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WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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Learning how to help others live with chronic health conditions – at NO Charge!

Lincoln County Health and Human Services announces that a FREE Living Well with Chronic Conditions “Train the Trainer” workshop to benefit individuals living with a chronic or ongoing health condition in Lincoln County. The Train the Trainer workshop will be held on Thursday and Friday, September 22, 23, 29 and 30, 9-4:00 pm. The training will be held at Lincoln County Health and Human Services, 51 SW Lee St., Newport. Again, the program is free.

This Stanford program and research study showed improved self-management skills and quality of life for people living with ongoing health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, emphysema, fibromyalgia, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, heart conditions, high blood pressure, Multiple Sclerosis, and other chronic conditions. The program requires participants and leaders meet for two and a half hours, once a week for six weeks, in community settings such as senior centers, churches, libraries, and hospitals. This FREE program provides techniques and tools for participants to incorporate as they learn to create self-management plans for coping with chronic symptoms, frustrations and fatigue.

Did we mention that this workshop is FREE to all participants? However, pre-registration is required, space is limited and will fill up quickly! To register, or for additional information, call Ann Way, MS, Coordinator, 541-265-0465, Lincoln County Health and Human Services.

The Living Well with Chronic Condition program is sponsored by Samaritan Health System, Oregon Cascades West Council of Governments and Lincoln County Health and Human Services.

Help “Fiesty’s” owners find him. He’s gone missing!

Fiesty is missing in Newport!

Please help Fiesty’s “staff” find him. He is missing from his usual haunts at Dolphin Realty on SW 7th in Newport. Fiesty is a ten year old short hair Russian Blue, all grey, no markings.

If you’ve see Fiesty or know where he might be please call Dolphin Realty at 541-265-6638, or 800-365-6638.

OMG! Siletz is getting cell phone service!

A brand new tower much like the one in the picture, will give the city of Siletz and surrounding areas something they’ve longed for for years. CELLPHONE SERVICE!

After long negotiations between the Siletz Tribes and AT&T, with the Bureau of Indian Affairs playing a role, AT&T has agreed to build a new 250′ cell phone tower atop Government Hill, near the water tank, overlooking Siletz. The coverage area of AT&T’s signal should reach way out Logsden Road to the east, and up and down Highway 229 for quite a ways north and south of town.

Officials say once the tower is up, other cell phone providers are expected to attach their own cellphone transmission and receiving antennas to the tower. It’s being reported that the tower should be built within the next six weeks, with sign-on for cell service shortly after that. For the moment it serves AT&T customers only, but typically Verizon and Sprint follow soon-after.

The Siletz Warriors basketball team took state last year, the town recently became home to the manufacturing of personalized jet aircraft, and now the town is getting cellphone service. Siletz is on a roll!

Newport all but eliminating herbicide use on public property

More pulling and yanking and less of this stuff

After being deluged with anti-herbicide e-mails and conversations with city residents, the Newport City Council has gotten the message that chemical herbicides have darn few friends in Newport. After reading a city parks and recreation committee report that disparaged chemicals but ultimately was judged too soft on them, the council decided to send the report back for some tightening up. For one thing it appeared that the council wants the prime directive to be, “no chemicals on city property,” UNLESS specifically authorized by either the city manager or the parks and recreation director. And they better have a good excuse!

Critics contend there are mountains of studies that show a clear and present danger to seniors and children especially who are exposed to herbicides. They say a public agency should exhaust every alternative before using chemical attacks, but even then, the community might rather just live with the problem out of concern for public health. However, City Parks and Recreation Director Jim Protiva reminded the council that some invasive plants pose allergic and asthmatic reactions in some people, which is a significant health threat. Protiva also reminded the council that relying strictly on labor or mechanical removal is not without its problems, not the least of which are costs.

The council told Protiva to rework the committee’s recommendations and report back when he’s finished so the council can have another go at it. They reiterated that the directive should be “no chemicals in Newport” unless specifically authorized with a clear and public explanation as to why. Again, the chemical ban pertains to city parks, rights of way and other city properties, like around city hall and other public buildings within Newport city limits.

City stumbles on trying to get cop cars maintained.

Newport City Hall

During Monday night’s Newport City Council meeting councilor David Allen caught something that didn’t make him happy. Or anyone else on the council either. Allen confronted City Manager Jim Voetberg over an invoice given to the city for handling a reversal of a recent council’s decision to award a police car maintenance contract to a local repair garage. Voetberg quickly deferred to City Finance Director David Marshall who said the award was protested by another repair garage. The claim was that the recommendation before the council had been the product of bias, not an objective assessment of which repair garage would benefit the city most. Marshall said the city administration, on its own, withdrew the contract offer after consulting with the city attorney’s office in Eugene. Marshall went on to say that the city attorney indicated the withdrawal was appropriate.

However, that decision rattled Allen’s sensibilities about the job of staff vs. the job of the council. He was visibly miffed that staff took it upon themselves to reverse an action of the city council, and on top of that, doing it without notifying the council that they had done it.

Marshall apologized but again assured the council that the move had the city attorney’s blessing. That riled Allen again asking “Why didn’t we get a notice from the city attorney that this had happened? Why did I have to stumble on it while reading an invoice from the city attorney to the city? An e-mail is all it would have taken.” Allen went onto say that communications between the city attorney and the council is very important. The council agreed.

The council decided last spring to hire a Eugene law firm that specializes in government law. In a move to keep legal fees to a minimum, the council acquiesced on a procedure that only Mayor Mark McConnell and City Manager Jim Voetberg would have unfettered access to the firm, while the six city councilors would need prior approval. There has been talk among the councilors that they reserve the right to call anyway if they feel strongly about an issue that they want clarified. However, they have said that such occurrences would be infrequent if not rare. Councilor Allen, himself an attorney, has been the most outspoken about the right of councilor access to the city attorney.

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