WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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How does working affect Social Security retirement benefits?

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Duane J. Silbernagel
Financial Advisor
Waddell & Reed


How does working affect Social Security retirement benefits?
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel, CFP®

If you’re thinking about working as long as possible to increase your retirement savings, you may be wondering whether you can receive Social Security retirement benefits while you’re still employed. The answer is yes. But depending on your age, earnings from work may affect the amount of your Social Security benefit.

If you’re younger than full retirement age and make more than the annual earnings limit ($17,040 in 2018), part of your benefits will be withheld, reducing the amount you receive from Social Security. If you’re under full retirement age for the entire year, $1 is deducted from your benefit for every $2 you earn above the annual limit.

In the year you reach full retirement age, $1 is deducted from your benefit for every $3 you earn above a different limit ($45,360 in 2018).

Starting with the month you reach full retirement age, your benefit won’t be reduced, no matter how much you earn.

Earnings that count toward these limits are wages from a job or net earnings from self-employment. Pensions, annuities, investment income, interest, and veterans or other government benefits do not count. Employee contributions to a pension or a retirement plan do count if the amount is included in your gross wages.

The Social Security Administration (SSA) may begin to withhold the required amount, up to your whole monthly benefit, as soon as it determines you are on track to surpass the annual limit. However, even if your benefits are reduced, you’ll receive a higher monthly benefit at full retirement age, because the SSA will recalculate your benefit and give you credit for any earnings withheld earlier. So the effect that working has on your benefits is only temporary, and your earnings may actually increase your benefit later.

These are just the basics, and other rules may apply. The Retirement Earnings Test Calculator, available at the Social Security website, ssa.gov, can help you estimate how earnings before full retirement age might affect your benefit.

Will a government pension reduce my Social Security benefits?

If you earned a government pension from a job not subject to Social Security tax withholding (“noncovered employment”) and are also eligible for Social Security benefits through a job where Social Security taxes were withheld, two provisions might reduce your benefits: the windfall elimination provision (WEP) and the government pension offset (GPO).

The WEP affects how a worker’s Social Security benefit is calculated. If you’re subject
to the WEP, your benefit is calculated using a modified formula, possibly resulting in a benefit reduction. The amount of the reduction depends on the year you turn 62 and the number of years in which you had substantial earnings and paid into Social Security (no reduction applies to those with 30 years or more of substantial earnings). The reduction cannot be more than one-half of your pension from noncovered employment. Spousal and dependent benefits may also be reduced, but not survivor benefits.

The GPO may affect spousal or survivor benefits if the spouse or survivor earned a government pension from noncovered employment. In this case, the GPO may reduce Social Security benefits by up to two-thirds of the amount of the pension.

For example, if you receive a $900 monthly government pension and are eligible for a $1,000 monthly Social Security spousal benefit, you would receive only $400 per month from Social Security [$1,000 minus $600 (2/3 times $900) equals $400]. You would still receive your $900 pension, so your combined benefit would be $1,300.

Not all government employees are subject to these provisions. For example, federal employees under the Federal Employees Retirement System are exempt because they pay Social Security taxes on earnings. However, public-sector employees in some states do not pay Social Security taxes, and thus could be subject to the WEP. The GPO affects pensions from noncovered federal, state, or local government employment. Rules and calculations for the WEP and the GPO are complex. Visit the Social Security website, ssa.gov, for more information.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website:
www.duane.wrfa.com
Thank you for your interest.

Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com. 
This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. The article was written by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. (Copyright 2017) and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (03/18)

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