remember how to fight the virus that causes COVID-19 if we are infected in the future.

By getting vaccinated, wearing masks, washing our hands, staying physically distant and avoiding large indoor gatherings, we can help stop the spread of COVID-19. If enough of us get vaccinated, we can achieve community immunity and the virus will not spread so quickly.  

Learn more at Oregon Health Authority’s COVID-19 Vaccine page in English or Spanish.

Covid-19 Virus has not given up. It’s still a deadly invader….

Oregon reports 731 new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases, 6 new deaths

PORTLAND, Ore. — COVID-19 has claimed six more lives in Oregon, raising the state’s death toll to 1,506, the Oregon Health Authority reported.

Oregon Health Authority reported 731 new confirmed and presumptive cases of COVID-19 as of today, bringing the state total to 118,456.

Vaccinations in Oregon

Today, OHA recorded 2,550 doses of vaccine administered – including nine second doses – raising the state’s total number of doses administered to 51,275. This figure is based on preliminary reports of 1,663 doses administered yesterday, as well as 887 administered on prior days that had not been recorded.

All vaccinations occurred at Oregon hospitals, long-term care facilities, emergency medical service (EMS) agencies, urgent care facilities and Local Public Health Authorities (LPHAs).

To date, 190,500 doses of vaccine have been delivered to sites across Oregon.

COVID-19 hospitalizations

The number of hospitalized patients with COVID-19 across Oregon is 477, which is six fewer than yesterday. There are 102 COVID-19 patients in intensive care unit (ICU) beds, which is seven fewer than yesterday.

The total number of patients in hospital beds may fluctuate between report times. The numbers do not reflect admissions per day, nor the length of hospital stay. Staffing limitations are not captured in this data and may further limit bed capacity.

More information about hospital capacity can be found here.

Cases and deaths

The new confirmed and presumptive COVID-19 cases reported today are in the following counties: Baker (10), Clackamas (67), Clatsop (2), Columbia (10), Coos (20), Curry (2), Deschutes (45), Douglas (14), Harney (2), Jackson (40), Jefferson (6), Josephine (16), Klamath (31), Lake (1), Lane (62), Lincoln (4), Linn (10), Marion (79), Morrow (4), Multnomah (95), Polk (16), Tillamook (2), Umatilla (24), Union (4), Wasco (2), Washington (141) Yamhill (22).

Oregon’s 1,501st COVID-19 death is an 83-year-old woman in Lane County who tested positive on Dec. 23 and died on Jan. 1 at PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center at Riverbend. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,502nd COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Linn County who tested positive on Dec.18 and died on Dec.18 at Salem Hospital. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,503rd COVID-19 death is a 90-year-old woman in Multnomah County who tested positive on Dec. 22 and died on Dec. 22 at Adventist Hospital. She had underlying conditions.

Oregon’s 1,504th COVID-19 death is a 47-year-old man in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Jan. 3 at Legacy Emanuel Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,505th COVID-19 death is an 81-year-old woman in Washington County who tested positive on Dec. 18 and died on Jan. 2 at Legacy Meridian Park Medical Center. Presence of underlying conditions is being confirmed.

Oregon’s 1,506th COVID-19 death is a 92-year-old woman in Coos County who tested positive on Dec. 24 and died on Jan. 1 at her residence. She had underlying conditions.

Newport Library isn’t letting Covid-19 stop education…

Newport Library

1: It’s (Finally) 2021 Reading Challenge
The It’s (Finally) 2021 Reading Challenge encourages you to switch up your usual reading habits and explore what the Library has to offer. After you’ve read a book, eBook, or Audiobook in each of the first 33 categories, turn in a reading challenge ticket for prizes and a chance to win the Grand Prize Drawing. There are bonus categories that can earn you extra entries in the Grand Prize Drawing too! The It’s (Finally) 2021 Reading Challenge will take place from January 1, 2021-December 31, 2021. The It’s (Finally) 2021 Reading Challenge log and information will become available on Tuesday, December 8 during Library Take-Out hours.

2: Book Bingo
Book Bingo is happening at the library! Anyone ages 18 and under can participate. Just pick up a bingo card during Library Take Out hours and complete it by May 31, 2021 for a prize!

3: STEAM Take Away Kits
The Newport Public Library is offering STEAM inspired takeaway activity to pick up during library take out hours: 10 pm to 5:30 pm Tuesdays and Thursdays! These kits are best for ages 11 and under.

4: Teen Take Away
The Newport Public Library is offering take away kits for teens ages 12-18! These kits will have a STEAM inspired activity. They can be picked up in January during library take out hours: 10 pm to 5:30 pm Tuesdays and Thursdays.

5: Teen Zoom Party
There’s an artsy event happening almost at the Newport Public Library! Join us for Newport Library’s monthly Teen Zoom Party on January 13th starting at 3:00 and ending by 4:00 p.m. Students, grades 6 – 12, are invited to a FREE Pictionary event via Zoom!

6: The Reading Circle
Monthly meetings are now held via Zoom on the second Tuesday of the month at 12 pm. The Newport Library Reading Circle will meet on Tuesday, January 12 at 12:00 p.m. via zoom to discuss books narrated by animals. The Reading Circle is free and open to the public. The Zoom meeting information can be found on our website at: http://ow.ly/Mnf950AT08z

6: Library Wi-Fi
Thanks to our amazing IT Department, we have boosted our Wi-Fi! Wi-Fi is available from 8 am – 5:30 pm Mondays through Fridays in the library parking lots for FREE. Please share this announcement with students and others who may not have Wi-Fi at home!

7: Newport Library Mobile Hotspots
Want to know what’s “Hot” at the Newport Public Library? Wi-Fi mobile HOTSPOTS are available for check-out to adult Newport Public Library cardholders in good standing. We have seven hotspots available to check out for 2 weeks. If you know someone who doesn’t have Internet access, please share this with them. Please give us a call at 541-265-2153 or check out our library website for more information: http://ow.ly/fujo50BRkWD

Wolves are de-listed, “sort of….”

North American Wolf

ODFW now managing wolves statewide after wolf delisting from federal Endangered Species List

SALEM, Ore.—Today, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service formally removed most gray wolves in the lower 48 from the Endangered Species List, which turns management over to state fish and wildlife agencies including ODFW.

In Oregon, wolves west of Highways 395-78-95 had remained on the federal ESA when the area east of this boundary was delisted in 2011.

While U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service was the lead agency in the western two thirds of the state, ODFW has always played a significant role in wolf conservation and management statewide since wolves began to re-establish themselves in Oregon in the 2000s.

Wolves in Oregon remain protected under the state’s Oregon Wolf Conservation and Management Plan (Plan). The Plan is the product of enormous public, stakeholder, and scientific input and has already led to substantial conservation accomplishments since it was first adopted in 2005.

Oregon’s known wolf count has grown from 14 wolves in 2009 to 158 at the end of 2019. The 2020 count is happening now and updated numbers will be available in Spring 2021. (more…)

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