WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 

 

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Medford area man accused of murdering his wife and their four children makes first court appearance

Jordan Criado

A Jackson County man accused of killing his wife and four children by stabbing them and then setting fire to their home made his first court appearance in circuit court. Jordan Criado sat motionless beside his attorney and stared at the floor through the entire proceeding which could lead to the death penalty for him, or life in prison without any chance of parole.

The story is in the Oregonian. Click here.

Animal Lover wins EOTM nod from Chamber!

Kim Rampley and Friend
Click picture to enlarge

Kim Rampley rings the Chamber’s Bell!

For most of us, once we arrive at work, we are dealing with creatures of a two-legged persuasion. For Kim Rampley, receptionist for Animal Medical Care, that may not always be the case. Many of the visitors to her reception area have four legs, a furry body, and a wet nose. Kim’s primary role at work is to be the “face” of Animal Medical Care. She efficiently checks in clients, often several at once, while at the same time, answers the telephone and provides support to the staff at the clinic. Kim is compassionate in her dealings with owners, whose “best friend” needs veterinary care, and makes certain that both owner and pet are reassured and prepared for their visit with the doctors. Her co-workers agree that she is an irreplaceable asset to the office, and that her problem-solving skills, good sense of humor and attention to detail are all characteristics that make their job much easier. No task is too great or too small; Kim will lend a hand wherever needed. Says her boss, “Kim is the definition of a complete employee…” which is why Kim Rampley has been named Employee of the Month for August.

If you wish to nominate an employee who exhibits characteristics that include Quality of Service, Friendliness, Role Model or Knowledge of the Area, download a form at www.newportchamber.org or send an email to Bobbi, (bobbi@newportchamber.org).

Annual Nisika Illahee Pow Wow, August 12-14, Siletz! Everyone is welcome!

The Siletz Confederated Tribes are celebrating their annual Nesika Illahee Pow-Wow this Friday, Saturday and Sunday at the Pauline Ricks Memorial Pow Wow Grounds, atop Government Hill in Siletz. It is an annual opportunity for Siletz tribal members to celebrate their past, their traditions and to honor their elders of today and those who have gone before. All people are warmly invited to come and witness the spectacle and pageantry of Siletz Tribal dance, singing and spiritual renewal.

It is by far one of the most colorful and photogenic events in the region, but those with cameras are cautioned to pay close attention to the tribal announcers as they designate specific ceremonies or dances when photos are NOT allowed. On occasion, an eagle feather may fall from a head dress or regalia whereupon all photography shall cease immediately until the feather is recovered. Again, pay very close attention to the announcer.

The celebration begins with the crowning of the 2011-2012 Siletz Royalty on Friday evening at 6 pm. At 7 pm the first Grand Entry will begin with a beautiful array of all styles of dancing including traditional male and female, fancy, feather, shawl, grass, jingle, Golden Age and children.

The public is invited to join in a very large inter-tribal dance which immediately follows the Grand Entry.

Saturday at 10 am, the Nisika Illahee Pow Wow Parade moves through downtown Siletz. The parade features Siletz Tribal royalty, drummers, dancers, horses and riders, vintage cars and floats. The parade is followed by another Grand Entry at 1 pm at the Pow Wow grounds.

Youth and teen dance competitions takes place in the afternoon. More competition dancing continues after 7 pm.

More than 60 vendors on the pow-wow grounds will offer a colorful kaleidoscope of food and Native American arts and crafts and jewelry. A free shuttle (your best bet) will run from various parking lots in Siletz to the pow-wow grounds. Watch for signs for pick-up points.

Admission is free to the pow pow. But they require no drugs or alcohol be in anyone’s possession.

Here’s a schedule of events:

FRIDAY, AUGUST 12TH:
Memorial/Giveaways – Noon – 6 p.m. (Contact Nick Sixkiller)
Presentation of Crowns – 6 p.m.
Grand Entry – 7 p.m.

SATURDAY, AUGUST 13TH:

Parade – 10 a.m.
Grand Entry – 1 p.m. & 7 p.m.

SUNDAY, AUGUST 14TH:
Grand Entry – Noon

For more information onthe Nisika Illahee Pow Wow, click here.

Getting a big charge, driving around Portland

Charging station

Are you thinking about the savings and the good green feelings you get when you drive an electric car? Well, you’ll be able to take that highly nuanced sense of well-being out for a spin if you stop by a big electric car charging station exhibition going on in Portland next Tuesday. There are plans to have electric charging stations up and down I-5 through the Willamette Valley, as well as along coastal Highway 101 eventually. The story is in the Oregonian. Click here.

Second Saturday Drum Stroll at Nye Beach is upon us!

Second Saturday Drum Stroll, Nye Beach

Second Saturday Stroll is August 13th in Nye Beach

It’s the second Saturday of the month tomorrow and that means it’s time to stroll on down to Nye Beach for the popular Second Saturday Stroll Drum Jam at Cafe Mundo, and special second Saturday events throughout the historic, oceanfront neighborhood.

The drum jam, featuring the Thunder & Lightness flute and percussion duo and members of the Newport Community Drum Circle ensemble, provides a celebratory beat from 2:00 to 4:00 p.m. in the Café Mundo courtyard at 209 NW Coast Street (541-574-8134). Other merchants will be offering” art shows and demonstrations, wine tastings, restaurant specials, and sales starting about 11 a.m. Chalk art and original street banners by local artists decorate the neighborhood, and street performers can often be found along Coast Street and in the area of the Nye Beach Turnaround.

The annual summer celebration sponsored by the Nye Beach Merchants Association concludes with one more Second Saturday Stroll on September 10.

Toledo Wooden Boat Show coming around the bend…

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The 7th annual Port of Toledo Wooden Boat Show is coming up on August 20th and 21st on the waterfront in downtown Toledo. A fun and unique activity of the Wooden Boat Show is the Yaquina Run-Off – a non-motorized, people-powered boat race. The Yaquina Run-Off is a gently competitive race scheduled for Saturday, August 20th, starting at 11 AM. The race launches at the Wooden Boat Show site at the Toledo Marina with a 3 mile short course and a 9 mile long course.

Enter the race with your canoe, kayak, row boat or racing shell and enjoy this beautiful course along the Yaquina River. Registration is $20 and includes a 2011 t-shirt. Visit: www.portoftoledo.org for registration information or call 541-336-5207.

Toledo City Hall…going for a “less cluttered” look.

Toledo Fire Dept (top),
Toledo City Hall today (middle),
Toledo City Hall with a cleaner look prior to new landscaping (lower)

A few members of the Toledo Tree Board got a sneak peak at a plan to “de-clutter” the look of Toledo City Hall. The top photo shows the original use of the building as the town’s fire hall. The second photo shows the building as city hall, pretty much as it looks today. Some believe the building’s attractive “art deco” architecture is largely covered up by overpowering landscaping, especially by the Arbor Vitae, which technically is not a tree. It’s a bush. The Tree Board will be asked to review plans for a new “do” for City Hall that will feature landscaping that doesn’t overpower the building. Ideas (not pictured in the lower photo) include planters, flowers and bushes that complement the aesthetic look of the building and which does not require nearly as much maintenance as the current landscaping.

Plans with a more finished look to the transformation will be presented to the Town Tree Board at its next meeting. For more information, call Public Works Director Adam Denlinger at 336-2247, ext. 207.

Art Walk on Labor Day Weekend in Toledo coming up!

Sue Lick, Musician, Author
Toledo Art Walk

The Yaquina River Museum of Art will again sponsor the Toledo 18th Annual Art Walk on Labor Day Weekend September 3, 4, & 5. Eighteen Toledo and invited guest artists will show work in a variety of mores and styles including fine art which includes paintings, drawings and bronze sculpture; crafts of fused glass, weaving & gourds; mosaic art; mixed media sculpture and the Art Walk Founders Show from the Permanent Collection of the Museum at the Toledo Public Library.


Musician Bert Sperling (l), Artist Michael Gibbons (r)

Special attractions this year include live music on the Museum grounds at Legacy Arts Terrace with Sue Lick, local musician and author, who will be playing guitar at the Historic School House and Justice of the Peace buildings daily. For more information about Sue, please go to www.suelick.com. Bert Sperling and Friends will be playing in the Vicarage Garden at Gallery Michael Gibbons. He will be playing western swing music this year to go along with the west and southwest art themes that will be displayed by Michael Gibbons and guest artists Don Prechtel in the Museum and Vel Miller in the Justice of the Peace Studio.

Port of Toledo Commissioners dreaming a little bit out loud…

Boat repair at Port of Toledo

When Toledo Port Commissioners sat down this week with the Toledo City Council to share ideas about the future, the commissioners told the council that their new boat repair operation at Sturgeon Bend is going so well, they’re already thinking about how they might expand it.

Port Manager Bud Shoemake said they have a travel lift and a small dry dock, along with upland areas to work on boats to prevent pollution. But he said they’re already talking about their next big step. And that would be to finance a marine rail system or a larger travel lift or maybe eventually both. Shoemake told the council that the port will be developing a business plan to help them acquire grants or low interest loans to buy the bigger lifts so they can work on bigger boats and grow the boatyard’s job base of local welders, electricians, sheet metal fabricators, hydraulic engineers, mechanics and others who keep the west coast’s fishing fleet in good running order.

Shoemake said it’s usually a good idea to work on fishing and other vessels up and out of the water. That way oils, greases, paint residues or other byproducts of working on boats don’t get into the river. Shoemake said by keeping the Sturgeon Bend Boatyard a green and clean operation, it’ll have a better chance at getting economic development grants and low interest loans to grow the business. He said a number of major boatyards up and down the west coast are having to shut down due to decades of polluting their local waters. Shoemake said Sturgeon Bend will undergo the bit of environmental clean up later this fall and when completed will make the operation increasingly competitive for new customers as other boatyards close down. He added that with the rise in the scale of boat repair operations at the Port of Toledo, other local boat repair businesses should also see an increase in customers since there will be more total boats, large and small, headed for the Yaquina River for what they need to stay safely and productively at sea.

Shoemake said their business plan should be completed by January or February. From there they’ll move forward in considering a financial strategy to begin acquiring the funds to get them the larger boat lifts. Coupled with that will be new storm sewers and wastewater collection systems and improved water service from the city to add a bit more partnership to the enterprise.

Newport Community Drum Circle

Newport Community Drum Circle

We’re four, but you don’t look a day over…
Thanks to all of the longtime members who showed up to drum on August 2. It was especially good to see those of you who have not been able to join us as regularly as in the past!. We still have another drum circle this month and a couple of exciting special events, so there’s still time to use the occasion of our anniversary to get back into the drumming habit if you have not drummed with us for awhile. Some of the faces around the circle have changed as we continue – happily – to add dozens of new members and to grow in stature in the community and we have learned some new rhythms, but the spirit of the drum circle remains the same.

Second Saturday Drum Jam @ Café Mundo
SATURDAY, AUGUST 13, 2:00 – 4:00 PM…
This is the next to the last of this summer’s Second Saturday Drum Jams at Café Mundo (before we return to our winter schedule at the gazebo, in October). Mary-Beth and I have lined up some of our best ensemble players to join the Thunder & Lightness Duo for the performance set. If you would like to sit in, let me know right away, or show up and join in during the open drumming segment. It would be a shame to miss the opportunity to play for the appreciative audiences that we have been attracting at this exciting venue. We start at 2:00 p.m. The open drumming usually starts about 3:00 p.m. and we generally play until a little after 5:00 p.m. — which is a good time to catch an awesome Café Mundo dinner before the big Saturday night rush. (more…)

Whether in the halls of Congress, or in our own front rooms. Conflicts are inevitable. Sheriff Dotson reminds us, conflict can produce good results if handled correct.

Sheriff Dennis Dotson

CONFLICT RESOLUTION

Are people struggling with more conflict these days or does it just seem that way? Whatever the case may be, learning to resolve conflicts can help people, young and old, to break down barriers, become leaders, and even prevent deadly confrontations.

Conflict can be negative; in its ultimate form it can lead to war – but it can also be positive, depending on how it is resolved. For example, it can help get feelings out in the open, help people learn from disagreements, resolve problems, gain someone more respect or enable people to learn that others are willing to stand up for themselves and what they believe in.

In fact, conflict is a natural human process that does not have to lead to violence; conflict resolution and anger management techniques can provide opportunities for people to grow and improve their relationships and the quality of life of those around them despite the inevitable disagreements that arise.

* Note that anger is a normal feeling.
* How we handle our anger and how we deal with other people who are angry can make the difference between managing conflict effectively and having conflict end in violence.
* Be aware of triggers, which are any verbal or nonverbal behaviors that result in anger or other negative emotional reactions that can get in the way of resolving conflicts.
* Triggers are like lightning bolts. When they strike, they can interfere with communication.
* To avoid pulling others’ triggers, pay particular attention to your own behavior, even your body language.
* Note that people already use the strategies to control their anger (for example, walking away from a dangerous situation), and that all they need to do is build on that foundation.
* Point out that, even though we sometimes think of ourselves as being out of control, we often choose to “blow up” in some instances and stay calm in others. For example, there is a difference between how we handle anger with our friends and anger with a relative. To resolve conflict, you must stay calm to communicate.
* The less “hot” the anger, the more you can control it.
* Even though your anger may be legitimate, it usually does not help to show your anger to the other person. Sometimes the other person will take you more seriously if you remain calm and courteous.
* Remember that your goal is to be able to get angry without becoming abusive or violent and to communicate your wants and needs without threatening others.

Your Lincoln County Sheriff’s Office is committed to reducing incidents of crime and promoting a safe environment for our citizens and visitors to improve their quality of life.

Additional resources regarding conflict resolution can be obtained by contacting Lincoln Community Dispute Resolution at (541) 574-9846.

For more tips and other information, visit our website at www.lincolncountysheriff.net

Lincoln City’s Schooner Creek Road to be closed more than two months for repairs

Schooner Creek Road, just east of city limits

Schooner Creek Road, about a mile east of the Lincoln City city limits, is being shut down for over two months to enable work crews to repair the road that was slumped out due to a nasty slide during last January’s torrential rains. The closure dates are from August 22nd through the end of October.

The slide is not a typical road slump. This one went all the way down to the bedrock, so work crews are not only rebuilding the road, they’re rebuilding what holds up the road. They’ll be dumping rock fill that’ll go down a long way. The nearly million dollar fix is being paid for out of a combination of federal highway and FEMA money. Since the fix is so extensive they’re having to dig out the entire site, fill it in with rock to a depth of thirty feet, then add gravel, then dirt, then rebuild the road on top.

Once that’s complete, the city will relay the big water main that runs from the water treatment plant, along the uphill edge of the road and into town. While the road is being fixed, Lincoln City will have use of it’s brand new “water main bypass” that runs from the water plant down Drift Creek Road, and then into town. So no one should be worried about not having enough water. There will be according to City Manager David Hawker.

So, August 22 through October 31st, Schooner Creek Road will be closed between mile post 1.2 and milepost 1.3 as crews rebuild the road. The detour will be Drift Creek Road.

Myrtle Creek man killed in horrific truck wreck on Hwy 42

Highway 42, east of Myrtle Creek

A terrible accident on Highway 42 just east of Myrtle Creek has taken the life of a Myrtle Creek man. Oregon State Police say David Hoogerhyde, 39 of Myrtle Creek, was driving his twin-trailer chip hauler on Highway 42 Wednesday evening when he took a curve at mile post 23 too wide. The truck and trailers tipped over, slid across the highway into a bridge guard rail, then plummeted over an embankment. The wreck came to rest off the roadway with the semi’s cab completely crushed. Hoogerhyde was cut out from what was left of the cab and was pronounced dead at the scene.

The OSP says they’re trying to determine the exact cause of the accident.

Yachats Fire/Rescue enroute to house fire

9:32am
Yachats Fire/Rescue is enroute to a report of a kitchen fire at a house at 520 Marine Drive, just north of town. Units not yet on scene.

9:34am
Residents tell 9-1-1 they think they have the fire out. Stove top blaze.

9:35am
Fire units on scene. No smoke showing. Investigating.

June was disappointing, but “no double dip recession” on the horizon.

Tim Duy
UO Economist

June was not a good month for Oregon. Jobless claims went up. Even temp job employment went down, along with residential building permits and trucking activity. Still, University of Oregon Economist Tim Duy maintains, “Although it’s not good, it’s not a sign we’re headed into a double dip recession.” The story is in the Oregonian. Click here.

Outstanding award for Coast Guardsman having “the right stuff.”

Petty Officer 2nd Class Thomas Henry has been honored with the Admiral Chester R. Bender Award for Heroism for two harrowing helicopter rescues in 2010.

On March 25, 2010 Henry responded with his helicopter crew to a distress call of four surfers pulled into a small enclave surrounded by steep cliffs and jagged rocks. Pummeled by tumultuous waves and confronting the dangerously panicked surfers, he was deployed into the water to hoist all four individually out of the water to safety despite peril and tremendous physical challenge.

Henry was also being honored for a courageous actions on the evening of July 5, 2010 during a response to a call of four people clinging to a 70-degree cliff, 120-feet above the beach. Deployed for a vertical rescue with blowing debris obscuring his visibility, Henry realized and communicated mid-rescue that his hoist cable had wrapped around the helicopter’s landing gear. Demonstrating unwavering composure, for twenty minutes he bravely hung below the aircraft until he was safely delivered to an airport runway.

The Coast Guard Foundation is a non-profit organization founded in 1969 that supports projects that enhance the education, welfare and morale of Coast Guard members and their families.

Coast Guard Commandant Adm. Bob Papp poses with Petty Officer 2nd Class Thomas Henry, an aviation survival technician stationed at Group/Air Station North Bend, Ore., who received the Admiral Chester R. Bender Award for Heroism during the Coast Guard Foundation’s 26th Annual Pacific Area awards dinner in San Diego, Aug. 3rd.

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