WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY


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County Commissioners set up more transitional housing for paroled ex-offenders

Converted half-way house for ex-offenders just across SE 10th from Newport City Hall and Recreation Center.

The Lincoln County Board of Commissioners has approved the purchase of a five-bedroom house in Newport for use as additional post-release (from jail)  transitional housing.

The vacant home, located at 168 SE 10th Street, Newport, was previously operated as a group home and has three bathrooms.  It’s across the street from Newport City Hall and Recreation Center.  Purchase price is $347,500, with the money coming from state funding for parole and probation.

Initially, the county will be able to house five male probationers at the property, but with future modifications, it may be possible to house as many as ten individuals at the site.

Board Chair Claire Hall, the supervising commissioner for the department said, “This is a great win-win. We’re going to improve community safety and help people get their lives back on track.  It’s important that our half-way houses are close to parole, mental health and counseling services which are centered near the downtown area.  There are counselors that live in the half-way house with the parolees and they closely monitor their comings and goings.”

The County’s community justice program already operates three homes for offenders released from custody, with a total of 28 available beds, but department director Tony Campa says there’s a long waiting list for these facilities.

Campa said each probationer will have an assessment with a program designed to meet their individual needs. “Each individual will have “wrap-around” services geared towards their needs, as different treatment programs work for different people.”

He added that the new house will be targeted to serve men experiencing mental health disorders, substance abuse, homelessness, or a combination of all three.

2nd Annual Teak Lady Sail

The Port of Toledo’s fleet of Teak Ladies will be sailing up the Yaquina River on May 25, 2019. This is the 2nd year volunteers and friends of the Port of Toledo will sail the three sister vessels from Newport to Toledo. Each of these beautiful, 17-foot sail boats have been donated to the Port by their previous owners for use in the Toledo Community Boathouse program. Any boats are welcome to join the procession.

The Teak Ladies will arrive at Port of Newport’s Commercial Dock 3 late in the afternoon on Thursday, May 23 and will be on display until their departure Saturday, May 25 a 12:00pm. The boats will sail upriver to their home dock at the Port of Toledo’s marina, providing many opportunities to view the boats from the Bay Road.

The Teak Ladies are maintained and sailed by members of the Teak Lady Society, a group of volunteers working under the leadership of David West and local boatwright Rick Johnson. Johnson and West have just completed repairs on Ma Zu and given her a fresh coat of varnish and paint. They were assisted by Toledo High School vocational student, Jacob Rogers.

The Teak Lady sloop was designed by Fenton Kelkenny of San Francisco and modeled after larger yachts. The A. King Slipway in Hong Kong was commissioned to build the boats between the years of 1939 and 1958. They were built of hand sawn teak and feature custom carved tillers, carved name plates, and hand crafted brass ventilators. In the 1940’s the Teak Ladies had their own sailing class in San Francisco Bay.

These three boats have been donated to the Port of Toledo for use by the Toledo Community Boathouse. In 2009, Jim and Carolyn Hitchman of Waldport, Oregon donated Ma Zu to the Port. Ma Zu was built in 1958 and is also known as Teak Lady #21. In 2011, Robert and Claire McDonald of Spokane, WA donated Che Hon, built in 1939, also known as Teak Lady 11. The most recent addition to the fleet is donated by David West, and is the prototype Teak Lady, named Yuan Mun built in 1937. West found Yuan Mun in San Francisco when researching the history of the Teak Ladies.

For more information about the Teak Lady Sail or the Wooden Boat Show please contact the Port’s office at 541-336-5207 or email info@portoftoledo.org

No date has been set yet for the new group home to become operational but Hall and Campa expressed hope that it will be soon. The County’s pre-purchase inspection of the property found only minor repair needs.

Samaritan Report shows $161 Million in local health investment

North Lincoln Hospital
Lincoln City

Samaritan report shows $161 million in local health investment

In 2018, Samaritan Health Services invested nearly $161 million in community health.
These investments are designed to help address activities that promote healthy families, greater access to health care, better networks, healthy kids, healthy teens and healthy seniors throughout Benton, Lincoln and Linn counties.

Samaritan makes this information available in its annual Community Health Impact Report. Available now, the 2018 report highlights the investments made in community health activities, such as free health screenings, services for low-income individuals, health-related research, training for health professionals and grants to local non-profits in support of health initiatives.

“As we complete these activities each year, we believe it’s important to report back to the community regarding progress that has been made in each goal area,” said Doug Boysen, president and CEO of Samaritan. “In this report, you’ll find success stories as well as data that will help illustrate how we are partnering with many others in our region to build healthier communities together. We are pleased to share these stories of hope and inspiration with our customers and partners.”

Learn how Samaritan’s contributions impacted local organizations, including Sweet Home Emergency Ministries, the Benton County Oral Health Coalition, the Center Against Rape and Domestic Violence, Yachats Youth and Family Activities Program, Linn Together, Volunteer Caregivers and more.

Visit samhealth.org/Impact to read the report.

Senator Merkley introduces bill to expand wilderness areas in Eastern Oregon

Painted Hills
Eastern Oregon

Senator Merkley Introduces The Sutton Mountain and Painted Hills Area Preservation and Economic Enhancement Act

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon’s Senator Jeff Merkley today introduced the Sutton Mountain and Painted Hills Area Preservation and Economic Enhancement Act, legislation to create federal wilderness in the area of Sutton Mountain and the iconic Painted Hills, and to promote economic development in the surrounding area.

These new wilderness areas will offer extensive recreation opportunities, such as day hikes, backpacking trips, river floats, horseback rides, fishing, and hunting, expanding the local recreation and tourism economy. They also encompass a diversity of habitat types including grasslands, riparian areas, sagebrush shrub steppe, woodlands, and forests.

The proposal, which was developed in close collaboration with the Wheeler County community, would create new economic opportunities and designate cherished public land in Oregon as wilderness to protect it for future generations.

“With this legislation, we’ll make sure that future generations will experience some of Oregon’s most incredible landmarks—while also creating jobs and economic opportunities in the county now,” Merkley said. “I thank local community members for their impressive work in developing this proposal, and I will continue to do everything I can to be a strong federal partner and put these plans into action.”

Additionally, the legislation will empower the surrounding region to create jobs and grow the local economy by providing 2,000 acres of land for the City of Mitchell to pursue economic development projects that will help attract and host more visitors. The types of projects under consideration for that land—such as an RV park, search and rescue training facilities, or an air strip—will help make the region a more attractive and accommodating destination for travelers, who in turn will spend money in the local communities and help boost local business.

“In Mitchell, we’ve seen how protected places like the Painted Hills can help the economy through visitation, and we believe Sutton Mountain Wilderness can do the same,” said fifth-generation Mitchellite Robert Cannon, who co-owns the Tiger Town Brewery on property passed down from his grandfather.

“Our community has worked for years to develop a vision for how the proposal to protect Sutton Mountain and convey the Golden Triangle to the City of Mitchell will improve our economic future,” said Sutton Mountain working group member and local landowner Bob Mair. “With Senator Merkley’s leadership we are one step closer to realizing this dream.”

The legislation would designate roughly 58,000 acres of wilderness on four new tracts in Wheeler County independently known as Sutton Mountain, Pat’s Cabin, Painted Hills, and Dead Dog. These tracts of public land would provide recreational access and views to Sutton Mountain, the Painted Hills and John Day Fossil Beds National Monument, and additionally connect to the Wild and Scenic John Day River.

 

 

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