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A big push-pin artwork show at the Newort Visual Arts Center

21st Annual PushPin Show 2011 – Everyone Welcome

The 21st Annual PushPin Show, sponsored by Oregon Coast Council for the Arts (OCCA), has been scheduled in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center from December 3 through the 31st. The Opening Reception for the artists and the community is from 5:00pm to 7:00pm on Saturday, December 3rd. Everyone is welcome to the Opening to meet the artists and view the exhibit. Refreshments will be served.

OCCA welcomes Lincoln County artists of all ages and levels of experience to show their artwork in the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center (VAC). All Lincoln County residents including beginners, emerging artists, established professionals, hobbyists and dabblers, youngsters, oldsters, college students and retirees are invited to participate.

To enter the show, bring your artwork to the Runyan Gallery at the Newport Visual Arts Center on Friday, December 2nd or Saturday, December 3rd between 10 am and 4 pm. There will be volunteers ready to help you enter the show. The gallery will close at 4pm on Saturday to allow OCCA to set up the opening reception that starts at 5:00pm.

Rules for the PushPin Show:
1) The artwork must be original. No prints or facsimiles.
2) You must be able to hang your artwork with just 4 or fewer pushpins. Each artist should hang their own work.
3) Work should be no larger than 36” x 36” so there is enough wall space for everyone.
4) This is a family oriented community show, and OCCA asks that the work be appropriate for all audiences.
5) Artwork may be for sale, and OCCA encourages you to put a price on your work. OCCA retains a 30% commission if you are an OCCA member and a 35% commission for those who are not members.

The original PushPin Show was the brainchild of local artist and art activist Jimmy Frankfort. And while it has grown over the years, it still adheres to an inclusive, all county, community show that exemplifies part of the Oregon Coast Council for the Art’s mission to build an “art bridge” between the arts and the community by bringing together the resources of the VAC, the diverse talents of the many community artists, and the public to share in the creation, celebration and support of our local art. It is a great opportunity to offer your work for sale in a gallery, or to buy a piece of local art.

Visitors to the PushPin Show will have the opportunity to vote for their favorite piece. The “People’s Choice” winner and runners up, determined by votes submitted throughout the show, will be announced at the gallery opening reception in January.

The VAC is located at 777 NW Beach Drive on the Nye Beach Turnaround overlooking the ocean. The Runyan Gallery is open Tuesday through Sunday from 11:00am to 5:00pm. For more information please call Sally Houck, OCCA Director of the VAC, at 541-265-6569.

Two Waldport Men Busted for Drugs and Assaulting Newspaper Box

Chris Echols, (L)
Patrick Olson, (R)

Two Waldport men were arrested this week in what may be yet another illustration of a pattern that District Attorney Rob Bovett says demonstrates the real motive behind most burglaries. Stealing to buy drugs.

A Waldport resident called the sheriff’s office to report that two men had hijacked a local newspaper vending box in front of the post office by loading it onto a dolly and wheeling it down the street and into a garage. There they proceeded to cut off the lock to the money box. However, by then law enforcement was on the way. When they pulled up and announced themselves Patrick Olson and Chris Echols took off running. The officers say they caught them and brought them back to the garage where it was obvious to the officers what the two were doing.

Within a short time officers found a methamphetamine pipe on Echols and later discovered he also possessed methamphetamine. Upon a search of Olson’s residence officers say they found stolen property from a recent Waldport burglary.

Echols and Olson were booked into the Lincoln County Jail. Officers say their investigation is not over and expect further charges to emerge.

Lincoln City City Council No Longer Doing “The Squeeze” On Flood Plain development


Sandcastle Hotel, Lincoln City

Rather than tossing the city’s building height regulations out the window, the Lincoln City City Council decided to back up and return to doing things in a simpler manner. In this case, if a building is located in a flood plain, the owner must eliminate some or all of his first floor uses to ensure that any eventual flood doesn’t cause more damage than necessary. The less materials on the first floor, the less there will be soaked and ruined.

But by using the first floor as a flood buffer, it leaves the hotel, like the Sandcastle on Anchor Way, with a lot fewer rooms to rent. City Councilor Gary Ellingson, speaking as a private citizen from the audience Monday night, said that in order for his Sandcastle Hotel to make money, they need at least four floors of hotel rooms. However, in this case, that would put his building at over 40 feet…well above the city’s maximum building height of 35 feet.

The city council deliberated building heights at length, finally deciding to leave it at 35′. However if Mr. Ellingson wishes to add another horizontal line of rooms to his hotels, he said the request will have to be made for a variance which Mayor Dick Anderson said that he favors. The matter will return to the city council next month for final and formal adoption.

Lincoln City still trying to develop workable sea cliff development rules

Rules governing what can be built and how close to the edges of ocean cliff faces can something be built continued to get a good mulling over, during Monday night’s Lincoln City City Council meeting. Councilors agreed that restrictions like set-backs need to be 60 times the annual erosion rate of a particular lot, plus another five feet. There are exceptions in very special cases where cliff or bluff reinforcements are already in place. There will be a geotechnical analysis done at the owner’s expense, including updates over the years if additional construction is requested by the owner.

The council, however, doesn’t want to require that a geologic hazard analysis be recorded at the county courthouse for each property. However, they do want a written statement on any geologic analysis to be part of the property’s file with the city.

The council told staff to return with a more refined geologic hazard ordinance that would ensure that all geologic studies are the financial responsibility of the land owner, that the city use more up to date maps on geologic hazardous zones along the city’s coastline, and that there be allowed some exemptions to the new ordinance like allowing acceptable tree removals, and small outbuildings that don’t require a city building permit.

City councilors figure it’ll be early next year before the regulations are finished and put on the books.

Roads End Water District still trying to halt Lincoln City’s annexation efforts

Lincoln City City Council and Roads End area homes

The Roads End Water District is asking to meet with the Lincoln City City Council to arrange continued water service to the area just beyond the northern city limits. A number of Roads End residents have been struggling to derail the city’s annexation plans that have been gaining substantial momentum of late; the city said to be close to getting enough signatures from property owners to make the annexation complete. Lincoln City City Councilors and the Lincoln County Board of Commissioners have both cited many reasons that the Roads End area should annex into Lincoln City in that it’s a thoroughly urbanized area and already enjoys urban services in terms of defacto police protection, library, community center, tourism promotion and others, all heavily subsidized by Lincoln City taxpayers. But many Roads End residents say there is little truth in any of those claims and that Lincoln City is trying to gobble up Roads End to fleece them for higher property taxes.

The story goes back to the 1970’s when Roads End needed to replace a faltering water supply. When Lincoln City saved them by providing water, the then residents and the water district they formed promised the city they’d annex in…eventually. Well, thirty years later they’re still getting water from the city, admittedly at twice the rate city residents pay, but still no annexation.

City Manager David Hawker says under state law, Lincoln City is under no legal obligation to provide water service to the Roads End area and that the city is legally empowered to shut off their water. That’s what the city has threatened to do on several occasions if the Roads End area refuses to join the city.

The letter from the Roads End Water District (which has no water supply nor any delivery system in place) Monday evening called on the city council to meet with them to arrange continued water service. The city council is sending a letter back to the water district saying that City Manager David Hawker and Mayor Dick Anderson would be happy to meet with water district board members to see what they have to say. But Hawker, Anderson and the rest of the council stated that they have every intention to proceed with the annexation process. They claim it’s something that is decades overdue.

If enough Roads End property owners take the city up on annexation in return for not having their water shut off, the annexation would be automatic. However, when asked whether he thought that a group of Roads End residents might try to stop the annexation through the courts, Mayor Anderson said, “I hope not, but it wouldn’t surprise me. ” Hawker has said in the past that the city is on extremely solid legal footing in pushing for the annexation and that provisions in state law clearly authorize such actions when urban areas (within urban growth boundaries) are asked to annex in.

Meanwhile the city council passed a resolution Monday night that lays out what would happen to Roads End’s water status after they are annexed into the city. Responding to rumors that Roads End residents would become second class water customers, and have their water cut off during droughts or other supply emergencies, the council declared that the Roads End area would be treated the same as any other Lincoln City water customer. No more, no less. Hawker says that Roads End users would receive the same quality water service, but at half the price since they would be joining the Lincoln City family of water customers and as regular city taxpayers. After annexation, although Roads End residents would see their water bills cut in half, their property taxes would rise substantially.

A Call Out To Struggling or Strained Businesses


Provided by OCCC Small Business Development Center
Finding Your Profit Zone: How to Take Concrete Steps to Improve Your Bottom Line.
A FREE Class Offered by the OCCC-SBDC and the Small Business Management Alumni Club

When: Wednesday, Dec 7 6:30-9:00 p.m.
Where: OCCC Newport
Cost: FREE and open to the public
Presenter: Robert Sherk SBM Instructor at Clackamas C.C.

Let us know if you are attending: RSpisso@occc.cc.or.us

Are you struggling to keep your doors open? Do you want greater profits? Why not listen to someone who has successfully run major corporations and is recognized throughout the state as a leading business instructor.

The Small Business Development Center at Oregon Coast Community College has invited Robert Sherk, to speak to Lincoln County businesses about the concrete steps that they can take today to increase their cash flow and profits. “Bob is a great instructor. He has a life time of experience in sales and management. After leaving his position as a CEO in the corporate world, in his retirement, Bob decided to help small business owners grow their business using solid management principles, “said Ron Spisso the SBM instructor at OCCC. “Bob has developed some great materials on improving the bottom line of every business in our county. On Dec 7, he will lay out a series of concrete steps that can be started the next day by any business owners that attend the workshop.”

Bob makes it clear that often business owners focus on increasing sales at any price. Business owners need to work with the right customers to increase profits now and in the future. Bob consults with Fortune 500 as well as small closely held organization in his community college classes at Clackamas Community College. He asks them: Are you profitable? If not: What is your profit plan moving forward? Bob’s Principles are: Every major business decision you make, going forward, should be evaluated primarily on the basis of: How it impacts the customer and the relationship. How it impacts profitability, short and long term.

Ron Spisso, the Coordinator of the Small Business Management program at Oregon Coast Community College says. “Our Small Business Alumni Club sponsors several events a year targeting established business owners. We all know that we are in a challenging business environment on the Oregon Coast. The best business will survive any economic downturn. A new idea or reviewing fundamentals can make an educational evening well worth the effort. After being in business for twenty years and teaching for another twenty I always learn pointers from Bob Sherk.”

The seminar will be held on Wednesday, December 7 from 6:30 to 9:00 pm. in the Community Room 140 at the Oregon Coast Community College campus in South Beach. It is free of charge and open to the public.

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