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Coastal Progressives Update

Announcements for September 15th

IIRT meets Saturday
The next meeting of the Immigration Information Response Team of the Coastal Progressives will be this Saturday, Sept. 17, 11 a.m., at the Centro de Ayuda office, 410 SW 9th in Newport. The agenda will include planning for our screening of Not in Our Town: Light in the Darkness on Tuesday, Sept. 20 (see under Reminders, below); planning for our meeting with Sheriff Dotson, a report on our new online news source in Spanish with Yaquina Wavelength, and continued efforts to keep Lincoln County a Welcoming Community for all its residents.
Everyone interested in human rights and dignity in our community is invited to join us.
–Joanne Cvar cvar@peak.org

Tonight: Migration, Globalization, and Changing Communities
The Newport Public Library will host “Borderless: Migration, Globalization, and Changing Communities,” a Conversation Project led by Lewis & Clark College Professor Elliott Young on Thursday, Sept, 15, (today) at 7 p.m.
This program addresses the question of how local communities in the twenty-first century can think in new ways about the relationship between migration and globalization and their effects on Oregon communities.
Young was born in New York City and has been migrating westward ever since. He has conducted research and done community development work in Cuba, Mexico, Nicaragua, Paraguay, and Ecuador. Young has been a professor of Latin American and borderlands history at Lewis & Clark College in Portland since 1997.
This Conversation Project is sponsored by Oregon Humanities, an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities and a partner of the Oregon Cultural Trust, with additional help from The Whaler.
For more information about this program, call the Newport Library at 541.265.2153 or check its website, www.newportlibrary.org.

Drumming for Peace
The Newport Community Drum Circle’s last Tuesday night summer drum circle of the season, on Sept. 20, will be dedicated to international peace and the memory of the victims–civilian and military, regardless of “sides”–of war and armed conflict.
Drum circle coordinator Chandler Davis said the Sept. 20 drum circle, from 6-8 p.m., at Don Davis Park, will be co-sponsored again this year by Newport’s Interfaith Community for Peace and Justice, and will celebrate the United Nations’ International Week of Peace (Sept. 11 through Sept. 21).
Davis said he will bring “peace rhythms” from various cultures and invited participants to bring brief songs, poems, or “drummable” rhythms that represent peace for them. All ages are welcome for the free, non-denominational event and there will be percussion instruments available to borrow for those who don’t have a drum.
The drum circle resumes its regular monthly winter schedule at the park in October, meeting every second Saturday afternoon from 2 to 4 p.m. through April. The park is located at 840 W. Olive St., just west of the Newport Performing Arts Center.
For details on International Peace Week events in Newport, see below, or contact Jeanne St John at jstjohn1@charter.net. For drum circle information contact chandler@chandlerdavis.com

Democrats host talk on wave energy
Many of us locally know what it feels like to be at sea in weather bad enough to make a
3,000 ton oceanographic vessel bob around like a rubber duck. Even more of us have
wondered whether such power could be adequately harnessed and help displace power sources which pollute the air and acidify the oceans.
A Scottish company, Aquamarine Power, was set up in 2005 to bring an
innovative wave energy technology, known as Oyster, to the commercial market. At 7 p.m. on Sept. 28, their Oregon Outreach Coordinator, Theresa Wisner, will give a
presentation on Oyster wave energy at the public meeting room of the Central Lincoln People’s Utilities District office in Newport.
Central Lincoln PUD is located at 2129 North Coast Highway in Newport (across US 101 from Safeway.) Meetings of the Lincoln County Democratic Central Committee are free and open to the public. For more information, call Chair Dan Beck at 541-994-4694, or go to the group’s website, www.lcdcc.org.

You are invited
Duncan and Melany Barry cordially invite you to a Garden Party with
Oregon Congressman Kurt Schrader on Wednesday Sept. 28, 5:30-7:00 p.m., at the Connie Hanson Garden, 1931 NW 33rd Street, 540 NE Highway 101, in Lincoln City for light snacks and wine.
This is a fundraiser for Kurt Schrader for Congress. A donation is suggested.
R.S.V.P. 541-994-9444

Celebrate National Estuary Day
The MidCoast Watersheds Council is joining the National Estuary Day celebration this year on Saturday, Sept. 24, with an evening cruise on Yaquina Bay. Please join us for this event, as we renew our commitment to estuarine habitat conservation and restoration. We will be cruising on the Marine Discovery, enjoying appetizers, fine Oregon wines, and local beers as we view local wildlife, visit restoration sites and review opportunities for future restoration work. Proceeds support our habitat restoration program.
For details and instructions, contact Lisa Mulcahy, Yaquina Basin Planning Team Coordinator for the Mid Coast Watersheds Council at 541-264-0572 or yaquinawatershedcouncil@gmail.com. You can also visit
http://www.midcoastwatershedscouncil.org/ or their Facebook page at
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Yaquina-WatershedCouncil/102884233094720?v=wall
Dedicated to improving the health of streams and watersheds of Oregon’s central coast

Behind the scenes at the Oregon Coast Aquarium:
The role of scientific diving and volunteer divers in the Aquarium and beyond.
The Yachats Academy of Arts and Sciences, supported by the Friends of the Yachats Commons Foundation, is proud to present Vallorie Hodges, Dive Safety Officer for the Oregon Coast Aquarium, for an inside look at how marine animals are captured and cared for at the Aquarium. The event will take place on Saturday, Sept. 24, at 6:30 p.m., in the Yachats Commons, 4th St. and Hwy. 101, in Yachats.
Hodges, as the Dive Safety Officer, is responsible for over 150 divers in the program. With 15 years experience as a Scientific Diver, 25 years as a scuba instructor, and over 7,000 logged dives from Alaska to Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, she has been a commercial diver, a public safety diver, an underwater investigator and is a member of the Women Divers Hall of Fame. She has studied sharks and Giant Pacific Octopus, and authored numerous articles and papers.
Scuba diving is a key element in the daily operations of the Oregon Coast Aquarium. Without this tool we would not be able to maintain the healthy animals and exhibits of this world-class facility or provide that spectacular “wow” factor our visitors have come to appreciate.
Volunteer divers have served a vital function for the Aquarium for over a decade. Initially their skills were recruited to support Aquarists working in Passages of the Deep; assisting with the daily husbandry needs such as health checks, feeding, and cleaning the exhibits. As time has gone by, these roles have expanded to assist with other areas of the aquarium, including aviculturists in the Aviary, mammalogists in the pinniped and sea otter exhibits, and aquarists in the main building galleries. In recent years an interpretive dive program has been developed, using underwater communications equipment and full face masks, providing another way to interpret the exhibits and relay conservation messages to visitors.
The most recent addition to the list of achievements of the volunteer divers is the establishment of a research dive team that has reached beyond the aquarium, conducting surveys and providing early detection of invasive species. This multidisciplinary team has worked with various government agencies and through their efforts provided the first positive identification of several species of invasive tunicates on the Oregon Coast.
What will the next 10 years of the dive program bring for the Aquarium and the wider community? This presentation will explore these behind-the-scenes activities and provide a unique view of the Oregon Coast Aquarium.
There is no admission charge for this presentation, but a $5 donation will help offset publicity costs. Information is available at www.GoYachats.com or by calling 541-961-6695.

Message from State Rep. Jean Cowan
Today I am announcing that I will not seek re-election for the 2013 term as the State Representative for the newly realigned House District 10. I will, however, continue to serve in my position until I complete my third two-year term in December, 2012.
Prior to my election to the State Legislature, I served as a Lincoln County Commissioner for three terms. And, before Pat and I moved to Lincoln County in 1987, I served as a city councilor and mayor of Elgin, Oregon. After more than 20 years in elected offices, it is now time for me to step aside. I have sincerely enjoyed the opportunity to represent the citizens of House District 10, but it is now time for me to spend more time enjoying my grandchildren and sharing in their activities.
Our grandchildren are the reason that I sought the legislative office in the first place. I wanted to help the State of Oregon offer the same opportunities to my grandchildren as it did to Pat and me and our children. I wish I were convinced that we are fulfilling that commitment at the present time.
I am proud of my accomplishments which include being instrumental in securing state support and funding to aid the Port of Newport’s successful bid for the NOAA Marine Operations Center-Pacific facility, as well as funding for the Oregon Coast Community College’s new Aquarium Sciences building. Along with many other local residents I participated in the festivities celebrating the recent grand openings for both facilities. As the current chair of the Coastal Caucus, I am seeking balance between many competing marine activities. Those efforts continue to support additional marine research, protect valuable resources, and maintain a sustainable and economically vital harvest of the sea’s bounty.
During my time in office, the needs of seniors have also been a top priority for me, and I will continue to focus on senior issues during the remainder of my term. My recent appointment as co-chair of the Ways and Means Subcommittee for Human Services, and my role on the Governor’s Senior Services Advisory Council, allow me to focus most of my attention on maintaining as adequate a level of services as possible for our most vulnerable citizens. I am pleased that my decision to retire from public service at the end of my term will allow me to focus fully on my continuing responsibilities, without the distraction of another political campaign.
The Secretary of State is now accepting declarations of candidacy or petitions for nomination for the May 15, 2012 primary election; the filing period closes on March 6, 2012. Because I know that planning to seek public office requires thoughtful decision-making, I want to allow potentially interested individuals as much time as possible to consider this opportunity. I will be happy to discuss the opportunities and the challenges of public service with anyone who might be considering a run for this position.
–Jean Cowan rep.jeancowan@state.or.us 503-986-1410

Job opening at Jobs With Justice
We are now hiring for a part-time position that is mostly administrative. The deadline for applying is September 23, 2011. The position will begin October 17, 2011. For more information or an application, contact Portland Jobs with Justice at 503-236-5573, margaret@jwjpdx.org, or 6025 E Burnside, Portland, OR 97215.
Job Description: Jobs with Justice Systems Organizer
Jobs with Justice, a labor/community coalition of over 90 member organizations, two-thirds of whom are unions, is seeking a half-time systems organizer. Women and people of color are encouraged to apply. Applicants must have a demonstrated commitment to building a social justice movement in a labor, community or student setting. This may include volunteer experience. This position reports to the director of Portland Jobs With Justice.
Job duties will include:
* Database and phone tree management:
* Fundraising:
* Financial management:
* Technical Assistance for Communications:
Additional qualifications desired
* One year of organizing experience in the labor movement (can be as a rank and file organizer)
* Ability to motivate and inspire coalition members and rank and file workers
* Experience working in coalitions
* Bi-lingual in Spanish and English
* Experience with network technology
Benefits
* Prorated Medical and dental benefits
* Three weeks vacation
* Paid holidays
* 401 K with employer contribution based on budget year
* Some schedule flexibility and comp time
This is a 20-hour a week position. Salary range is $13,000 to $16,000 annually
We hope to be able to move it to a full-time position in the future.

Reminders:
Imagine Peace 2011: remaining events
Saturday, Sept. 17 10 a.m. Kids for Peace, Library Park
Music and stories with Peace Village Campers and Montessori School
Sunday, Sept. 18 Churches observe International Day of Peace
2 p.m. Poetry Readings about War and Peace Don Davis Park
Tuesday, Sept. 20 6 p.m. Yoga Peace Dance Newport Recreation Center
6-8 p.m. Drumming for Peace Don Davis Park
7-9 p.m. Not in Our Town: Light in the Darkness, film, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church (see below)
7-9 P.M. Peace Music at Café Mundo–Two Eleanors
Wednesday, Sept. 21 International Day of Prayer for Peace
Sacred Spaces for Individual and Labyrinth Meditation
11 a.m.-2 p.m. Sacred Heart Chapel and Labyrinth
8 a.m.-6 p.m. Samaritan Pacific Hospital Garden Labyrinth
Interfaith Gatherings for Peace Prayers
12-1:30 p.m. Meditation with Ruth Miller, Atonement Lutheran Church
2-3 p.m. Music and Prayers for Peace, First Presbyterian Church
— Interfaith Community for Peace and Justice jstjohn1@charter.net

Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness
As part of the programs planned locally for International Peace Week, the Immigration Information Response Team of Coastal Progressives is hosting a screening and public discussion of a new PBS documentary, Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness, at St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, SW 9th and Hurbert in Newport, on Monday, September 20 at 7 p.m.
The film screening will be followed by a discussion about what local residents can do to help keep Lincoln County an inclusive and Welcoming Community for all its residents. Spanish-language subtitles will be provided. For more information about the event, please contact Jorge Hernandez at Centro de Ayuda, 541 265 6216. For more information about Not In Our Town: Light in the Darkness, including the film trailer, visit NIOT.org.

Iris Pride
The Iris Pride Festival in Lincoln City is the first and only gay pride event on the Oregon Coast. The colorful Super Hero-themed Pride will take place the weekend of September 16-18th, 2011. For more information about Iris Pride, visit http://www.oregoncoast.org/iris-pride-festival.

An evening with Lauren Kessler
Kessler will lecture on Saturday, Sept. 17 at 7 p.m. in the second floor meeting room of the Nye Beach Visual Arts Center. 777 NW Beach Drive (across from the Nye Beach Turnaround). General admission is $6 at the door; students always admitted free. Light refreshments will be available.
The Writers’ Series open mic will take place following intermission. Audience members are encouraged to read, sing, or recite original work for up to five minutes. Open mic slots are available to the first 10 writers who sign up. No pre-registration required.
–Nye Beach Writers’ Series, Writers On The Edge | http://writersontheedge.org

Coast Conference features range of activities
Coastal science and conservation, plus a special cruise, tour and celebratory bonfire, will all be part of the 28th annual Coast Conference, taking place on Saturday, Sept. 17, in Newport. The Conference is sponsored by the nonprofit Oregon Shores Conservation Coalition, which is also celebrating its 40th anniversary as an advocate for coastal conservation.
Registration is now open on the group’s website, http://oregonshores.org/. Registration on the day of the conference begins at Newport’s Performing Arts Center at 9 a.m. Oregon Shores is also encouraging conference participants to begin their day by picking up beach debris as part of SOLV’s Fall Beach and Riverside Cleanup.
The conference kicks off with a 10 a.m. tour of the new Yaquina Bay facilities of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). The tour is free, but pre-registration is required.
The main portion of the conference begins at 11 a.m. in the Performing Arts Center (777 W. Olive St. in Newport). The morning portion will include the Oregon Shores general members’ meeting and an historical overview of the group’s 40-year-long efforts to preserve the coastal environment. A buffet lunch in the PAC’s lobby will be catered by Local Ocean, a Newport business which supports a local, sustainable fishing industry.
Afternoon speakers begin at 1:15 p.m. Two of the key presentations concern climate change and how it may affect Oregon’s coastal region.
The conference will also feature a 5:30 p.m. dinner cruise of Yaquina Bay with Marine Discovery Tours. Festivities will wind up with a bonfire at 7 p.m. in Nye Beach. Featured will be the old-time Americana band “Hot Milk.” This event is free, although pre-registration is requested.
Cost of the conference is $25 for members, $35 for non-members; lunch is an additional $15. The cruise, a fund-raiser for Oregon Shores, is $75 for members, $100 for non-members (including membership).
For more information about the conference, contact Pat Wolter, (503) 647-2012; pcwolter@comcast.net.

Planning for Coastal Climate Change
The next meeting of Oregon Shores’ Coastal Climate Change Adaptation Project is Sept. 21, 7 p.m. at the second-floor meeting room of the Newport Visual Arts Center. The first several meetings held by the project provided background information and laid the groundwork; at this next meeting, we’ll start to consider the planning options for addressing climate change and get into the real work of the project. If you haven’t been able to attend the meetings up ‘till now, due to summer activities or whatnot, it isn’t too late to get involved, and we could use several additional volunteers for each of the “core teams” (for Yachats/South County, Newport, and the county as a whole). The September meeting would be the time to plug in.
You are welcome to simply show up, but it would be best if you would contact either me or Paris Edwards, the volunteer coordinator, (541) 414-9371, paris@oregonshores.org, in advance, in order to catch up with some of the background.
–Phillip Johnson, (503) 754-9303, orshores@teleport.com

From that moment on, I was no longer a liberal, a believer in the self-correcting character of American democracy. I was a radical, believing that something fundamental was wrong in this country–not just the existence of poverty amidst great wealth, not just the horrible treatment of black people, but something rotten at the root. The situation required not just a new president or new laws, but an uprooting of the old order, the introduction of a new kind of society–cooperative, peaceful, egalitarian.
-Howard Zinn, from his 1994 memoir, You Can’t Be Neutral on a Moving Train.”

 

 

 

 

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