WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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Lincoln County Schools Report Card – Still more work to be done…

Oregon Report Card: Lincoln County Schools Continue Upward Trend
School District Statement on Schools Report Card from Oregon Department of Education

Lincoln County School District officials are encouraged by results of the annual School Report Card, which shows that individual student achievement continues to improve, as does the overall quality of local public schools. “In reviewing the data, we see the majority of our schools are trending upward, even with the academic bar being raised,” said Assistant Superintendent Dr. Sara Johnson. “We applaud our schools that are rated as outstanding, and we will continue to provide the necessary support and resources to our other schools so they can attain that highest rating, as well.”

The 2010-2011 School Report Cards and District Report Cards were released on Oct. 6 by the Oregon Department of Education. They show that three LCSD schools were rated as outstanding – Crestview Heights in Waldport, Isaac Newton Magnet School in Newport, and Newport High. This is the third consecutive year for Crestview Heights to attain the top rating, and the seventh year in a row for Isaac Newton.

Nine of the district’s schools were rated as satisfactory: Eddyville Charter, Newport Intermediate, Newport Preparatory Academy, Oceanlake Elementary in Lincoln City, Sam Case Primary in Newport, Taft Elementary in Lincoln City, Toledo Elementary, Toledo Junior/Senior High, and Waldport High.

Two schools were rated as in need of improvement: Siletz Valley Charter and Taft 7-12 High in Lincoln City.

Two of the district’s schools, Lincoln City Career Tech High and Siletz Valley Early College Academy, were not rated because of insufficient data.
(Editor’s note: Very small number of students)

To determine the overall school rating, the state uses a formula that includes the school’s achievement index, improvement index, graduation rate (for high schools) or attendance rate (for elementary/middle schools), the participation rate of students taking the state academic assessment tests, and the school’s Adequate Yearly Progress status.

Johnson explains that Taft High School received its low rating largely due to its graduation rates from the 2008-2009 and the 2009-2010 school years. Specific strategies were implemented a few years ago to address the graduation rates. “When we recognized that Taft High needed to improve its graduation rate, we explored ways to not only keep students in school, but to keep them interested in school, and to help them learn,” Johnson said.
Taft students attend school four days a week, but their school day is longer than other high schools in the district, with a strong focus on proficiency- and standards-based learning; this means that students must meet minimum competencies in core subject areas before being promoted, and must redo their work until they are proficient on each standard. Students who need additional assistance are required to attend school on Fridays. Preliminary data on the 2010-2011 graduation rate indicates that Taft High will meet the graduation target for the 2011-2012 Report Card.
“We anticipate that next year’s report card for Taft High School will result in the school attaining satisfactory status, if not better,” Johnson said.

As for Siletz Valley Charter School’s low rating, LCSD administrators are working closely with their staff to provide support. “Although the Siletz charter schools are largely autonomous, we gladly collaborate with them as requested to ensure that all students in our district have the same opportunity to receive a quality education,” Johnson said.

Clarifying the Different Academic Reports

The Oregon Department of Education issues three major reports each fall showing student academic achievement, according to LCSD Data Coordinator Mary Kelly. They are AYP, OAKS, and the School Report Card. “There are many reporting tools that help us keep track of how well we are educating our children,” she said. “It can be confusing to the lay person as the reports overlap somewhat, and the data is used and interpreted in different ways.
“What is most important to know about these reports is that they help us to identify our areas of strength and areas needing improvement,” Kelly continued. “In the past few years, an incredible amount of our district resources have been devoted to improving student achievement and to meeting the new, higher goals mandated by the state. We are proud of our progress, but continually strive to be better.”

Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP): AYP is a key part of the federal No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB). Under the act, schools are expected to meet state-set goals based on student achievement data collected by the state assessment system. The AYP report issued on Sept. 2 shows that nine of Lincoln County School District’s 16 schools met AYP.

Oregon Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (OAKS): In August, Oregon announced results of student performance on the 2010-2011 OAKS testing. The OAKS report shows the aggregate performance of all tested students by grade, school and district. “We are making growth as a district,” Kelly says. “Our reading assessment shows a gain of 2.6 percent from 2009-10 to 2010-11 in the number of students meeting or exceeding benchmark. In Math, It’s difficult to ascertain our growth or decline due to the raised score bar the state set in 10-11; the data does not correlate to the 2009-10 scores. However, data simulations which calculate our 10-11 scores, based on the 09-10 benchmarks, reflect a slight gain in math, as well.”

Oregon Report Card: Of the three reports, the Oregon Report Card offers the most complete look at how students and schools are performing, Kelly says. This is because the schools are rated on an individual student growth model which was designed by the Oregon Department of Education. The report also includes a more thorough review of school quality, including, attendance, teacher education, and more.

All three reports are available online, for current and past years, on the Oregon Department of Education website (www.ode.state.or.us). Links can also be found on the Lincoln County School District website (www.lincoln.k12.or.us).

Anyone with questions about school data may contact Kelly by email at mary.kelly@lincoln.k12.or.us or call her at 541-265-4440.

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