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Siltez Tribe receives big grant to launch another attempt to stem domestic and sexual violence

Help prevent domestic violence

Provided by Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians

Siletz Tribe Receives Grant to Address Sexual and Domestic Violence

The Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians has received a grant from the U.S. Department of Justice to combat the growing epidemic of domestic violence, sexual assault, dating violence and stalking committed against American Indian women and girls.

The three-year, $419,325 grant will allow for two program specialists to provide culturally appropriate services for Tribal members in Lincoln County who are victims of these types of violence and help them with access to crisis intervention, access to counseling by trained advocates and/or staff and access to peer support groups.

The program also will:

*Develop policies to create an effective response to crimes of violence against Indian women and create a coordinated domestic violence community response team and a sexual assault response team.

* Forge partnerships with local community programs with established expertise in dealing with victims of sexual and domestic violence.

*Provide information to the Tribal community to promote greater awareness of domestic violence and to end the silence around issues of this type of violence.

“This program will allow us to develop an environment in which the Tribal community, the larger community and the existing resources in the surrounding area can all be brought together in a mutually supportive way to help reduce, if not eradicate, these problems and the terrible effects they have on victims and family members where they occur,” said Bonnie Petersen, assistant general manager of the Siletz Tribe.

Petersen points out that a number of published reports indicate that Native American women are twice as likely to experience a rape/sexual assault (5 per 1,000 persons age 12 or older) compared to all races (2 per 1,000). This is caused, at least in part, by more than 200 years of historical and generational trauma that has resulted in disproportionately high rates of dysfunction for Tribal individuals, families and communities.

For more information, please contact Petersen at 541-444-8210 or 800-922-1399, ext. 1210.

McMinnville man arrested for rape/sexual abuse at Lincoln City hotel.

Nathaniel White, 24

A McMinnville man has been indicted by a Lincoln County grand jury on charges that he raped and otherwised sexually abused a McMinnville woman at a hotel in Lincoln City back in June. Deputy District Attorney Michelle Branum told NewsYamhillCounty.com that the grand jury filed charges against Derek White that included first degree Rape, one count of Sexual Abuse in the second degree and one count of Sexual Abuse in the third degree.

Branum said the case came to light when the McMinnville victim called authorities in Yamhill County who in turn alerted Lincoln City Police. White was returned to Lincoln County where he was booked into the county jail in Newport where he awaits his next court appearance October 10th. He remains in the county jail in lieu of $250,000 bail.

Scary few moments in front of Taft Elementary: Wrecked car, cops with guns drawn

Edgman (L), Greenawalt (R)

Lincoln City Police went on a short pursuit Tuesday, after an officer recognized a wanted man in a passing car and took off after him. The chase ended in a traffic crash near Taft Elementary and High Schools with police drawing guns on the crashed car. Police not only got their wanted man, who was wanted out of Wasco County for drugs, they also arrested the driver, Melissa Greenawalt, charging her with fleeing from police and reckless driving.

More details in the News Guard. Click here.

Third official public hearing on fate of Lincoln County Animal Shelter is TODAY!!

Lincoln County Animal Shelter

Lincoln County Commissioners are preparing to hold their third public hearing on the fate of the county animal shelter. It’ll be held in the commissioner’s chambers on the bottom floor of the courthouse Wednesday, September 28, at 1:30pm.

County Commissioners will be taking public testimony up to and including their final decision as to whether the county sheriff’s office will retain responsibility for running it, or if it will be assigned it to a local non-profit, Friends of the Lincoln County Animal Shelter (FOLCAS). Proponents of both organizations have been adamant that they can do the better job. FOLCAS and their supporters say non-profits by the thousands run animal shelters across the country and that they do a very good job, and for a lot less money through donations and volunteers, than public entities. Sheriff’s Office supporters contend that FOLCAS is an untested non-profit and that their records and spending would not be as accountable or transparent as they would be under a public entity like the sheriff’s office. FOLCAS disagrees pointing out that their accounts will be monitored by auditors and other controllers since FOLCAS would be using public funds. They say public funds would continue to come from a continuation of a special five cent property tax override approved by the voters in 2009 to support the shelter until its final management structure could be worked out.

Sheriff Dennis Dotson has been a very vigorous campaigner for the shelter to remain under his control, claiming his office has been proven to be a competent and compassionate organization that knows what it’s doing. FOLCAS supporters say the costs of keeping the shelter open under a government agency will only run up the cost of the shelter, costs that could be saved by going with a non-profit like themselves.

Wednesday’s Board of Commissioner’s public hearing on the matter begins at 1:30pm, September 28th. After the public has spoken, the commissioners will close the public hearing and make plans to bring the matter back during a regularly scheduled board meeting in the very near future.

County commissioners have state repeatedly that costs of county employees keeps going up while revenues remain flat. They have said during public meetings that the cost of public employee benefits, especially, may soon equal worker paychecks, which would bankrupt the county. Commissioners have said that they must give FOLCAS a very comprehensive look because the county needs to save money, not find more ways to spend what little they have. They have vowed to hold FOLCAS financially and operationally accountable should they be awarded the contract to run the shelter. Commissioners say they expect the current nickel property tax, or a portion of it, will be needed to support the shelter regardless of who wins their approval. However, commissioners have also said that FOLCAS’s reliance on that tax should diminish over the near term as they activate more volunteers, fundraisers and grant sources.

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