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Newport City Council exploring possible solutions to city problems…

Newport City Council

The Newport City Council spent Monday evening sorting through some important issues.  Off the top Thompson Sanitary told the Council that the company is exploring possible improvements – especially handling a moderate growth of trash, tossed food and other “throw-aways” which is causing a small increase in Thompson’s collection fees – something around a 6% increase which amounts to a $1.82 increase per month for residents who take their cans to the street.

Thompson crews are also tightening up their collection of paper and other discarded trash – especially along Lincoln County beaches. 

The Council also was reminded that Newport’s water system…from mountain lakes to toilets…needs an upgrade.  And they’re working on it.

The city library is getting a little bit of upgrading to the library’s chimney and interior library decor.   A number of windows need replacing as well as new library carpeting on the floors.

There was also a short discussion about the Central Coast’s overdue Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake which fires off every 200 to 300 years or so.  Since the Cascadia Zone’s last earthquake was in 1700AD, a big rumbler is already overdue.  The earthquake was estimated to be among the strongest shakers anywhere on the planet…somewhere around a 9.5 Richter that exploded in January of 1700.  Many of those living along the coast are quite aware of the impending ground displacement and are fortifying their dwellings.  But one aspect is that buildings and homes close to the ocean’s edge will be pounded the worst.

As daunting as the description reveals, city and county officials have created an array of ham radio operators who are very aware of the impending shaker.  So if the shaker makes a mess, Amateur Radio Operators can call out for help from other coastal communities as well as cities and towns inland who won’t be so profoundly pounded during the quake…when it comes.

Comments were made about the Echo Mountain Fire blitz – large number of houses destroyed – heavy expenses to rebuild which will take a while.  Federal money is helping out.

And finally, the council noted that the Oregon Coast, as many others, are heavily populated with “down-and-outers” who are broke or nearly out of money – therefore desperate to find a place to sleep – be it indoors or outdoors.  Local governments haven’t figured out yet how to handle the homeless other than chasing them out to find a less busy area to get overnight shut-eye.  Lots of community conversations about THAT.  Lately there’s been a trend for homeless folks who still drive camper-trailers to congregate in outlying areas from town when they want to get some shut-eye.  But again…it’s all part of homeless or near homeless areas that they have to call “home.”

An answer to the above is for states, counties and communities to rise up and demand federal support for those who have  financially been forced to sleep where it’s feasible – sorta.  President Biden has strongly suggested federal sources of money should create low to mid-rise apartment complexes which would reduce the number of homeless who have been forced to live on the streets our nation.

 

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