WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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Lincoln City City Council had a pretty full agenda Monday evening…

Along Hwy 101 from NE West Devils Lake Road (lower left) to NE Neotsu Drive (upper right)

Project to improve ped/bike upgrades along Hwy 101 between NE West Devils Lake Road and the NE Neotsu Drive Intersection (Post Office).  (On map:  Lower left to upper right.)

This project is to design and construct pedestrian and bicycle improvements along Hwy 101 between NE West Devils Lake Road and the NE Neotsu Drive intersection with 101. The project scope includes ADA improvements to the intersection of NE West Devils Road/NE Devils Lake Boulevard with crosswalks on all four quadrants. There will also be a 1,000 linear foot boardwalk or pedestrian/bike bridge crossing wetlands and matching back into the improvements on Hwy 101. The project is funded primarily through an ODOT grant. The City and The Confederated Tribe of Siletz Indians are contributing funds and the City is managing the project through a Local Agency Agreement between the City and ODOT. The total project cost is estimated at $3,051,500.00 with the State funds limited to $2,661,499.99.

The council decided that the project is so involved that the normal competitive construction bid procedure doesn’t fit with boiler plate competitive bidding due to the fact the project winds along wetlands and entails wooden walkways and other allowances that is testament to the difficulty of the route.  No start date for construction of the project was mentioned.

Limiting parking on Lincoln City city streets

After years of what many Lincoln City residents have called a street parking free-for-all, the City Council has taken the first step to limit parking on city streets for more than 24 hours.  City Councilors were informed that Lincoln City has many narrow city streets which becomes problematic when parking on both sides of the street leaves very little room for traffic – drivers having to back up to let an oncoming vehicle get through.

Under current city law, cars, trucks, r/v’s, motorcycles, camper trailers and other vehicles are technically supposed to be moved within 72 hours.  Otherwise their owners are using public streets as if they were long-term private parking lots. Lincoln City Police say the issue has become critical in some areas of town.  Monday night Police Chief Jerry Palmer, along with the city manager and city attorney suggested that the maximum parking time on a public street should be no more than 24 hours  – or a vehicle gets towed.  A few city councilors seemed a little hesitant to approve such a short duration for legal parking, but they voted to approve the new city ordinance anyway – except for one councilor voting no.  And with that single “no vote” the issue stalled and will have to be reconsidered at the council’s next meeting.  To be fair, there are many neighborhoods that have homes and apartments that have insufficient parking on-property.  So the street is their only option.  Even if drivers move their vehicles a little bit up or down the street, Chief Palmer says that won’t cut it.  Even if it’s parked 200 feet away.  And the tickets can be pricey.  Again, the Council will take up the matter again in early December.

Giving residents who grow their own vegetables a break on their water bills.  Didn’t happen.

City Councilors have talked a lot about giving residents who grow their own vegetables a break on their water bills.  The idea was to account for all the water that goes on the ground and therefore never ends up in the city’s sewer treatment plant – which means less water being purified and thereby lowering the cost of providing water to the town.

But after months of discussions among councilors, it became very confusing as to how much of a price-break vegetable-growing residents should get on their water bills just because they grow some of their own food from May through September.  Councilors came up with a number of water management scenarios none of which provided a “water-tight” set of criteria for water rates or methods to catch residents who falsely claim they grow their own veggies.  So the current method of charging for water within the city limits of Lincoln City stays the same.  At least for now.

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