WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 

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Lincoln City City Council: “Whither the gardens…allowing more manufactured housing…styrofoam and plastics”

Connie Hansen Gardens
Courtesy photo

The Lincoln City City Council Monday night tried to wrap their minds around the challenge of trying to charge customers for the water they put in their gardens and lawns at a lower rate than if that water was bound for the sewer plant – which it isn’t.  Until now, the city has been charging as if all water goes back to the sewer plant.  And because all outdoor watering doesn’t go back to the sewer plant, the city doesn’t have to pay to treat that water.  And for that outdoor watering customers would like a price break on their overall sewer/water rates. Again….inside their homes, the water becomes sewer water – outside their homes water doesn’t go to the sewer plant, it goes into the ground.  Residents reason that sewer water takes a U-turn at homes and businesses and goes back to the plant – but not for the water used for irrigation and outdoor garden watering. The council spent a lot of time trying to come up with a pricing schedule that would reflect a discount on customer sewer bills for those who do a lot of outside watering – and at the same time examining the overall cost of providing sewer and water at cost levels that doesn’t sink the city in red ink.  

Of course lower rates could be scheduled April through early fall.  More to come at the Council’s next meeting.

The Council gave the green light to manufactured homes being placed in traditional neighborhoods – areas that already have conventional stick-built housing.  The manufactured homes must be on permanent foundations and be made to blend in as much as possible with nearby regular homes. These homes are likely to be very different from what used to pass as mobile homes due to tremendous advancement in design and construction techniques as they’re built in factories and transported hundreds of miles to their new location.  Certain CC&R’s might also be in the mix.  But the goal is to provide very adequate housing for a fraction of the price of typical stick-built homes which more and more start out at a third of a million dollars and go up from there.  Coast to coast in this country, houses for anyone but the already wealthy, sees families squeezing in to dwellings where they almost have to eat and sleep in shifts.  The Lincoln City City Council knows full well that the squeeze is on for typical stick built homes meaning no-to-little new affordable housing for young families.  It sounds like some of this housing might start popping up in the Nelscott area.  From order to move-in, these 1,200 square foot condos can be manufactured, transported and placed on a regular foundation in a very short time.  Four to six story condo projects can be erected and families moved in in less than three months.  Here’s a picture of what they look like. Click here.

And here is an example of multi-family modular housing, built for far, far less than stick-built,, already on the ground and lived-in in Monterey County, California.  Click here.

And finally, the city council said they would consider outlawing styrofoam and plastic clam shell food carriers to keep them from being buried in landfills or floating in the waves along Oregon beaches. The statewide ban on plastic bags kicks in January 1st, 2020. More to come, obviously.

 

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