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Volunteers needed for Depoe Bay Salmon Bake on Saturday, the 15th!

VOLUNTEERS ARE NEEDED FOR THE DEPOE BAY SALMON BAKE ON SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 15TH FROM 9 AM TO 5 PM AT THE DEPOE BAY CITY PARK.

DINNER, INDIAN DANCING AND LIVE MUSIC ARE ONLY $19 FOR ADULTS, $10 FOR CHILDREN AT THE GATE. SAVE THREE DOLLARS PER ADULT AND ONE DOLLER PER CHILD BY PURCHASING YOUR TICKETS IN ADVANCE AT THE DEPOE BAY CHAMBER OFFICE JUST SOUTH OF THE BRIDGE ON HIGHWAY 101.

LOCAL DINNER DELIVERIES ARE AVAILABLE FROM SALISHAN TO OTTER ROCK, BUT ORDERS NEED TO BE PLACED IN ADVANCE. PROCEEDS WILL BENEFIT THE CITY OF DEPOE BAY AND THE DEPOE BAY CHAMBER OF COMMERCE. CALL THE DEPOE BAY CHAMBER AT 541-765-2889 FOR DETAILS AND CALL RSVP FOR INFORMATION ON VOLUNTEERING AT 541-574-2684.

Another, but more elegant Oregon ‘civil war’

Wine grapes, near Roseburg

There is a more refined, if not downright friendly, sort of ‘civil war’ going on between northern Oregon wineries and grape growers and those from the south, around Roseburg, Grants Pass and Medford. Instead of trying to out do the other, they’ve figured out a way to make it possible to more cooperatively produce better wines at both ends of the state. The story is in the Oregonian. Click here.

Still fightin’ over the fate of a photo of Mo’s founder and Rogue Ales benefactor Mojava Niemi.

Mojava “Mo”Niemi

Although it’s been years since a lawsuit was filed by Rogue Ales charging that a picture framing company lost a “racey” portrait of the namesake of “Mo’s Restaurants,” the legal battle is far from over.

The “Naked in the bathtub” photo of Mojava “Mo” Niemi, was hung over the bar for years at the Rogue House on the Bayfront. It was a reminder of the scrappy and innovative woman who first directed Rogue Brewery founder Jack Joyce to the South Beach spot where Rogue Ales set up shop. “Mo” was a Port of Newport Commissioner at the time and was widely known to have wanted to operate a brewpub on the Bayfront.

Anyway…back to our story about the photograph and the lawsuit. That part of it is in the Oregonian. Click here.

Oregon’s White Oaks Inside and Out – October 6-31

The Frank Lloyd Wright Gordon House proudly presents Michael Gibbons “Oregon’s White Oaks Inside & Out”
Art Show & Sale October 6 through 31

Silverton —Michael Gibbons’ original oil paintings will be on exhibition for a full month to be sure everyone has time to visit and enjoy the views of the white oak trees inside and out. Gibbons painted the ancient white oak woodland plein aire in 2005 in a series of images to pay homage to the historic white oak savanna. Wright’s only Oregon building is a wonderful gallery of masonry and glass with views of the trees that inspired Gibbons’ art. The show and sale will be on display at the Gordon House from October 6 and 31. The house is open almost every day from 12 noon to 4 p.m. Call for hours and reservations. Guided tours are $10 per person. Art show admittance is $3, and Gordon House members are free. The public is invited to a reception for the artist Oct. 20 2:-7:pm.

Silverton’s Garryana White Oak Woodlands

A serene grove of White Oak trees just south of Silverton is a wonderful example of the remains of the historic hardwood forests that stretched from Canada to Central California through Oregon’s Willamette Valley. These trees are 200 to 400 years old and demonstrate the western valleys as the Native American’s experienced them thousands of years ago.

The Oregon white oak (Quercus garryana) is important for two reasons. First, there is less than 1 percent of historic Willamette Valley native oak habitats still exists. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has identified oak woodlands and oak savannas as “Strategy Habitats” for the Willamette Valley. Metro has identified Oregon white oak savannas and white oak woodlands as “Habitats of Concern.”

Secondly, three birds and one squirrel are dependent on the Oregon white oak for habitat. These species are listed as Vulnerable Sensitive Species by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife – facing one or more threats to their populations and/or habitats. These Vulnerable Sensitive Species are the Acorn Woodpecker, the White-breasted Nuthatch, the Western Bluebird, and the Western Gray Squirrel.
According to the Oregon Conservation Strategy, the Oregon white oak provides food and shelter for a variety of our wildlife. Stanley H. Anderson notes in Northwest Science that “Oak-dominated forests in the western part of the Willamette Valley have a higher diversity of birds in all seasons than adjacent conifer forests.” This is because Oregon white oaks are open underneath their canopy, allowing for more food sources for birds, such as insects, compared to the closed, tight confines of conifers.
Oregon white oak trees played an important part in the early history of the area around Silverton. Mature oaks provided an abundance of food for the Molalla and Kalapuya tribes that inhabited this area. They boiled the acorns to remove the tannins, and then ground the acorns into meal or mush. This tree’s large acorns mature in one season, ripening from late August to November.

The oak woodland served as an important meeting place for the native tribes and early settlers. A Camas meadow is an important part of the native plants in the woodland and a source of carbohydrates for the people. Historically, Oregon white oaks provide a sense of place and are a significant part in the history of this area.

Hunting tips from ODFW

HUNTING SEASON REMINDERS & TIPS FROM OSP AND ODFW

With hunting season kicking into gear, the Oregon State Police Fish & Wildlife Division and the Department of Fish & Wildlife (ODFW) provide the following reminders and tips to keep your outdoor adventures memorable and trouble free:

* Oregon Disabilities Hunting Permit Information – Bag limits have changed in many of the Wildlife Management Units; particularly in regards to the harvest of antlerless deer, and in some cases antlerless elk. Many units now only allow subjects with Disabilities Permits to harvest legal bucks or bulls. Refer to page 88 of the 2012 Oregon Big Game Regulations (http://tinyurl.com/8hkke4646) for more information.

* Know Before You Go – Every hunting season law enforcement officers deal with many trespassing complaints because hunters go onto property without considering or knowing ownership, or they think it’s permissible to trespass when tracking a wounded animal or retrieving an animal from the other side of a property boundary or fence. REMEMBER: It is the responsibility of any hunter to know whose property they are on. Hunters need to contact the landowner and ask for permission prior to entering private property. The landowner has the right to deny access.

* Hunter Orange – Oregon requires youth hunters age 17 and under to wear hunter orange when hunting all game mammals and upland birds (except turkey) with any firearm. It’s also strongly recommended for adults, too. Refer to pages 6 and 27 of the 2012 Oregon Big Game Regulations for more information.

* Tagging and Possession – Oregon law requires hunters who harvest an animal to immediately validate the appropriate tag by completely removing the month and day the animal was harvested and securely attaching the tag to a portion of the animal.

* Please be Careful with Fire – Practice fire safety at all times. This year has been a busy fire season so be aware of any fire restrictions for the area you intend to hunt. You wouldn’t want to lose your home to a fire, and neither does the wildlife that call Oregon’s outdoors their home. Check with the land manager and see Oregon Department of Forestry’s webpage on private lands access and phone numbers of local districts to check fire restrictions.

* Respect Road Closures – Road closures are in place to conserve wildlife and improve the hunting experience. It’s very important to respect closures on private land so access to hunters remains open.

* Report Wildlife Violations – You can help protect Oregon’s wildlife and natural resources by reporting violations. If you observe someone violating the law in the field please call the Turn in Poachers (TIP) line at 1-800-452-7888. Helpful information includes the date, time, location, type of violation, a description of the subject(s), and any information if a vehicle is involved, including a license plate number if possible. Rewards may be offered for information leading to the prosecution of violators through the TIP Reward Fund sponsored by the Oregon Hunter’s Association.

* Alcohol & Firearms Don’t Mix – Many hunting accidents in Oregon each year are preventable, and alcohol is often a factor in these incidents. Wait to celebrate your daily hunting adventures at the end of the day when weapons are safely secured at home or in camp. Always remember and practice basic firearms safety:
– Keep your firearm’s muzzle pointed in a safe direction.
– Keep your finger outside of the trigger guard until ready to shoot.
– Treat every firearm as if it were loaded.
– Be sure of your target and what is in front of it and beyond it.
– Wear blaze orange.

Questions can be directed to your local office of the Oregon State Police or Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife.

(Note: You can follow Oregon State Police on Twitter @ORStatePolice. If you are not a Twitter user you can also follow Oregon State Police at www.twitter.com/ORStatePolice and ODFW at www.twitter.com/ODFW.)

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Coast Tree

audiology title=

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Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

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audiology title=

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Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

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