WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

lazerrose title=

audiology title=

barrelhead

prp

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc

audiology title=

barrelhead
prp

oceancreek

Coast Tree

Sema Roofing

wandr

occc


barrelhead


Coast Tree

flocs

Removal crew starting work on Agate Beach Japanese dock next Tuesday


Japanese Dock, Agate Beach

Story from State Parks and Recreation

A crew from Ballard Diving and Salvage of Vancouver, WA will begin removing the derelict dock at Agate Beach starting the morning of Tuesday, July 31. The beach will remain open to the public during the work, except for a closed safety zone around the dock demolition site. The project will take three to seven days depending on tide and safety needs. The 66’ long, 19’ wide, 7’ tall dock washed ashore early the morning of June 4 and is believed to weigh 130-165 tons. It originated from the Japanese port city of Misawa in the Aomori Prefecture, and was carried out to sea during the March 2011 tsunami.

Ballard was awarded a contract for $84,155 to complete the work. The firm is responsible for removing the dock, recycling or disposing of the material, and restoring the work site on the beach. To minimize damage to the beach, the salvage experts plan to cut the dock into several large pieces, place them on a heavy-haul truck at the main Agate Beach access road, and transport them to a Portland-area facility for final demolition and recycling. The work site will have 24-hour security, and portions of the beach may temporarily close as sections of the dock are transported to the road (less than a half mile south of the dock). Biologists from the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife will inspect the bottom of the dock as it is removed for possible invasive species.

Residents and visitors can expect congestion in and around the Agate Beach State Park, Highway 101 and NW Oceanview Drive during the project. The main Agate Beach parking lot will be open, but the smaller, roadside parking area will be closed for the duration of the work starting Monday, July 30.

The Oregon Parks and Recreation Department is responsible for maintaining the beach in as natural a state as possible. When boats and structures wash ashore — and they do every year — they are removed. Park staff and thousands of volunteers also put in tens of thousands of hours of effort to remove smaller pieces of debris to preserve Oregon’s beautiful beaches. Individuals or groups interested in volunteering for future beach cleanups can visit http://bit.ly/MvxUI4 . A list of upcoming beach cleanups (and other events) is online at http://solv.org/get-involved/volunteer-event.

barrelhead


Coast Tree

flocs

Coast Tree

flocs

Coast Tree

flocs

nlcad

Follow-us-tile