WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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Adam Denlinger resigns public works post with Toledo: Accepts job as General Manager of Seal Rock Water District.

Adam Denlinger leaving Toledo - takes top post in Seal Rock Water District

Adam Denlinger leaving Toledo – takes top post in Seal Rock Water District

Public Works Director Adam Denlinger, much admired and respected in the way he’s guided Toledo’s water and sewer system reconstruction, has resigned his post effective 5pm, May 21st, saying it was a difficult decision but he is accepting an offer to become the next General Manager of the Seal Rock Water District. Denlinger said he will ensure that there is a smooth transition for the successor to his job.

Here is Denlinger’s letter of resignation:

denlinger letter resignationdenlinger resignation II

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Fundraiser Saturday in Toledo to raise funds for SNAP Card match for food.

Toledo Street Market begins June 6th

Toledo Street Market begins June 6th

Come join the fun this Saturday April 27, at 1 PM in Toledo!

The Toledo Street Market is holding a fundraiser for matching Snap benefits and expenses. When needy families use their SNAP Cards, the market will be able to add-on extra fresh fruits and vegetables at no extra charge.

The market is hosting a Tupperware Bingo party at the Toledo AWPPU Union Hall 138 NW 1st Street, Saturday, April 27th at 1pm. There will be lots of fun, food, Bingo, and silent auction. Cost is $1.00 for your Bingo Card or 6 cards for $5.00. Your contact: Carol Boysun 541-336-2064.

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Toledo: Buys new SUV rig – $42K to accomodate ALL arrestees!

Toledo turns to Ford SUV for speed and capacity to get suspects to LCJ

Toledo turns to Ford SUV for speed and capacity to get suspects to LCJ

Toledo City Councilors Wednesday night agreed with Police Chief David Enyeart that it’s time to beging replacing the city’s aging fleet of law enforcement vehicles. Wednesday night they approved the purchase of a Ford Explorer SUV pursuit vehicle that will not only add speed to patrols but also the capacity to ensure that those arrested on criminal calls and traffic stops will be transported directly to the Lincoln County Jail. No need for back up vehicles.

Purchase price around $42,000. The price was already in the city’s budget. No surprises or impacts to other funds.

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Toledo C/C Workshop: New Patrol Car! Work Force Housing, Water Plan Update, Whither Business License for Special Events?

Toledo starting to go Ford Interceptor SUV for their fleet

Toledo starting to go Ford Interceptor SUV for their fleet

Toledo’s City Councilors got their first look at a new type of Toledo Police Patrol Car that Chief David Enyeart says would best fit the city’s needs. Chief Enyeart said the department’s patrol cars are getting “up there” in mileage – police car mileage – and it’s time to rotate in some beefier and more useable vehicles.

He told the council the Ford Police Interceptor Explorer has more room, more power, better handling and better storage for the increased amount of weaponry that is typical in leading edge law enforcement operations. He said there are too many occasions that an officer in a regular patrol car must call on the department’s larger SUV to transport a prisoner to the Lincoln County Jail. By changing over to the Ford Police Interceptors that shouldn’t happen again. He said the newer vehicles also have better gas mileage, both around town and on the highway. He said Lincoln City and Newport police departments report they’re very pleased the with Ford Interceptor SUV’s they’ve acquired.

Enyeart was given tentative approval by the council to purchase the $42,000+ vehicle. Enyeart will bring the issue back to the council at their next meeting for their formal blessing of the purchase.

The council also showed some interest in helping the Lincoln County Land Trust develop an affordable program for Toledo. A land trust spokesman said there are at least four properties in town that are either bare lots or run down homes that councilors said they were fearful would fall into the hands of someone who would simply rent them out rather than improve them or start from scratch. The trust spokesman said the trust would like to step in, buy the land (after the fire department burns down the house as a training exercise) and then help a lower income family find the financing to build a very energy efficient three bedroom, two bath home. List price in the low 100’s. The trust representative said it would like the city to help fund the project to the tune of around $6,500 which raised the eyebrows of Mayor Ralph Grutzmacher. He said he wasn’t too keen on using taxpayer dollars to subsidize new housing when many residents are just barely making it as it is.

The trust employee said they’re making affordable housing available again and that there is a lot of value in that. There are also rules that limit the value of the house to go up just 2% a year as a “firewall” of sorts against those who would buy the house, then try to flip it on the open market for a lot more money. Plus the trust forever owns the land under it. The council said although they like the idea of the land trust, they’d like to study the arrangement more closely and take it up at a later city council meeting.

Toledo Public Words Director Adam Denlinger addresses the council on future water projects

Toledo Public Words Director Adam Denlinger addresses the council on future water projects

The council also got a report from Public Works Director Adam Denlinger who told them that the town is getting closer and closer to beginning some major (and majorly expensive) upgrades to the city water system. Denlinger said construction on phase I of the new booster pump and a 1.9 million gallon water tank are expected to be under construction by early July, with completion by October or November of 2014. Phase II involves upgrading the city’s intake on the Siletz River – using a two screen system for enhanced reliability. Also the delivery and distribution system, especially as pertaining to new water access to the Sturdevant Road area, including to the high school. Denlinger said he hopes construction on that part of the water upgrade will be complete and running by June of 2015. Denlinger said he would be back before the council soon to give them the final word on everything and request their permission to proceed.

Which brought up the issue of money to pay for all this. City Manager Michelle Amberg said the community already knows that their annual water rates will rise every year at 1.5% in order to pay for water system construction bonds that were recently floated. The council said it would be better if Toledo residents also knew what was coming up on sewer rates. They asked Denlinger to help develop an annual sewer rate increase so that residents can begin budgeting for that as well. Councilor Jill Lyon emphasized that she still wants council reviews every year – not willing to go solely on a pre-determined rate. The council agreed.

The root of the problem is that Toledo’s water and sewer systems were ignored for so many decades that the entire system today needs replacing. It’s been said that former city councils and townspeople never got serious about consistently “paying it forward” so today’s residents have been left with a lot of heavy lifting to make sure their water is safe to drink and that their sewer system isn’t fouling the environment.

And finally, with the hour getting late, the council tried to tackle the thorny issue of city business licenses – especially for vendors who show up at various special events during the year, like the Wooden Boat Show, Main Street events, Farmer’s Market and Summer Festival. City Manager Michelle Amberg reported to the council that there are a lot of out-of-town businesses who show up as repeat vendors during these events, many of whom don’t pay a business license fee to the city.

The council tried to come up with a plan to ensure that all vendors have a Toledo business license or at least pay a fee to the city to be a vendor in that it’s only fair that they pay something toward what makes doing business in Toledo as straight-forward and as profitable as it can be. But the council couldn’t seem to agree on how that should all come together.

A few councilors, Terri Strom, Alma Baxter and Michele Johnson said Toledo should be very careful that Toledo is not judged by out-of-towners as “nickel and diming” businesses unjustifiably. The one line that stuck to the ceiling was “I wouldn’t want to pay a substantial amount for a temporary business license just because I want to sell jam on Main Street.” One suggestion that seemed to gain traction was the idea of an event organizer including a business license fee into the vendor application and fee schedule. However, Councilor Terry Strom that at least one special event program could fall by the wayside if that happened.

The council was getting a little more fatigued by that point and decided to explore the issue at a later city council meeting.

Bad rear-ender on Highway, just east of Toledo Friday afternoon

Injured crash victim extracted from his pickup.

Injured crash victim extracted from his pickup.

Second vehicle that hit the rear of the white pickup

Second vehicle that hit the rear of the white pickup

highway 20 rear ender 4-5-13 tool boxhighway 20 rear ender 4-5-13 white pick up rear bashed

A large pickup rammed into the back of a smaller white one on eastbound Highway 20 just east of Toledo Friday afternoon. One person went to the hospital.

Witnesses say a third eastbound vehicle was turning left ahead of the two pickups. As the white pickup came up on the turning SUV, it went around on the right shoulder. Witnesses say after the SUV turned the second pickup came up from behind and hit the just-starting-to-accelerate white pickup. The impact launched a steel tool box in the white pickup up into the air, colliding with the dark pickup. Some debris also hit the rear window of the SUV which was exiting the pavement onto a private driveway.

The white pickup was punched about 150 feet ahead of the point of impact, off the road and into a tree. The older male driver was transported by Pac West Ambulance to PCH in Newport

Toledo Art Walk and First Weekend – April 6 & 7 11am – 5pm both days!

Toledo Art Walk & First Weekend

Toledo Art Walk & First Weekend

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Becky Miller Studio to Feature Oil Paintings by Eddyville Middle School Students

Contact: Becky Miller, (503) 504-7289

On Saturday and Sunday, April 6 & 7, Becky Miller Studio is pleased to invite the public to enjoy a show of paintings by middle school students from Eddyville Charter School. Becky was one of several volunteer teachers brought in by the school to teach mini-courses in their areas of expertise.

The Artist in Residence program, which is funded by the school itself, was designed to provide more elective opportunities to the middle school students, aged 10-13. Each quarter has been split in half, and volunteers have committed to teaching 4.5-week courses 2-3 days per week. Becky participated in three of these sessions, which gave dozens of the students an opportunity to learn how to paint in oils.

Many other courses have been offered, such as Dog Obedience (taught by Tammy Boysun), Digital Photography (by Amanda Murphy and George Weaver), Forestry (by Starker Forests), Plant Identification (by Robert Taylor), Drawing (by Krista Eddy), Marine Biology and Quest (by volunteers from the Hatfield Marine Science Center), Archery (by Dick Wasson), Engineering and Remote Operated Vehicles (by Sean Bedell), and Computers (Debby Rariden). Most of the experts that were brought in to teach are from Lincoln County.

The students have responded with enthusiasm. According to Lisa Otis, who has coordinated the program, “They get very excited on the days when the upcoming courses are revealed and they get the opportunity to choose between multiple classes. Middle School students tend to be very active and like to be busy, so this program works well for them.” The school has also been pleased with the quality of instruction that has resulted from the program. “I have been amazed at the level of‘teachers’ we’ve had!” says Lisa. “The students have responded and it seems that many of them have found a new interest or hobby because of these classes.”

The volunteers have also been enthusiastic about the program. Most have offered to help again next year if the program continues.“To watch some of these children gain confidence, relax into self-expression, try so hard to make something beautiful and succeed at it, be funny, blossom, and find something they are innately good at doing has been a magical experience for me,” says Becky. “I am very proud of the work they have done.”

The Eddyville Middle School Student Art Show will be open from 11 am to 5 pm both days. Becky Miller Studio is located at 167 NE 1st Streetin Toledo. Refreshments will be served. For more information, see www.ToledoArts.info or www.BeckyMillerArtist.com.

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