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Siletz “concerned citizens” spray two combatants fighting in the middle of 229

A Lincoln City man has been arrested for disorderly conduct for fighting with another man in the middle of Highway 229 just north of Siletz. Sheriff’s deputies say when they pulled up they found Daniel Jackson, 25 already in Toledo police custody. What were described as “concerned citizens” heard the fighting, ran over and told the two to stop. When they didn’t, the citizens pulled out pepper spray and sprayed them. That apparently slowed them down enough to where a Toledo police officer could get Jackson in handcuffs.

Jackson was transported to the Lincoln County Jail where he was booked for disorderly conduct and was being held on $10,000 bail. Deputies say the other combatant wasn’t arrested at the time, but they’re still looking into it.

NOAA accepts applications from three states to “remove” salmon gulping sea lions at base of Bonneville Dam

Sea Lion Bull and Spring Chinook

Sea Lions feasting on Chinook Salmon, protected under the Endangered Species Act, are back in the cross-hairs of NOAA fisheries and other agencies and groups to determine if they should be “removed” from the base of Bonneville Dam. Salmon smolts and adults for that matter, are an important link in the ocean’s food chain, but many commercial and sports fishermen say the sea lions are out of control on rivers in Washington and Oregon. Even Idaho is complaining that voracious sea lions are severely hampering salmon stock recoveries because fish are being devoured down stream even before they can make it up stream to spawn.

The issue has gone back and forth between advocates of salmon versus advocates of sea lions. And once again, NOAA is re-opening the idea of “taking” sea lions out of the equation. The story is in the Oregonian. Click here.

About world migration and changing commnity patterns

Elliot Young, Lewis & Clark College

The Newport Public Library will host “Borderless: Migration, Globalization, and Changing Communities,” a Conversation Project led by Lewis & Clark College professor Elliott Young, on Thursday, September 15th, at 7:00 p.m.

This FREE program addresses the question of how local communities, in the twenty-first century, can think in new ways about the relationship between migration and globalization, and their effects on Oregon.

Young was born in New York City and has been migrating westward ever since. He has conducted research and performed community development work in Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and Ecuador. Young has been a professor of Latin American and borderlands history at Lewis & Clark College in Portland since 1997.

This Conversation Project is sponsored by Oregon Humanities, an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust, with additional help from The Whaler.

For more information about this program, call the Newport Library at 541.265.2153 or check its website, www.newportlibrary.org.

State Representative Jean Cowan is not running for re-election.

Coastal State Representative Jean Cowan has decided to serve out her current term and then call it a career. Rep. Cowan said her 20 years in public service have come to a close and it’s now time for the grandkids. Her open letter to House District 10 residents is presented here in its entirety.

State Rep. Jean Cowan, not running for re-election

Friends,

It is time to share my plans with those of you who have become regular correspondents with me during my tenure as State Representative. To those of you who have also supported (both financially and emotionally) my efforts to gain and retain this position, I want you to know how much I have appreciated that support – and I want to assure you that I will do my best to see to it that HD 10 will be well-represented in the years to come.

Today I am announcing that I will not seek re-election for the 2013 term as the State Representative for the newly realigned House District 10. I will, however, continue to serve in my position until I complete my third two-year term in December, 2012.

Prior to my election to the State Legislature, I served as a Lincoln County Commissioner for three terms. And, before Pat and I moved to Lincoln County in 1987, I served as a city councilor and mayor of Elgin, Oregon. After more than 20 years in elected offices, it is now time for me to step aside.

My grandchildren are the primary reason for my decision to retire from public service. The children are now 10, 9, and 3 years old and they all live a considerable distance from Newport. My husband, Pat, and I want to be able to be fully involved in their lives. I have sincerely enjoyed the opportunity to represent the citizens of House District 10, but it is now time for me to spend more time enjoying my grandchildren and sharing in their activities.

Our grandchildren are the reason that I sought the legislative office in the first place. I wanted to help the State of Oregon offer the same opportunities to my grandchildren as it did to Pat and me, and our children. I wish I were convinced that we are fulfilling that commitment at the present time.

I am proud of my accomplishments which include being instrumental in securing state support and funding to aid the Port of Newport’s successful bid for the NOAA Marine Operations Center-Pacific facility, as well as funding for the Oregon Coast Community College’s new Aquarium Sciences building. Along with many other local residents I participated in the festivities celebrating the recent grand openings for both facilities. As the current Chair of the Coastal Caucus, I am seeking balance between many competing marine activities. Those efforts continue to support additional marine research, protect valuable resources, and maintain a sustainable and economically vital harvest of the sea’s bounty.

During my time in office, the needs of seniors have also been a top priority for me, and I will continue to focus on senior issues during the remainder of my term. My recent appointment as Co-Chair of the Ways and Means Subcommittee for Human Services, and my role on the Governor’s Senior Services Advisory Council, allow me to focus most of my attention on maintaining as adequate a level of services as possible for our most vulnerable citizens. I am pleased that my decision to retire from public service at the end of my term will allow me to focus fully on my continuing responsibilities, without the distraction of another political campaign.

The Secretary of State is now accepting declarations of candidacy or petitions for nomination for the May 15, 2012 primary election; the filing period closes on March 6, 2012. Because I know that planning to seek public office requires thoughtful decision-making, I want to allow potentially interested individuals as much time as possible to consider this opportunity. I will be happy to discuss the opportunities and the challenges of public service with anyone who might be considering a run for this position.

Take care,

Jean

e-mail: rep.jeancowan@state.or.us
phone: 503-986-1410

Lincoln City City Council hedges on NE Port Avenue pedestrian/bicycle bridge

What’s called a critical piece of Lincoln City’s Head to Bay Trail has run into a bit of a fog bank as the city council has decided to seek assurance that any possible cost overruns on the project don’t come back on the city. The critical link in the trail is a new bike and pedestrian bridge that would cross the ravine at the end of NE Port Avenue. The nearly $810,000 cost is split 80/20 with ODOT, with the city’s piece at $162,000. Although the ODOT agreement notes that any amount not covered will come from the State Transportation Funds not allocated to the 2012-13 fiscal year.

Although the council acknowledged ODOT’s statement of covering any overages, they wanted more assurance that the city’s portion will be as stated in the contract and no more. Public Works Director Lila Bradley said she will discuss the issue with ODOT and report back to the council.

If constructed, the bridge will connect the Head to Bay Trail along the east side of Highway 101 and will provide hiking and bicycling access to several hard to get to recreation areas of Lincoln City. The crossing of the ravine, rather than riding around it, was deemed the preferred route because the existing street network does not have enough right-of-way to allow for a wider pathway. City staff contends that routing trail hikers and bicyclists out onto fairly narrow city streets would discourage use of the Head to Bay Trail.

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