WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 

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Weather or Not: Anniversary of The Big Blow

Chris Burns Weather

Monday, October 12th – Lincoln County

Summary: The weekend wrapped up yesterday with a stark change from Saturday’s storm as skies cleared, winds were light and thermometer readings rose in the mid-60s. While we were pretty much back to normal following a brush with the remnants of Hurricane Oho, a similar weather situation generated substantially different results 53 years ago today. Longtime residents will never forget the Columbus Day Storm of 1962 when what was left of Hurricane Freda plowed into the Northwest leaving death and area-wide destruction in its wake (see Weather Factoid below).

Past 24 Hours High/Low…
Lincoln City: 64F/52F
Depoe Bay: 66F/50F
Newport: 64F/45F
Waldport: 62F/49F
Yachats: 66F/49F

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Forecast: There’s a Dense Fog Advisory in effect until 11:00am, but so far the fog has only been patchy. WON PARTLY CLOUDYMostly sunny today, light south winds and highs of 60-65F. Patchy fog again tonight with some marine clouds overhead and a low about 50F. Tomorrow, sunshine after morning fog, light north winds and temps about 65F. Outlook is for sunny and warmer Wednesday and Thursday as the mercury climbs to 65-70F, partly cloudy and cooler Friday, and then another weather system comes in over the weekend with rain likely and possibly windy.

Surface Rescue

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Travel: In the Coast Range, dense fog possible early, mostly sunny later with 65-75F. Valley destinations have a Dense Fog Advisory in place through 11:00am, then sunshine and highs of 70-75F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for sunny skies, light southwest winds, temps near 70F. For the Cascades, there is dry pavement on the highways this morning, patchy fog, temperatures are 40-45F; mostly sunny today, the free air freezing level is 13,000 feet.

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Marine: Winds are light, S 10 knots, this morning with seas 7 feet at 12 seconds. A Small Craft Advisory WON SCAfor hazardous seas is in effect from this afternoon through this evening. The swell is expected to build to 9 feet at 13 seconds today and the breeze southerly 5-10 knots gusting 15. Tonight and tomorrow, winds veer to northerly 5-10 knots with seas holding at 9 feet. Outlook is for N winds 15-20 knots gusting 25 on Wednesday, and then a reversal to southerly 5-15 knots Thursday and Friday, seas slowly falling to 4-5 feet. Another weather system is looking likely for the weekend. Always check the latest Bar Reports before you venture offshore.

On the Beach… Mostly sunny, surf 6-8 feet (moderate).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
10/12 Mon 12:41 PM 8.07 H
10/12 Mon 06:56 PM 0.39 L
10/13 Tue 01:15 AM 7.42 H
10/13 Tue 06:58 AM 1.66 L

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In Short: Partly cloudy, night/morning fog, light wind, then mainly clear and warm.

Sunday Olympian Photo

Sunday Olympian Photo

Weather Factoid: What was the Columbus Day Storm? On Friday evening, October 12th, 1962, the remnants of Hurricane Freda slammed into the Pacific Northwest packing extremely powerful winds. Gusts of 150-170 mph were reported along the Oregon Coast. Newport officially recorded 138 mph before the wind gauge was destroyed; inland in downtown Portland on the Morrison Bridge, the peak was 116 mph. By the time the storm ended the next morning, 50,000 dwellings were severely damaged; 11,000,000 board feet of timber was blown down (15 times the amount annihilated by the 1980 Mount St. Helens eruption), not to mention the innumerable fallen trees in every Western Oregon neighborhood; TV and radio towers toppled; the power grid was virtually wiped out and many areas were without electricity for several weeks. The storm killed 38 people, the most from any single weather event in Oregon history. The hellacious sustained winds over 100 mph placed the Columbus Day Storm in league with a Category 3 hurricane, though it was officially termed an ‘extra-tropical cyclone.’

 

 

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