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Toledo Police now also armed with uniform-attached video cameras!

Toledo Police officer demonstrating personal video camera

The Toledo City Council received word Wednesday night that four Toledo Police officers are wearing personal High Definition video camcorders that attach to their patrol car seats or to their uniform. The camcorders are growing in popularity nationwide as an official piece of court-relavent evidence for criminal prosecution, civil proceedings and for allegations of police brutality, excessive force, assault on an officer, probable cause for stopping individuals on the street or while driving. The camcorders are also a constant reminder for officers to know that a potential courtroom is watching every second of the officer’s day on the street.

The devices cannot be started or stopped by the officer. They are issued to an officer at the beginning of their work day and are turned in at the end of that work day. The video is downloaded to a secure master recording device that has a high security access procedure usable only by police administration. Copies obtained from the recording device occurs only via personal passcodes by police administrators which are recorded in a secure, unalterable report. When criminal charges reach the courtroom, the video is then presented as any other evidence or testimony in any criminal trial. The video is handled as any other piece of evidence in what law enforcement refers to as within a “chain of custody,” which ensures that the evidence has not been tampered with or altered in any way.

The city council seemed impressed with the device and authorized the Toledo Police Department to order four more of the camcorders so that all officers will be equipped to wear one. The camcorders are being purchased with outside grant money, at no cost to the city. The cameras cost about one thousand dollars.

To see exactly how the devices are used in the field click here and play the videos.

Toledo: Traffic crash with injury at 669 SE 2nd Street

SUV off the end of SE 2nd, Toledo
Click photos to enlarge

4:12pm
Toledo Fire/Rescue and PacWest Ambulance enroute to a report of an injury accident in Toledo at 669 SE 2nd street. Watch for emergency vehicles. Vehicle over an embankment.

5:12pm
Toledo Police say a woman driving a blue SUV was driving down SE 2nd east of Alder, which is a pretty steep grade. Police say when she got to where the pavement ends and a steep embankment begins, she pushed on her brakes but her car failed to stop. It left the road and into the brush. But lucky for her the vehicle stopped short of going over an even steeper part would have put her 60 feet lower on the hill, probably rolling as it went.

The woman was placed in an ambulance for a trip to PCH to be checked out. She managed to crawl out of the wreck on her own.

Toledo: House fire on Elk City Road

Toledo firefighters raced to 178 Elk City Road on a report of smoke rising up from the basement of the multi-story house. Firefighters traced it to a basement crawl space. They quickly shut off the power to the house which stopped the smoke.

Outside, on a hillside overlooking the property, there is an extensive Christmas lights display that covers at least two to three hundred feet of property and even involves lights up a power pole or two. Neighbors say it was fed by a 90 amp power line originating in the home’s extensive workshed. It was not immediately known if the power circuit involved the house, or could have overloaded the house’s power circuits.

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Sunday morning, fire investigators traced the source of the smoke to a shorted wire in the home’s basement. They say the wire was connected to the work shop across the south lawn. However, firefighters added they could not definitively connect the electrical load of the Christmas lights and inflatable characters, south of the house, to the cause of the line failure.

There was no major damage to the home nor were there any injuries to its occupants.

Toledo tallies the score with Mother Nature


Toledo City Council Tuesday night
Mill Creek water pipe repair during storm

Toledo Public Works Director Adam Denlinger and his work crew spent a grueling 48 hours fighting to keep the town’s water and sewer systems working during the recent storms that blew ashore here on the Central Coast Sunday and Monday. Denlinger told his city council that Toledo received over eight inches of rain from the two storm fronts, which was a record for that much rain in such a short time. He said it flooded streets, storm drains and some of the storm water even got into the town’s sewer processing facility forcing it into overflow mode. But he said they handled it. Then the power went out, so they switched to emergency generators to keep the water treatment system going.

Denlinger went on to say that for four hours the town was unable to process any new water since the water coming from the Siletz River was too muddy to process and the main water line from Mill Creek decided to break in the middle of the storms. He said crews went out to Mill Creek and right off an old logging road they found the leak bubbling up from the forest floor. He said crews had to remove a number of fallen trees before they could even get to the spot they had to dig up. When excavated they found the pipe had completely failed. So they laid in a new section of pipe, fired up the pumps station at the water plant, and brought Mill Creek back on line. Denlinger said after the storms subsided yesterday Toledo’s Siletz River intake became clearer thereby allowing the Siletz to once again be the town’s main source of drinking water.

Denlinger said that Toledo never ran short of water during the storms since the town has a five day supply of water in its storage tanks. Same for Seal Rock which Toledo also serves.

The council praised Denlinger and his crews for their hard work.

The council also approved a three year competitive bid contract with Allen and Sons of Newport to continue sweeping the streets of Toledo. It’s going to cost the city about $40,000 a year to do it which is slightly higher than what was provided for in the last contract with Allen and Sons.

And the council also approved improvements to city laws that declare certain things to be nuisances and that they be either removed, cleaned or picked up. The new clarifications will clearly define what are weeds, derelict furnishings or appliances strewn about and junk cars on the street for excessive amounts of time even if their owners say ‘we’re working on them.’ Mayor Ralph Grutzmacher says earlier regulations were less precise in their language. With Tuesday’s ordinance upgrade, residents and business owners will have a clear definition of what nuisances are and what will be required to abate them. And if they’re not taken care of, how clearly the property owner could be written a ticket. The city council has said many times in the past that the point of nuisance abatement is not nearly as much about writing tickets as it is in getting all Toledo residents to fulfill their responsibility to help keep the city clean, healthy and attractive. Education and good neighborly cooperation, they say, is the key.

Toledo High School in lockdown after gunshots heard west of the school

12:30pm
Toledo High School is reported to be in lockdown at this hour after what sounded like handgun gun shots, up to ten of them, heard west of the High School.

Toledo Police are on scene and other agencies are enroute for back-up.

12:47pm
Police swept the area and found nothing suspicious. Lockdown suspended.

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