WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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Fishing Access Closure….Forest Service Road 17, 10 miles southeast of Lincoln City


Forest Service Road 1790 to close June 17 – August 31

Hebo, OR – Forest Service Road 1790 will close temporarily from June 17th through August 31st, while an undersized culvert is replaced with a structure that fish are able to pass through. The road, 10.3 miles southeast of Lincoln City off Forest Service Road 17, provides access to Drift Creek Organizational Camp, which will be closed during this time.

During this road closure, visitors will not be able to access a portions of Drift Creek and North Creek limiting fishing access. Visitors wanting to fish in these creeks can gain access along the Siletz Highway, at the confluence of Drift Creek and the Siletz River.

The installation of the new fish passage is the culmination of years of collaboration with Friends of Drift Creek, MidCoast Watersheds Council, Native Fish Society and several other project funders. The project aims to address fish passage and improve access to spawning and rearing habitat for salmonids, as well as improve nutrient and sediment transport. To learn more about the project, visit https://nativefishsociety.org/campaigns/north-creek-campaign

For more information about the road closure, contact the Hebo Ranger District at 503-391-5100 or check the web for current conditions at https://www.fs.usda.gov/recmain/siuslaw/recreation. For alerts and notices, follow us @SiuslawNF or visit https://www.fs.usda.gov/siuslaw.

City of Newport Implements New Stormwater Fee

City of Newport Implements New Stormwater Fee

The City of Newport operates a stormwater system and the stormwater collected from is typically piped in developed areas and discharged into the nearest natural water body. Currently, the stormwater utility is run from a joint fund with the Streets Fund. The City is separating the two utilities to ensure that the stormwater utility is self- sufficient in the future.

In 2017, the City authorized the FCS Group to conduct a utility rate study. At the October 15, 2018 City Council meeting, Council adopted Resolution No. 3803, setting the effective dates of December 1, 2018 for water and sewer rates increase, and July 1, 2019 for the new stormwater fee.

To complete the transition to a self-sufficient utility, and as part of the utility rate study the City restructured the monthly Stormwater rates from a rate per meter to an equivalent service unit (ESU) basis. This change creates a rate structure that is common in the stormwater industry and shifts revenue collection from single family to non-single family, commensurate with associated impervious surface area and therefore, the demand placed on the stormwater system.

Under the proposed new rate structure, all non-single family customers are charged based on the total amount of impervious surface area (ISA) onsite. The average single- family residential lot has 2,700 square feet so that is the base. To calculate the total impervious surface area for a non-residential lot, the ISA is divided by the base to get
the number of ESUs for that site. This new rate structure will be implemented beginning with the July 2019 utility billing.

Sometime during the week of June 10, 2019, a letter outlining the Impervious Surface Area (ISA) and a calculated ESU for your location will arrive in the mail for your review. Further instructions will be included in the letter.
Finally, please note…single-residence homes will not receive a letter for this process because they are considered one ESU only.

For more information, please e-mail Richelle Burns at r.burns@newportoregon.gov
or Mike Murzynsky at m.murzynsky@newportoregon.gov.

Samaritan Health Services relies on the kindness of donors…

Foundation Report Highlights Donor Impact on Local Health Care

(Corvallis, Ore. – June 11, 2019) – In 2018, donors to Samaritan Health Services gave nearly $4 million toward a variety of health-related programs and projects, helping Samaritan meet its mission of building healthier communities together.

The 2019 Samaritan Foundations Annual Report recognizes the meaningful impact that was made thanks to donor and community support over the past year. Through stories and photos that show the meaningful impact of donor support, the report highlights how community support aligns with Samaritan’s organizational priorities of quality and service excellence, employee engagement, community partnership and sustainability.
Every gift makes a profound impact, from new equipment and services for patient care, to early childhood education in an underserved area to arts supplies for employee and patient activities.
The 2019 report can be found online at samhealth.org/FoundationReport. It includes a weblink to a donor survey, through which all feedback is welcomed.

For more information, contact your local hospital foundation:

Albany: 541-812-4819 or samhealth.org/AGHF
Corvallis: 844-768-4256 or samhealth.org/GSHF
Lebanon: 541-451-6303 or samhealth.org/LCHF
Lincoln City: 541-996-7102 or samhealth.org/NLHF
Newport: 541-574-4745 or samhealdh.org/PCHDF

A letter to the folks back home…

Sen. Jeff Merkley
D-Oregon

In recent years, as I’ve traveled to every corner of Oregon to host an annual town hall meeting in each county, I have heard heart-wrenching stories from Oregonians who have lost loved ones after a prescription for an injury or treatment turned into an addiction. Others are watching as family members, neighbors, and friends struggle to find resources to help them recover.

Now, we know that drug companies caused and fueled this epidemic by intentionally downplaying the addictiveness of opioid drugs, and pushing to keep patients on powerful painkillers. Instead of warning doctors about addiction risks, pharmaceutical companies continued to flood the streets with far more opioids than could ever be responsibly consumed in order to maximize their profits. That’s unacceptable, and we need to hold these corporations responsible for their reckless behavior.

That’s why I’m introducing legislation that would impose fees on drug companies based on how many opioids they sold since 1999 — the year the opioid crisis slowly began to build — to fund substance abuse prevention and treatment. The Opioid Treatment Surge Act will use these fees, totaling $2 billion per year, to more than double funding to the Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant program — including another $23 million per year for Oregon.

It’s time for drug companies to take responsibility for creating this crisis by paying to treat the addictions they caused. Approximately 1.7 million Americans struggle with substance abuse disorders stemming from prescription drugs, and more than 130 Americans die from an opioid overdose every day — while pharmaceutical corporations have made billions. As communities struggle to provide critical resources to prevent and treat substance abuse, it’s only right that the companies who made massive profits from selling opioids help fund the solution.

I also understand that, for many people, prescription opioids are essential for maintaining a quality of life. I believe we can and must both treat this addiction epidemic as the national medical emergency that it is, and also maintain access to prescription opioids for patients who need them to manage the debilitating effects of cancer, nerve damage, back injuries, and other sources of chronic pain.

America can’t afford to wait another moment before acting swiftly to address the opioid addiction epidemic. Please know that I will continue to force the pharmaceutical industry to put consumers first, and am committed to supporting those in our communities struggling with opioid addiction.

All my best,
Jeff

Ernest Bloch Dinner at Sylvia Beach Hotel coming up

Maestro Yaacov Bergman

The Ernest Bloch Legacy Project will hold its annual Ernest Bloch Dinner at the Sylvia Beach Hotel on Friday, July 5 beginning at 6 p.m. Guest speaker for this special event will be Maestro Yaacov Bergman, Artistic Director and Conductor of the Siletz Bay Music Festival. You are invited to reserve a seat in the Tables of Content Restaurant by contacting Frank Geltner at fgeltner@ErnestBloch.org or by calling 541-961-1482. Tickets are $50 per person. Seating is limited.

Yaacov (Yaki) will be talking about his history with the Bloch family and some observations about Bloch’s music.

Born in Israel, Yaacov Bergman’s early musical training began with violin and vocal studies, but he soon expressed an avid interest in composing and conducting. After graduation from the Rubin Academy of the Hebrew University, Jerusalem, he completed post-graduate studies at the Mannes College of Music in New York. He pursued further conducting studies under the guidance of Charles Bruck, a disciple of Pierre Monteux, as well as private study under Leonard Bernstein.

Maestro Bergman is also Music Director of the Portland Chamber Orchestra and the Walla Walla Symphony. Maestro Bergman guest conducted with the New Russia Philharmonic, Belarus National Chamber Orchestra in Minsk, Osaka Symphonica, the Buffalo Philharmonic, the San Diego Symphony, the West Virginia Symphony, repeat appearances with the Lodz and Bydgoszcz Philharmonics in Poland, a debut performance with the Vienna Radio Symphony Orchestra, a third appearance with the Brooklyn Philharmonic in New York and a concert tour with the Israel Sinfonietta and The Israel Kibbutz Orchestra.

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