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Where future wave energy devices are destined to be placed along the Oregon Coast is still very clouded.

Salishan Resort, Member David Allen, also member of OPAC, Priorities of Wave Energy Placements, lower numbers mean higher ranksings

Where future wave energy devices are to be placed, whether on the surface or on the ocean floor, is still very much unknown even after the final meeting of those trying to make such recommendations. Oregon’s Territorial Sea Plannning Committee (TSP) wrapped up five years of hard work at trying to find places along the Oregon Coast where the budding wave energy industry can test and ultimately position their wave energy devices to help meet the country’s green energy goals set by the federal government.

Mirroring discussions earlier last month in Newport, top location candidates decided by TSP members Thursday are in order of importance; 1-Camp Rialea at Warrenton, 2-Lakeside (Coos County), 3-Reedsport at a near-shore location, 4-Langlois (south of Reedsport), 5-Pacific City/Nestucca, 6-Newport (north of Yaquina Head), 7-Gold Beach and 8-Netarts in Tillamook County.

Committee member, commercial fisherman and Lincoln County Commissioner Terry Thompson strenuously protested Newport still being in the running for a wave energy development site. Thompson said the Lincoln County coastline has already had fishing areas removed to accomodate marine reserve study areas along with other withdrawals in addition to having already committed to withdrawing more good crabbing areas to make way for an OSU wave energy testing area off South Beach. Thompson said to add more areas for fishing grounds withdrawals is unacceptable.

However, Thompson was not the only representative of a coastal community decrying what’s been described as the “forced accommodating of potential wave energy sites” by state officials. TSP representatives from the Port of Coos Bay strongly complained that they were on the chopping block to lose three or four lucrative fishing areas to future wave energy operations and that such losses for them are also unacceptable.

Discussions then centered around the idea that none of Oregon’s deep water ports should have to cough up more than two locations. Thompson piped up again saying that what matters is which area’s have already given up their fair share of fishing areas.

In a move that could be interpreted as Newport being thrown under the bus, a majority of the committee voted that there should be no more than two lost areas to each of the three deep water ports, Astoria, Newport and Coos Bay. Since Newport is counting on OSU’s proposed test site off South Beach to count as one of those sites, it could technically mean that Newport could lose at least one or maybe even two more fishing areas to energy development depending on how higher ranking state officials view the political calculus. Further complicating the politics is that the OSU site is tentatively expected to be placed beyond the three mile limit of the Territorial Sea which is far better suited for wave energy testing.

Other discussions produced an observation that when wave energy companies begin applying for permits to put their devices in the water, they may prefer some areas over others which could further cloud the issue by clumsily violating the effort to spread the pain equally among the coast’s three major ports.

So, in the end, the Territorial Sea Planning Committee (TSP) generally agreed to ranking target areas (listed above) that will be passed on to the next review panel, the Ocean Policy Advisory Committee (OPAC). OPAC, of which TSP member and Newport City Councilor David Allen (pictured) is a member, will review the TSP report, take further public testimony, and then make its own recommendations to the Oregon Land Conservation and Development Commission (LCDC). The LCDC will review it all again and decide how all this should work out. From there the final configuration would be wrapped into in a bill and be given to the legislature to make the final plan part of state statutes regulating Oregon’s territorial waters. But before the legislature finalizes anything, the proposed plan will be presented and publicly debated in legislative committees, passed by the state house and senate, and then would have to be signed by the governor before it could become law. And, of course, in these litigious times, if any industry or other group isn’t happy with the results or believed their needs or interests were trampled, they could file a lawsuit and possibly tie the plan up for years.

Hovering over this uncertainty is the shadow of the federal government which has plans of its own to allow wave AND wind energy development in federal waters from just beyondOregon’s territorial three mile limit out to 12 miles. There are enormous sums of money to be made in green energy development requiring large subsidies from the federal government to make wind and wave energy pencil out in order to reduce the country’s over-reliance on fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas. These mountainous subsidies allow wind and wave energy projects to turn a profit because the power generated by wave and wind devices is very costly. Although they work, their cost per kilowatt hour of energy is many times that of hydroelectric dams, coal and natural gas power plants.

Critics contend that the whole process should slow down long enough for research and development to produce wave energy devices that can produce power at much lower cost thereby reducing federal subsidies, especially in an era of calls, if not shouting, to reduce the nation’s budget deficit. State and local officials who have participated in Oregon’s Territorial Sea Planning saga over the past five years say it’s highly unlikely that any wave energy company will be applying for a permit to launch their energy devices off the Oregon Coast for another seven to ten years. They have much more designing and testing to do before they can fire them up.

Therefore nobody is predicting that any of today’s commercial, sports or recreational fishing will be changing much over that time even if future research and development eventually produces more cost-effective wave energy devices and brings down costs to something more reasonable requiring lower or no federal subsidies.

Judge gives Julie Anne Hubeny 5 years prison for her participation in a case that was related to the SWAT death of young Sam Mullane up Ten Mile

Julie Anne Hubeny, 5 years prison

Judge Sheryl Bachart sentenced Yachats resident Julie Anne Hubaney to five years in state prison Thursday for participating in a series of events May 10th that led to the beating of Sam Youngblood of Yachats. Hubeny was given the five years for, as Judge Bachart noted, bringing a gun to the scene and menacing Youngblood. Her son Matthew Hubeny was sentenced earlier this year to over three years in prison for assaulting Youngblood with a table leg. Co-suspect Justin Wood was charged with unlawful use of a weapon, menacing and tampering with evidence.

Hubeny’s lawyer David Beal suggested to the judge that a five year prison sentence did not match the crime since Hubeny never pointed the gun at anyone, which investigators claimed happened and was therefore erroneously reported in the news media. Judge Bachart said the unlawful use of a gun is a serious offense and that by merely bringing the gun to the scene Hubeny accelerated the course of events that led to the beating of Youngblood.

Hubeny was led away by sheriff’s deputies to the county jail where she will be prepared for transport to a state womens’ prison.

Outside the courtroom Beal said Hubeny will appeal her sentence on grounds that the sentence does not match the circumstances, adding again that his client never aimed her gun at anyone. He also said Hubeny will be appealing her conviction.

Three weeks later, the Oregon State Police SWAT team surrounded a home up Ten Mile Road just over the Lane County line, south of Yachats. SWAT was told that two suspects in the Youngblood beating, Matt Hubeny, Julie Anne Hubeny’s son, and Justin Wood, were hold up in the house of Sam Mullane, 18. The SWAT team arrived at Ten Mile and Highway 101 at around 11pm and began their attempt to serve a search warrant to apprehend Hubeny and Wood. But as they began to surround the house, Mullane emerged from the front door holding a long rifle, pointed in the air. He called out, asking who is out there? SWAT responded ordering the young man to drop his rifle. Instead, they said, Mullane turned around and headed in a direction that would put him behind an outbuilding while the SWAT team had no cover to run to. They said Mullane continued walking while SWAT again told him to stop and put down his rifle. SWAT said it was at that moment that they considered the possibility that Mullane would get cover behind the outbuilding and be able to open fire on several officers who still had nothing to provide them cover. They opened fire on Mullane. He fell to the ground, mortally wounded.

Meanwhile suspect Justin Wood ran out the back door and into the woods and escaped. Hubeny came out of the house and was arrested. A female was also inside, questioned and then released. Wood was captured two days later walking toward Yachats on a Forest Service Road.

An investigation by the Lane County District Attorney’s Office cleared the SWAT team members of any wrong doing, citing Mullane’s refusal to obey lawfully given orders to stop and lay down his weapon. The DA said Mullane’s non-compliance precipitated the SWAT team’s fear for their lives because Mullane continued to move toward cover, leaving them out in the open.

Lincoln County Historical Society announces maritime-related art exhibition at opening of the Pacific Maritime & and Heritage Center next summer.

Slipper Rock, 1935, Cornelius Salisbury
Near Jump Off Joe, Newport

MICHAEL GIBBONS AND HISTORICAL SOCIETY ANNOUNCE JURIED ART EXHIBITION
FOR PACIFIC MARITIME & HERITAGE CENTER

Michael Gibbons, artist and curator of the Yaquina River Museum of Art, will join with the Lincoln County Historical Society to conduct a juried exhibition for maritime-related art. Jury selections will be displayed in an exhibit in the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center when it opens early summer 2013.

The juried art exhibit will be just one section of the opening exhibit, “Ship to Shore: Objects of a Maritime Community,” which will feature a diversity of stories and objects from the local community ranging from commercial fishing gear to art.

Any medium and all artists are welcome to participate in the juried exhibition, but the theme must be maritime-related and focus on the Central Oregon Coast. Art remains the property of the artist, but the artist must be willing to lend the piece to the Society for a year-long exhibit at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center. In the interest of long-term preservation of our regional history in art, artists may donate or arrange for the gift of accepted art for the Society’s collection and use in future exhibits. Artist submitting the work must hold all rights to the works. Up to six works may be submitted for consideration.

Digital images of the art should be submitted as jpegs on CD with a description of the work and the media used. Deadline for submissions is March 1, 2013. Disks should be sent or delivered to Michael Gibbons at 140 NE Alder, Toledo or to the Burrows House Museum, 545 SW Ninth, Newport. For more information, call 541-265-7509 or 541-336-2797 or e-mail coasthistory@newportnet.com or michaelgibbonsart@charter.net.

The Lincoln County Historical Society is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation and interpretation of the history of Lincoln County. It operates the Burrows House and Log Cabin museums located at 545 SW Ninth Street in Newport. The museums are free and open to the public. The Burrows House Museum is open Tuesday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.; the Log Cabin Museum is open Thursday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Toledo: Police pursuit ends in crash of the fleeing car on NW Sunset Drive near French Avenue

When a Toledo Police Officer tried to pull a car over for a traffic infraction early Thursday morning, the officer said the car’s female driver stepped on it and pulled away. The officer pursued the car up Sunset Drive, passing French Avenue but then saw the car straighten out the curve as Sunset bends sharply northeast. The car left the road, went over an embankment and was stopped below by thick brush and trees. The officer managed to help the woman get out. Arriving paramedics put the woman, who was said to be “semi-local,” onto a gurney and loaded her into an awaiting ambulance. Her injuries did not appear to be major.

When she’s discharged from the hospital in Newport she is expected to be arrested on charges of eluding an officer and possibly drunk driving. There is also a warrant for her arrest for violating probation in connection with drug related matters. Her name was not immediately released.

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