WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 


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The Unexpected Elephant MEANS BUSINESS!! ONE DAY ONLY!!

25% OFF EVERYTHING!!!
 
The Unexpected Elephant fundraising resale: See slideshow of a few items for sale by clicking here! We have rows of tables that display a wealth of treasures to purchase: jewelry, glass, crystal, china, kitchenware, dolls, toys, stuffed animals, furniture, rugs, collectibles, knickknacks, artwork, framed art, picture frames, lamps, books, dvds, etc. NEW ITEMS ARE ADDED TO EACH SALE. ONE day only – Saturday, July 20th, from 10am to 2pm. Free admission.

The Unexpected Elephant fundraiser occurs several times a year and benefits South Lincoln Resources, Waldport Food Share and Adventist Clothing Share.

When: Saturday, July 20th, from 10am to 2pm

Where: South Lincoln Resources, 3710 Crestline Dr, Waldport (1 block south of Dahl Dr)

Info: 541-563-3710

Merkley, Joined by Wyden, Returns to Border with Delegation of Senate Democrats

Senators Ron Wyden and Jeff Merkley

Merkley, Joined by Wyden, Returns to Border with Delegation of Senate Democrats 

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Thirteen months after his first trip to McAllen, Texas pushed the issue of family separation to the top of the national debate, Oregon’s Senator Jeff Merkley returned to Texas today with a delegation of 12 Senate Democrats. He was joined by his fellow Oregon Senator, Ron Wyden.

Merkley helped lead the Senate Democrats’ on-the-ground mission to investigate the Trump policies that have created overcrowding and suffering, as Senate Democrats responded to the latest Trump administration crisis at the border. Last week, Merkley led the introduction of the Stop Cruelty to Migrant Children Act, legislation co-sponsored by 40 Senate Democrats—including Wyden—that would end the Trump administration’s cruelty at the border.

“No American wants innocent children to suffer—especially not on America’s watch, with America’s taxdollars,” Merkley said. “The Trump administration has pursued a deliberate strategy of inflicting trauma on children to deter people seeking asylum from coming to our borders. This is shameful and wrong, and demands that we stand up against it in outrage. It’s possible to create an immigration system that is fair and gives all families the opportunities to full their potential and contribute to society. That’s why Senate Democrats are here today, and that’s why we will keep fighting to end cruelty to migrant children and treat everyone within our borders with decency and respect.”

“Once again, today’s visit illustrated that zero tolerance makes zero sense and has zero connection to American values. I saw conditions that no child, no family and no person should ever have to live,” Wyden said. “Donald Trump is manufacturing a humanitarian crisis at our border with cruel policies that are creating more problems and oppressive conditions. The public has a right to know the atrocities taking place. What we need now is transparency and accountability, and that’s why we were here today.”

On today’s trip, the delegation visited Border Patrol holding and processing centers along the border, as well as a Catholic respite center that is providing aid to asylum seekers. They also met with local NGOs who have been advocating for safer conditions and providing assistance and legal aid to families fleeing persecution.

The Stop Cruelty to Migrant Children Act would create clear, non-negotiable standards for the treatment of children in America’s care, including:

  • Ending family separations except when authorized by a state court or child welfare agency, or when Customs and Border Protection and an independent child welfare specialist agree that a child is a trafficking victim, is not the child of an accompanying adult, or is in danger of abuse or neglect;
  • Setting minimum health and safety standards for children and families in Border Patrol Stations.

o   The bill requires access to hygiene products including toothbrushes, diapers, soap and showers, regular nutritious meals, and a prompt medical assessment by trained medical providers.

  • Requiring children receive three meals a day that meet USDA nutrition standards.
  • Ending for-profit contractors from operating new Office of Refugee Resettlement (ORR) standard shelters or influx facilities.

o   The bill ensures that temporary influx facilities are state-licensed, meet Flores standards, and are not used to house children indefinitely.

Expanding alternatives to detention and the successful Family Case Management Program.

  • Removing roadblocks to placing unaccompanied children with sponsors by lowering case manager caseloads, mandating lower staffing ratios, and ending the information sharing agreement between ORR and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE).

o   These provisions would ensure that children are moved out of detention centers and into community-based settings—usually, sponsored by family members—as soon as possible.

  • Ensuring unaccompanied children have access to legal counsel and continue to be placed in a non-adversarial setting for their initial asylum case review.

Additionally, the legislation would provide resources to non-profit centers that are helping to provide humanitarian assistance, and improve public oversight of the conditions children are being held in by allowing members of Congress and their staff, along with credentialed press (without cameras), to visit any facility with 24 hours’ notice.

In June 2018, Merkley set off a national firestorm when he went to the border to personally investigate the administration’s child separation policy and was turned away from a children’s detention center in Brownsville, Texas. Merkley pressured the Trump administration to formally end their cruel policy of separating children from their parents, but the administration has been determined to keep pursuing policies that inflict trauma on children and families fleeing persecution abroad—seen most recently in the news reports of children being detained in squalid conditions near the border and the ‘metering’ policies that have blockaded families, like Valeria and Oscar Martinez Ramirez, from legally applying for asylum at American ports of entry.

Traffic Alert: Hwy 101 in Newport from NW 48 to NW 68th July 22-26, July 29 -31

Traffic disruption for last half of July

Due to paving on Highway 101, there will be lane shifts and lane closures, between NW 68th and NW 48th Streets, during the week of July 22 through July 26, 2019, and the following Monday through Wednesday, July 29 through July 31.

Flaggers will direct traffic during highway lane closures at night.

Access to NW 58th and NW 60th Streets, and to Schooner Landing and Pacific Shores Motor Coach Resort, will be restricted intermittently for paving activities.

Thank you for your patience.

Toledo City Manager Craig Martin is retiring by September 30th

After about three years at the helm as City Manager of Toledo, Craig Martin has announced that he’s retiring by the end of September, at the latest. Martin says he’ll be leaving the city and plans to retire, perhaps up the Siletz River. The city is now shopping in earnest for a new city manager to take over the reins of the city.

Martin came to Toledo from a similar position in Sweet Home, a town with about five times as many citizens as Toledo. Martin has been trying to maneuver Toledo toward better funded sewer and water systems. At this week’s Toledo City Council meeting the council agreed to reduce taxes for street lights from $7.50 a month down to $2.50 and apply the five dollar difference to the city’s sewer processing facilities. The city has been under pressure from state authorities to improve the quality of the finished product coming out of the plant. Toledo agreed in mid-June to provide Dahl Disposal with a 2.5% increase for garbage and recycling services.

Newport Cider Festival, October 4-5

Newport Cider Festival
Newport Chamber of Commerce

The Greater Newport Chamber of Commerce (GNCC) is seeking community partners to support the first Newport Cider Festival, to be held on October 4-5.

This two-day event will draw tourism to Newport after the end of busy summer months. Live music, artisans, pacific northwest ciders, craft brews, and food trucks will be the highlight of this harvest-themed festival, located at the Newport National Guard Armory at 541 SW Coast Highway.

Children are welcome at the Kidz Zone where family-friendly activities will be offered. Festival hours are 11 a.m.- 9 p.m. on Friday, October 4, and 12 p.m. – 9 p.m. on Saturday, October 5. Live entertainment–including cider pressing, food preservation, and kombucha brewing–will be held Friday 5 p.m.- 9 p.m. and Saturday from 2 p.m.- 8 p.m. Tickets are $12 per adult and $8 per child with online e-tickets ($16 per adult and $10 per child at the door).

The GNCC is offering the community an opportunity to become an inaugural sponsor and the first on board to launch this event. Sponsorship includes exposure for businesses, including broad internet, website and social media recognition, booth space at the event, inclusion in media campaigns, event tickets, onsite signage and more.

To learn more about sponsorship opportunities or to purchase tickets, visit www.newportchamber.org/newport-cider-festival or call the GNCC at (541) 265-8801.

Unexpected Elephant Sale to Benefit the Community

25% OFF EVERYTHING!!!

The Unexpected Elephant fundraising resale: See slideshow of a few items for sale at southlincolnresources.org/ue.htm. We have rows of tables that display a wealth of treasures to purchase: jewelry, glass, crystal, china, kitchenware, dolls, toys, stuffed animals, furniture, rugs, collectibles, knickknacks, artwork, framed art, picture frames, lamps, books, dvds, etc. NEW ITEMS ARE ADDED TO EACH SALE. ONE day only – Saturday, July 20th, from 10am to 2pm. Free admission.

The Unexpected Elephant fundraiser occurs several times a year and benefits South Lincoln Resources, Waldport Food Share and Adventist Clothing Share.

When: Saturday, July 20th, from 10am to 2pm
Where: South Lincoln Resources, 3710 Crestline Dr, Waldport (1 block south of Dahl Dr)
Info: 541-563-3710

Lincoln City High Speed Pursuit: “LCPD gets their man…”

Glenn Thompson
Reckless Driving
Reckless Endangering
Attempting to Elude
$80,000 Bail

Lincoln City Police arrest 30-year-old Glenn L. Thompson of Salem, Oregon after he led them on a high speed vehicle pursuit.

Wednesday evening an LC Police Officer attempted to conduct a traffic stop on a black BMW on Hwy 101 near the clover-leaf of Hwy 18 for a traffic violation. The BMW driver failed to stop and sped away, with the police officer in pursuit. A Lincoln County Sheriff Deputy, who was in the area, joined in the pursuit. The fleeing vehicle turned onto North Bank Road and eventually made its way back to HWY 18 at the Rose Lodge Store. It then turned westbound on Hwy 18 heading towards Lincoln City. While on Hwy 18 the driver of the BMW drove into the on-coming lane of traffic causing other vehicles to take evasive action and at times was driving over 100 miles per hour.

Additional LC Police Officers and an Oregon State Police Trooper responded to assist, with one Lincoln City officer stopping in the area of HWY 101 near the Neotsu Post Office to set up a “Stop Stick” deployment. As the suspect vehicle traveled through that area the officer’s stop sticks were able to deflate 3 out of the 4 tires. None-the-less the pursuit continued into Lincoln City as the tires on the suspect vehicled continued to go flat. With three flat tires the driver finely stopped his vehicle on Highway 101 directly in front of TLC Credit Union, ending the pursuit.

A felony traffic stop was conducted and the driver was taken into custody. He was alone in the car.  The driver, identified as 30-year-old Glenn L. Thompson, was initially transported to the Lincoln City Police Department and later transported to the Lincoln County Jail where he was lodged on charges of Felony Elude, Reckless Driving and Reckless Endangering. Thompson was also subsequently cited for Driving on a suspended license.

The Lincoln City Police would like to thank the Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office and the Oregon State Police for their assistance with this incident and officers were thankful there were no injuries or other property damage during the pursuit. 

Senator Jeff Merkley says: Check your boat registrations!!!


The Oregon State Marine Board, in partnership with 32 county sheriff’s offices and the Oregon State Police, will be out in force August 3-4, looking for expired boat registrations as part of “Operation Ship Shape.”

“We want boaters to look at their boat’s decals, the registration numbers, and their registration card and make sure they’re up-to-date,” says Randy Henry, Boating Safety Program Manager for the Marine Board. “Make sure you’ve renewed your registration, and make sure you’ve put the decal on your boat, or you could face a $265 citation.”

The Marine Board is funded by registration, title fees and marine fuel taxes paid by motorized boaters. No lottery, general fund tax dollars or local facility parking fees are used to fund agency programs. These fees go back to boaters in the form of boat ramps, docks, trailered parking spaces, restrooms, construction and maintenance, and for boating safety -marine law enforcement services.

“Any boat that is powered by a motor – electric, gas, diesel or steam, and all sailboats 12 feet and longer -must be currently registered when on the water, even when docked or moored,” said Henry. This includes inflatable rafts with an electric motor, even a standup paddleboard or float tube with an electric motor. Henry added, “Each boat registration brings in additional funds from motorboat fuel tax and federal boating dollars. Registering a 16-foot boat provides $77 of funding, but results in additional matching funds of nearly $190, so that $77 registration fee results in $267 of revenue available to fund facilities and marine enforcement.”

Motorboat registrations are $4.50 per foot, rounded up, plus $5 which fund invasive species inspection stations. Registration fees will increase to $5.95 per foot, plus $5 in 2020, so Henry suggests that if your boat registration lapsed, register now at the current fee, which is valid for two calendar years.

Boaters can renew their boat registration online at www.boatoregon.com/store, or can visit their local registration agent. Boaters can print off a temporary permit after successfully completing their transaction online or will be issued a temporary permit through an agent for an additional fee. If you need assistance renewing online, please contact the Marine Board at marine.board@oregon.gov or 503-378-8587.

For a list of registration agents, visit http://www.oregon.gov/osmb/title-registration/Pages/Where-to-Register.aspx.

Yachats Quilter To Be Featured at Show

Yachats Quilter To Be Featured at Show

Nan Scott of Yachats, has been selected as Featured Quilter for the 2019 quilt show sponsored by the Oregon Coastal Quilters Guild (OCQG) August 2 and 3 at the Newport Recreation Center, 225 Avery Street in Newport. Show hours will be 9-5 on Friday, August 2 and 9-4 on Saturday, August 3.

Scott learned to sew when her grandmother taught her how to use a treadle machine. Her first attempt was probably an apron for home economics class. Then she “graduated” to her mother’s 1930s Singer Featherweight. It was well-used, and most of the enamel coating had chipped off, so Nan wore rubber-soled shoes to prevent getting shocked!

The incentive to sew was diminished though, because her family was living in Taiwan. If Nan wanted a dress for a party, she could take a picture from a catalog to a local dressmaker and get a duplicate tailored to fit for about $3 US dollars.

Scott became interested in quilting in the mid-1980s when several of her Oregon State University colleagues would gather to tie baby and thrift shop quilts. However, a real passion for the creative art of quilting had to wait until retirement in 2003.

OCQG member Gladys Schoonover invited Nan to a meeting in 2004. Gladys’ encouragement and sense of humor brought quilting alive. Since then, guild workshops, friendship groups, and mentors have broadened Nan’s perspective and challenged her to try new directions. Many of her quilts have an Asian theme that stems from the love and respect of the Chinese people engendered when she lived in China and Taiwan.

Since joining OCQG, Nan has built the guild’s original website and served as workshop chair, newsletter editor, president, block of the month coordinator, membership chair, and quilt show co-chair. Nan and several other members started an annual retreat, currently held at the Oregon Garden. Nan says, “Quilters are such compassionate, giving people who will be there for you in joyful times and in heartache. For me, that is the true heart of quilting.”

The annual quilt show, “Quilts by the Sea,” is organized by OCQG. This year’s event will feature about 300 quilts, including the 2019 guild challenge of medallions for future veterans’ quilts.

Other quilt show features include a vendor mall, members’ boutique, displays of guild activities, and a children’s corner. A two-day silent auction of small quilts will be conducted; half the proceeds of the auction will be donated to a local charity. The 4-H Coastal Ranchers will offer snacks and light lunches during the show.

The guild has more than 200 members throughout Lincoln County and beyond. Additional information about the show and the guild is on their website, www.oregoncoastalquilters.org.

Wooden Boat Show coming up in Toledo!!


Port of Toledo will be making a splash at its 15th Annual Wooden Boat Show on August 17 and 18, and is pleased to announce the release of this year’s event poster. The poster features the show’s most popular event, the Georgia Pacific Containerboard Boat Contest. This poster is the eleventh Wooden Boat Show poster created by Newport artist Travis Leonard and continues the Port of Toledo’s Wooden Boat Show’s tradition of creating unique collectable posters. The poster is a mosaic of scenes from previous year’s Georgia Pacific Containerboard Boat Races and was inspired by photos of previous year’s participants having fun as they test their cardboard vessel design and building skills on Depot Slough. Leonard drew the panels for the poster separately referencing photos from previous containerboard events. The drawings were then transferred onto drafting vellum and inked using a brush. The inked drawings were scanned and then digital tools were used to color and design the final poster.

Willie Worman of Georgia Pacific coordinates the event and encourages everyone to participate. He says “if you don’t build a boat for this crazy race you are missing out”. The GP Containerboard Boat Race will be on Saturday, August 17, starting at 2:00 pm. If you are interested in building a boat, contact Worman by email at: William.worman@gapac.com, or go to the Port’s website: https://www.portoftoledo.org/containerboard-boat-contest

The Port of Toledo Wooden Boat Show is a free, family event, celebrating Toledo’s maritime heritage. There is something for everyone: boat building, live music, kids’ activities, food, boat rides, vendors and lots more. Live music on both days of the festival features local musicians with Curtis Salgado headlining Saturday, after the containerboard boat races. The festival is located at the Port’s Marina and Waterfront Park at 127 NW A Street, Toledo. Hours are Saturday, August 17, from 10 am to 6 pm and Sunday, August 18, 10 am to 4 pm.

The Port would like to thank the major sponsors of the event: Georgia Pacific, NW Natural, Oregon Coast Bank, FBB Federal Relations, Toledo Ace Hardware, Dahl Disposal Service, Englund Marine, Fishpeople Seafood, Samaritan Health Services, Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center, Siletz Boat Works, Rogue and Siletz River Lumber.

Individual Wooden Boat Show posters or a full set of 15 posters are available to purchase at the Port’s Office or at the Port’s booth at the Wooden Boat Show. To find out more about the event please go to https://www.portoftoledo.org/wooden-boat-show or call 541-336-5207

Oregon Coast Aquarium To the Rescue….again!

The Oregon Coast Aquarium rehabilitated and released a young giant Pacific octopus that was caught in a crab trap back in March.

The 22 pound female octopus was brought to the Aquarium by a crab fisherman on March 26 in an underweight condition with open wounds on her arms. Aquarium staff transferred the octopus to a quarantine area behind-the-scenes, where they spent the past few months treating the cuts and hand-feeding the invertebrate crab to help it gain weight.

Hand feeding the octopus to nourish it back to health. OCA photo

Once the octopus began feeding consistently, staff decided that the octopus’s best chances for survival would be back in the wild.

Within a half hour of receiving the release permit from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, Oregon Coast Aquarium Octopus Specialist, Lance Hayes, transferred the octopus to the Aquarium dive vessel, Gracie Lynn, for release offshore at South Reef, just south of Newport

“We typically release our Giant Pacific Octopuses offshore back into their natural habitat whenever possible,” said Hayes. “This way there is minimal acclimation to their surroundings, helps eliminate the predation they would encounter in shallower waters, and gives them a better chance to meet a mate and have baby octos for us for the future.”

Once staff identified a location with ample rocky habitat by sonar, Hayes carefully retrieved the octopus from an aerated cooler filled with water and lowered the octopus into the water. She gently left the net and sunk into the ocean depths with arms outstretched.

Octopus release video click here.

The Oregon Coast Aquarium receives octopuses from a variety of sources, typically as donations from fisherman after being caught as bycatch and sometimes through collection with the appropriate state and federal permits.

Depending on capacity and the octopus’s behavior, the Aquarium will either release the animal after rehabilitation or show the animal in an exhibit for guests to see for some time before eventual release. The goal is always to allow the octopuses to reproduce in the wild before they reach senescence—the end of an octopus’s life cycle.

Aquarium visitors have the opportunity to learn about, meet and get hands-on with one of these unique and curious invertebrates on a Giant Pacific Octopus Encounter. Octopus Encounters can be reserved online every Monday, Wednesday and Saturday at 2 pm at www.aquarium.org.

The Oregon Coast Aquarium creates unique and engaging experiences that connect you to the Oregon Coast and inspire ocean conservation. An accredited Association of Zoos & Aquariums institution, this 501(c)3 non-profit organization is ranked as one of the top 10 aquariums in the U.S.

Visit us at 2820 S.E. Ferry Slip Rd., Newport, OR. www.aquarium.org, 541-867-3474. Follow us on Facebook.com/OregonCoastAquarium, or Twitter.com/OrCoastAquarium for the latest updates.

All photos and videos courtesy Oregon Coast Aquarium. Their website is full of opportunities to see the great work the OCA performs everyday.

Grillin’ State Rep. David Gomberg in Lincoln City

Rep. David Gomberg and wife Susan

Your chance to ‘grill Gomberg!

State Rep. David Gomberg shares news from the legislative session over cheeseburgers fresh from the grill, at OCCC in Lincoln City on Thursday, July 25.
What does the 2019 Legislative Session mean for your business?
On Thursday afternoon, July 25, get caught up with an update from Rep. David Gomberg (D-Otis), at this casual afternoon gathering at the SBDC office at Oregon Coast Community College in Lincoln City.
It’s a chance to ask questions of Rep. Gomberg over a tasty cheeseburger ($6, including soda and chips). The event is free of charge for anyone not eating. 
Rep. Gomberg will arrive at 3 p.m. and the event lasts til 5 p.m. It will be held at the Small Business Development Center office at Oregon Coast Community College’s North County Center in Lincoln City, at 3788 SE High School Drive.

Staff will only prepare cheeseburgers for those who register in advance, so please call 541-994-4166 or email Shirley Hill, OCCC’s North County Coordinator, at Shirley.hill@oregoncoastcc.org, to confirm attendance. Payment accepted at the door.

The Small Business Development Center offers free, confidential, one-on-one business advising to anyone who owns a business or is considering launching one in Lincoln County. To learn more or sign up for advising, visit www.oregoncoastbusiness.com.

Want a pretty city! Get on the Newport’s Planning Commission

CITY OF NEWPORT
SEEKING INTERESTED CITIZENS
TO FILL PLANNING COMMISSION VACANCY

The Newport City Council is accepting applications to fill a vacancy on the Planning Commission. The City of Newport’s Planning Commission is authorized by ORS 227.020 (Oregon Revised Statutes) and Section 2.05.003 of the City’s Municipal Code. The Planning Commission is comprised of seven appointed members who are city volunteers. The Planning Commission makes decisions directly on various land use issues as well as provides recommendations to the City Council on land use matters.

The Planning Commission meets on the second and fourth Mondays of each month. If this falls on a holiday, the meeting is moved to Tuesday. Work sessions are typically held at 6:00 P.M. in Conference Room A of the Newport City Hall. The regular sessions are typically held at 7:00 P.M. in the Council Chambers.

Volunteer applications are available on the city’s website at www.newportoregon.gov, under the “committees” link, or by calling Peggy Hawker, at 541.574.0613. Deadline for applications is 5:00 P.M., Friday, July 26, 2019. Council will review the applications, and candidates will be interviewed at the August 5, 2019 City Council meeting, at which an appointment may be made.

Protecting college students from “Wannabee cops on college campuses”

Kaylee Sawyer murdered July 26th while she walked from her apartment to COCC

Governor Kate Brown to Sign Kaylee’s Law in Bend

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown will sign SB 576 into law tomorrow, Thursday July 18 at the Deschutes County District Attorney’s Office. Also known as Kaylee’s Law, the legislation was named for Kaylee Sawyer, who was killed by a campus security officer in 2016. Her family proposed the legislation, which was co-sponsored by 24 legislators.

“While this legislation focuses on specific scenarios, at its heart, it is about making our campuses safer for our students. Parents send their children off to college with high hopes for good grades, great friends, and broadened horizons. But they never expect to lose a child,” said Governor Brown. “Kaylee Sawyer’s death was a tragedy, and we want to make sure that this never happens to a promising young Oregonian again.”

Governor Brown will be joined at the event by local legislators and community members.

Chinook and Coho Salmon open a whole new door!

Habitat Restoration Work What Benefits Can We Expect for Salmon and Watersheds?

Thursday, August 1st 2019 6:30 PM
Newport Visual Arts Center

Restoration in the Siletz River Basin, which supports one of the most diverse assemblages of fish species on the Oregon Coast and the fishers who seek them year-round, is about to see the benefits of a major culvert replacement project. Located on North Creek—a tributary to Drift Creek—this project will make over 13 miles of high quality habitat within the Siuslaw National Forest fully accessible to Chinook and coho salmon, steelhead, coastal cutthroat trout, lamprey, freshwater mussels, and other aquatic organisms for the first time in 62 years. At the August 1st MCWC Community Meeting—beginning at 6:30 PM at the Newport Visual Arts Center—Council Coordinator, Evan Hayduk, will provide an update on the ongoing project, and provide context to one of the biggest restoration projects completed during his three year tenure.

Restoration work is at times as much of an art as it is a science, and is never finished until natural processes are restored. Culvert replacements like that at North Creek are just one of a suite of actions the MidCoast Watersheds Council and partners take on the ground to restore habitat and watershed scale processes, supporting salmon and everything else that depend on them. Other actions may include large wood placements, dike removal, invasive species management, and riparian planting and fencing. It takes understanding site characteristics and working in partnership with the landwoners, other organizations, and agencies to determine the right actions for any particular project and to see these tasks through.

Years after these exciting projects wrap up, MCWC continues monitoring them to ensure that the actions taken are working to achieve the desired goals. Evan’s presentation will shed light on the benefits expected or seen from various restoration projects, illustrating before and after conditions on the ground. Evan came to MCWC and Oregon’s Central Coast after almost a decade of work restoring riparian, wetland, sub-alpine, prairie, forested and oak savanna ecosystems in Washington state.

The presentation will begin at 6:30 PM in Room 205 on the upper floor of the Newport Visual Arts Center in Nye Beach, at 777 NW Beach Drive.

Refreshments will be provided. A MidCoast Watersheds Council Board meeting will follow the presentation with the following agenda: financial report, restoration report, technical team report, administrative committee report, and action items. We hope to see you on Thursday, August 1st!

Yachats Quilter to be featured at show!!

person

Yachats Quilter To Be Featured at Show

Nan Scott of Yachats, Oregon, has been selected as Featured Quilter for the 2019 quilt show sponsored by the Oregon Coastal Quilters Guild (OCQG) August 2 and 3 at the Newport Recreation Center, 225 Avery Street in Newport. Show hours will be 9-5 on Friday, August 2 and 9-4 on Saturday, August 3.

Scott learned to sew when her grandmother taught her how to use a treadle machine. Her first attempt was probably an apron for home economics class. Then she “graduated” to her mother’s 1930s Singer Featherweight. It was well-used, and most of the enamel coating had chipped off, so Nan wore rubber-soled shoes to prevent getting shocked!

The incentive to sew was diminished though, because her family was living in Taiwan. If Nan wanted a dress for a party, she could take a picture from a catalog to a local dressmaker and get a duplicate tailored to fit for about $3 US dollars.

Scott became interested in quilting in the mid-1980s when several of her Oregon State University colleagues would gather to tie baby and thrift shop quilts. However, a real passion for the creative art of quilting had to wait until retirement in 2003.

OCQG member Gladys Schoonover invited Nan to a meeting in 2004. Gladys’ encouragement and sense of humor brought quilting alive. Since then, guild workshops, friendship groups, and mentors have broadened Nan’s perspective and challenged her to try new directions. Many of her quilts have an Asian theme that stems from the love and respect of the Chinese people engendered when she lived in China and Taiwan.

Since joining OCQG, Nan has built the guild’s original website and served as workshop chair, newsletter editor, president, block of the month coordinator, membership chair, and quilt show co-chair. Nan and several other members started an annual retreat, currently held at the Oregon Garden. Nan says, “Quilters are such compassionate, giving people who will be there for you in joyful times and in heartache. For me, that is the true heart of quilting.”

The annual quilt show, “Quilts by the Sea,” is organized by OCQG. This year’s event will feature about 300 quilts, including the 2019 guild challenge of medallions for future veterans’ quilts.

Other quilt show features include a vendor mall, members’ boutique, displays of guild activities, and a children’s corner. A two-day silent auction of small quilts will be conducted; half the proceeds of the auction will be donated to a local charity. The 4-H Coastal Ranchers will offer snacks and light lunches during the show.

The guild has more than 200 members throughout Lincoln County and beyond. Additional information about the show and the guild is on their website, www.oregoncoastalquilters.org.

5.3 Richter earthquake rumbles 175 miles offshore from Reedsport

Quakes epicenter about 175 miles west of Reedsport.

A magnitude 5.3 earthquake struck off the Oregon coast Wednesday morning according to the USGS.

The 8am shaker was centered about 175 miles west of Reedsport, with litttle or no noticeable shaking on shore.

The epicenter of the quake was at a depth of nearly 9 miles inside the Blanco Fracture Zone, where earthquake activity is very common.

Seismologists say the frequent rumblings are not necessarily indicative that a larger earthquake is imminent along the nearby Cascadia Subduction Zone (CSZ).  However, the CSZ can produce huge tsunamis that can race ashore after the shoreline has fallen in elevation due to the “Big One.”  Geologists and Seismologists remind everyone that Coastal Oregon is ground zero for very substantial earthquake activity.

 

The last big Cascadia “event” was on January 26th, 1700.  A huge tsunami raced across the northern Pacific and swamped villages and towns along the eastern Japanese coast.  They called it the “Orphan Tsunami” because no one felt an earthquake that could have caused such a destructive wall of water. 

Ghost Forest on the NW Oregon Coast.
Wikipedia photo

Meanwhile, back on the northwest coast of the U.S. the beaches sank 10 to 20 feet, killing trees that grew along the western edges of near-shore forests.  The dead tree stumps are clearly visible during very low tides.  The Cascadia Subduction Zone has a habit of triggering such quakes every 250 to 350 years.  From 1700 to 2019 is well within the quake’s powerful reach, if not near the outer edge of the time intervals between such quakes.

 

 

 

 

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