WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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NOAA Tsunami Debris Report: Arrives Hawaii Spring 2012, U.S. West Coast 2013.

US Navy photo
Click photo to enlarge

Debris from the Japanese Tsunami of March 11th is now well out to sea in the Pacific, riding on the dominant currents that will bring some of that debris easterly toward Hawaii and then to the North American Coastline, including the U.S. A NOAA tsunami debris update predicts that the northern most Hawaiian Islands, including Kauai and Oaha (Honolulu) could see some of the debris as early as this Spring. However, NOAA predicts the arrival of the debris on the U.S. West Coast may be mid-to-late 2013 but then circle back to Hawaii in 2014 to 2016, again depending on prevailing currents.

NOAA scientists predict the debris will be broken up into very small pieces and will arrive as dispersed floating pieces of material. They say it won’t look like a debris field or arrive in any organized fashion. Scientists predict that none of the debris is likely to be radioactive since most of the debris was sucked out to sea before the Japanese nuclear power plant began spewing radioactivity into the air and water.

Those on the look out for the Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris can report their sightings and findings to NOAA’s marine debris website. It is MDSightings@gmail.com. For more information about what to look for, go to NOAA’s marine debris website at MarineDebris.NOAA.gov/info/japanfaqs.html

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