WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY


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Some tips on savings bonds….

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Duane J. Silbernagel Financial Advisor Waddell & Reed

Duane J. Silbernagel
Financial Advisor
Waddell & Reed

I have matured U.S. savings bonds. Are they still earning interest and, if not, can I roll them over to another savings bond? Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel
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Once U.S savings bonds have reached maturity, they stop earning interest. Prior to 2004, you could convert your Series E or EE savings bonds for Series HH bonds. This would have allowed you to continue earning tax-deferred interest. However, after August 31, 2004, the government discontinued the exchange of any form of savings bonds for HH bonds, so that option is no longer available.

Since matured savings bonds no longer earn interest, there is no financial benefit to holding on to them. If you have paper bonds, you can cash them in at most financial institutions, suchas banks or credit unions. However, it’s a good idea to call a specific institution before going there to be sure it will redeem your bonds. As an alternative, you can mail them to theTreasury Retail Securities Site, PO Box 214, Minneapolis, MN , where they will be redeemed. If you have electronic bonds, log on to treasurydirect.gov and follow the directions there. The proceeds from your redeemed can be deposited directly into your checking or savings account for a relatively quick turnover.

Another important reason to redeem your matured savings bonds may be because savings bond interest earnings, which can be deferred, are subject to federal income tax when the bond matures or is otherwise redeemed, whichever occurs first. So if you haven’t previously reported savings bond interest earnings, you must do so when the bond matures, even if you don’t redeem the bonds.

Using the money for higher education may keep you from paying federal income tax on
your savings bond interest. The savings bond education tax exclusion permits qualified taxpayers to exclude from their gross income all or part of the interest paid upon the redemption of eligible Series EE and I bonds issued after 1989 when the bond owner pays qualified higher-education expenses at an eligible institution. However, there are very specific requirements that must be met in order to qualify, so consult with your tax professional.

How many types of government savings bonds are there, and what’s the difference between them?

While the U.S. government has issued 13 types of savings bonds, there are currently only two series available for purchase through the U.S. Treasury Department: Series EE bonds and Series I bonds. U.S. savings bonds are nonmarketable securities, which means you can’t resell them unless you’re authorized as an issuing or redeeming agent by the U.S. Treasury Department. Savings bonds are guaranteed by the federal government as to the timely payment of principal and interest.

You can buy Series EE bonds and I bonds in any amount from $25 up to $10,000, which is the maximum amount you can purchase for each bond type per calendar year. In other words, you may buy a total of $10,000 annually in both EE and I bonds, for an annual total of $20,000 for the two types combined.

Series EE bonds earn a fixed rate of interest as long as you hold them, up to 30 years. You’ll know the interest rate the bond will earn when you buy it. The U.S. Treasury announces the rate each May 1 (for new EE bonds issued between May 1 and October 31) and November 1 (for new EE bonds issued between November 1 and April 30).

Series I bonds are similar to EE bonds, but I bonds offer some protection against inflation by paying interest based on a combination of a fixed rate and a rate tied to the semi-annual inflation rate. The fixed rate component doesn’t change, whereas the rate tied to inflation is recalculated and can change every six months. The total interest (fixed and inflation adjusted) compounds semi-annually.

In any case, the interest on EE or I savings bonds isn’t paid to you until you cash in the bonds. You can cash in EE bonds or I bonds any time after one year, but if you cash them out before five years, you lose the last three months of interest.

The interest earned on both EE and I bonds is generally exempt from state income tax but subject to federal income tax. Interest income may be excluded from federal income tax when bonds are used to finance higher-education expenses, although restrictions may apply.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website:

www.duane.wrfa.com

Thank you for your interest.

This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. Waddell & Reed does not provide legal or tax advice. This information is prepared by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell & Reed believes the information has been obtained from sources considered to be reliable, but does not guarantee the accuracy of the information provided. This information is not meant to be a complete summary or statement of all available data necessary for making financial or investment decisions and does not constitute a recommendation. Please consult with a tax professional regarding your personal situation prior to making any financial related decisions. Also note that the information provided may include references to concepts that have legal, accounting and tax implications. It is not to be construed as legal, accounting or tax advice, and is provided as general information to you to assist in understanding the issues discussed. Neither Waddell & Reed, Inc., nor its Financial Advisors give tax, legal, or accounting advice. Nothing contained herein is intended as a solicitation or an offer to buy or sell any product or service mentioned and they may not be suitable for all investors.
Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com. 
Copyright 2016 – Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc.
Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (07/16)

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