WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 

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Steve Power: McCabe Church on the hill…Yamhill Valley


McCabe Church
Steve Power photop

Photographer Steve Power decided to stop riding the bullet train on Highway 18 and get off onto some side roads. He says the views are very different and very beautiful. Here’s a shot of one of the splendid scenes that he wanted to share with us!

Upon seeing Steve’s beautiful photo, Joyce O’Dell-Lehmer provided access to a website that contains a brief history of the namesake of the church:

Charles Cardwell McCabe
Oct 11, 1836 – Dec 19, 1906

McCabe was born and raised in Ohio and taught school for a short time after receiving a degree from Ohio Wesleyan University in 1860. The same year he married Rebecca Peters and a son was born to them the next year. But, in September 1862, as the Civil War was developing, he helped raise a regiment for the Union Army and served as chaplain for the 122nd Ohio Volunteer Infantry.

He was eventually captured by the confederates and sent to Libby Prison in Richmond, Virginia becoming chaplain to the other prisoners of war. To rally their spirits he would lead them in singing, which, according to his biographer, Frank M. Bristol, could often be heard beyond the walls of the prison. A favorite song was, ‘The Battle Hymn of the Republic’. McCabe had memorized the lyrics, written by Julia Ward Howe to the tune of the raucous ‘John Brown’s Body’ song, when they were published in the February 1862 edition of the Atlantic Monthly.

McCabe contracted typhoid fever in prison, then, became part of a prisoner exchange resulting in his release. Ill health forced his resignation from the 122nd. Upon recovering, he worked as a fundraiser for the Christian Commission often singing, ‘The Battle Hymn of the Republic”. An accomplished vocalist credited with popularizing the song, McCabe became known as the ‘singing chaplain’. President Lincoln attended a meeting in Washington D.C. where he heard McCabe’s story of being a prisoner of war, afterwards joining in the singing of ‘The Battle Hymn’. McCabe wrote to his wife that when the singing stopped, “Some shouted out loud at the last verse, and above all the uproar Mr. Lincoln’s voice was heard: “Sing it again!” The following year, McCabe was invited to sing the song at Lincoln’s Illinois funeral services. Years later, McCabe would receive a hand-written copy of the lyrics from Howe. The song was ultimately sung at the funerals of both Howe and McCabe.

After the war, many churches called on McCabe for help with their finances. In a journal entry, he writes, “I seem doomed to raise money.” He toured the country singing, evangelizing and speaking about ‘The Bright Side of Life at Libby Prison’. The actual speech varied with the audience but, as a fundraiser, it was a huge success.

In his later years, McCabe co-edited several hymnals. He was appointed Bishop of the Methodist Episcopal Church in 1896, and, as part of his job, traveled extensively both nationally and internationally, sometimes covering 80,000 miles in a year. In 1902 he became Chancellor of the American University, primarily a fundraising position, as the Methodist-affiliated institution did not begin accepting students until 1914. He died in New York in 1906.

post note: Though Charles Cardwell McCabe was appointed a bishop in the Methodist Episcopal church, he was so well thought of by so many people that when he moved from being a Chaplain to a Bishop, most people continued to call him Chaplain McCabe as a term of endearment. Even his biography is entitled, ‘The Life of Chaplain McCabe’. So, with all due respect to his role as Bishop, we are referring to him, as we suspect he might have preferred we all refer to him, as Chaplain McCabe.

 

 

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