WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 

 

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Weather or Not: Summer Storm

Thursday, June 15th – Lincoln County

Summary: Mostly cloudy yesterday, overcast with rain showers overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 63F/50F/20mph/0.05”
Depoe Bay: 61F/46F/18mph/0.06”
Newport: 59F/46F/15mph/0.09”
Waldport: 62F/47F/21mph/0.05”
Yachats: 59F/50F/20mph/0.04”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: broken @ 2,000’ & 2,500’, overcast @ 3,500’
Visibility: 10 miles/Wind: S 7 mph/Altimeter: 29.97”

A Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for unusually strong winds and heavy rain expected over Southwest Washington and Northwest Oregon, including the Central Coast, today. An unseasonably strong frontal system by June standards is approaching the Pacific Northwest coast, and will move onshore this afternoon. This system is expected to produce locally heavy rain and unseasonably strong winds across the area today. A secondary system will quickly follow, possibly bringing another round of locally heavy rain Friday. South winds are expected to increase ahead of the front later this morning into this afternoon. Gusts along the coast and in the higher terrain may reach as high as 50 mph, with the strongest winds along beaches, headlands, and exposed ridgetops.

This storm will also bring significant rainfall to the region today through Friday, with up to an inch of rain expected in the inland valleys, 1-2 inches of rain along the coast, and 2-4 inches of rain in the higher terrain. Most rivers are running low, which should alleviate most flooding concerns. However, urban areas and small streams that are typically more prone to flooding may see minor issues. Ponding on roadways may result in dangerous hydroplaning.

While snow levels are expected to be well above the Cascade passes, snow is still possible on the highest Cascade peaks. Given the expected wind and precipitation, mountain climbing and other such outdoor activities are not recommended in the Cascades today. Conditions should gradually ease Friday.

Forecast: While Summer doesn’t actually begin until the Solstice next Tuesday evening, June traditionally kicks off the season. Mother Nature, however, is producing one more blast of Winter-like conditions today before she lets go. Windy and rainy conditions will be ramping-up as the day progresses, peaking sometime this afternoon with southerly wind gusts as high as 50-55 mph and the heaviest rainfall, up to an inch or better. The mercury should reach about 60F. Rain continues tonight and tomorrow, southerlies still gusting 20-30 mph, another inch or more of rain, a low of 55F and a high around 60F. Outlook is for mostly cloudy on Saturday followed by an extended period of dry and clear weather Sunday through Wednesday. Seasonal temps are projected as highs reach 65F and lows slump to 50F all week.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are wet, temp 50F. Willamette Valley roads are mixed wet/dry, thermometer readings 50-55F. The Columbia River Gorge has mixed wet/dry pavement, temperatures 50-55F. For the Cascades, highways are wet, 40-45F, the snow level is above 8,000 feet. * An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are light SE nearshore but blowing S 20-25 knots at Stonewall Bank this morning with choppy seas 6 feet at 5 seconds. A Gale Warning is in effect through this afternoon. An unusually strong frontal storm system for so late in the season will bring wind gusts of 35-40 knots to local waters today. As a result, seas appear likely to climb into the 10-13 foot range. Even though winds will subside below gale force criteria late this afternoon and evening, seas will likely remain steep and hazardous into Friday morning. High pressure will return to the Northeast Pacific late Friday and Saturday and more or less continue a Summer-like northerly wind pattern into the middle part of next week. As a result, expect the strongest winds during the afternoon and evening hours, particularly over Central Coast waters during this time frame. With that said, we may not need any small craft advisories for the northerly winds until the latter half of next week, but considerable uncertainty with regard to that level of detail of remains. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

Notices to Mariners… Yaquina Bay Channel Lighted Buoy 9 Daymark is currently showing improper characteristics. Also, the m/v Yaquina will be dredging Yaquina Bay entrance and harbor from June 17th to June 21st; the dredge monitors VHF Channels 13 & 16.

On the Beach… Rain and very windy, surf 6-10’ feet (moderate).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
06/15 Thu 10:56 AM -0.1 L
06/15 Thu 5:54 PM 6.8 H
06/15 Thu 11:28 PM 3.1 L
06/16 Fri 5:07 AM 6.4 H

In Short: Rainy and windy, showers, then clearing and warming.

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