WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 

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ALL CAMPFIRES BANNED!!

From Lincoln City to Yachats, a complete fire ban is in effect.

From Lincoln City to Yachats, a complete fire ban is in effect.

Recreational Burning Closed Immediately

From Newport Fire Rescue –

Fire departments and state agencies have extended the current burn ban to recreational fires effective 10:00 am today. They are joining Oregon State Parks and Lincoln County Parks in prohibiting all open burning, including campfires in rings. The State Parks burn ban includes all Oregon beaches.

Fire danger is at an extreme high, even in our normally-damp coastal areas. To compound the danger, most local fire agencies currently have resources deployed to assist with fighting the many wildland fires active in eastern Oregon. Lincoln County has sent out two task force groups in the past several weeks, and will probably be activated again in the coming days. The unusually high fire danger coupled with the reduced available firefighting resources make a complete ban on burning the right thing to do.

A note from North Lincoln Fire and Rescue –

People think the coast is immune from “wildfire” but the worst Oregon fire, the “Great Forest Fire of 1845,” occurred in northern Lincoln County and southern Tillamook county burning an estimated 1.5 million acres. A few years later in 1851 the “Yaquina Fire” burned 450,000 acres, and many people living down south in Bandon know of the fire that destroyed that coastal town in 1936. If that seems like ancient history, many people alive today recall the “Tillamook Burn” which was a series of fires from 1933 to 1951 that destroyed 355,000 acres. 

Oregon has just had two of the worst fire seasons in history.  In 2014 more than 1.26 million acres burned between Oregon and Washington.  Oregon witnessed 58 large fires, the largest of which was the Buzzard Complex in eastern Oregon burning nearly 400,000 acres; and remember the rare coastal fires in January of last year that burned 120 acres near Arch Cape.

So the question is, have you given any serious consideration to what you will do when disaster strikes?  Have you prepared your home and surroundings to have defensible space?  How will you, your family and community survive a severe event?
 
If you want to learn more on disaster preparedness, look into the free training offered at the Oregon Coast Community College’s “Disaster Preparedness for the Pacific Northwest” class  or the S.E.T. “Severe Event Training” offered by North Lincoln Fire & Rescue or visit these web-sites www.oregontsunami.org, www.lincolncountysheriff.net/emergency/ and www.ready.gov/make-a-plan; www.red-cross.org the time to prepare is now.

Play Safe at the Coast,
Captain Jim Kusz

 

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