WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY


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Playing Catch-Up with your 401(k) or IRA

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Duane J. Silbernagel
Financial Advisor
Waddell & Reed

Playing Catch-Up with Your 401(k) or IRA
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel

A recent survey of baby boomers (ages 53 to 69) found that just 24% were confident they would have enough money to last throughout retirement. Forty-five percent had no retirement savings at all, and of those who did have savings, 42% had saved less than $100,000.

Your own savings may be on more solid ground, but regardless of your current balance, it’s smart to keep it growing. If you’re 50 or older, you could benefit by making catch-up contributions to tax-advantaged retirement accounts. You might be surprised by how much your nest egg could grow late in your working career.

Contribution limits

The federal contribution limit in 2016 and 2017 for all IRAs combined is $5,500, plus a $1,000 catch-up contribution for those 50 and older, for a total of $6,500. An extra $1,000 might not seem like much, but it could make a big difference by the time you’re ready to retire (see table). You have until the April 18, 2017, tax filing deadline to make IRA contributions for 2016. The sooner you contribute, the more time the funds will have to pursue potential growth.

The deferral limit in 2016 and 2017 for employer-sponsored retirement plans such as
401(k), 403(b), and most 457(b) plans is $18,000, plus a $6,000 catch-up contribution for workers 50 and older, for a total of $24,000. However, some employer-sponsored plans may have maximums that are lower than the federal contribution limit. Unlike the case with IRAs, contributions to employer-sponsored plans must be made by the end of the calendar year, so be sure to adjust your contributions early enough in the year to take full advantage of the catch-up opportunity.

The following table shows the amount that a 50-year-old might accrue by age 65 or 70, based on making maximum annual contributions (at current rates) to an IRA or a 401(k) plan:

Example assumes a 6% average annual return. This hypothetical example of mathematical compounding is used for illustrative purposes only and does not represent any specific investment. It assumes contributions are made at end of the calendar year. Rates of return vary over time, particularly for long-term investments. Fees and expenses are not considered and would reduce the performance shown if they were included. Actual results will vary.

Special 403(b) and 457(b) plan rules
403(b) and 457(b) plans can (but aren’t required to) provide their own special catch-up opportunities. The 403(b) special rule, available to participants with at least 15 years of service, may permit an additional $3,000 annual deferral for up to five years (certain additional limits apply). A participant can use this special rule and the age 50 catch-up rule in the same year. Therefore, a participant eligible for both could contribute up to $27,000 to his or her 403(b) plan account (the $18,000 regular deferral limit, plus the $3,000 special catch-up, plus the $6,000 age 50 catch-up).

The 457(b) plan special rule allows participants who have not deferred the maximum amount in prior years to contribute up to twice the normal deferral limit (that is, up to $36,000 in 2016 and 2017) in the three years prior to reaching the plan’s normal retirement age. (However, these additional catch-up contributions can’t exceed the total of the prior years’ unused deferrals.) 457(b) participants who elect to use this special catch-up rule cannot also use the age 50 catch-up rule in the same year.

1 “Boomer Expectations for Retirement 2016,” Insured Retirement Institute.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website:
www.duane.wrfa.com
Thank you for your interest.

This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. Waddell & Reed does not provide legal or tax advice. This information is prepared by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell & Reed believes the information has been obtained from sources considered to be reliable, but does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided. This information is not meant to be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making financial or investment decisions and does not constitute a recommendation. Please consult with a tax professional regarding your personal situation prior to making any financial related decisions. Also note that the information provided may include references to concepts that have legal, accounting and tax implications. It is not to be construed as legal, accounting or tax advice, and is provided as general information to you to assist in understanding the issues discussed. Neither Waddell & Reed, Inc., nor its Financial Advisors give tax, legal, or accounting advice. Nothing contained herein is intended as a solicitation or an offer to buy or sell any product or service mentioned and they may not be suitable for all investors.
Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com. 
Copyright 2016 – Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc.
Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (10/16)

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