WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

 

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A Yachats River Love Story –

Father and new Mother Goose at Nancy Kromer's place on the South Fork of the Yachats River

Father and new Mother Goose at Karen Alder’s place on the South Fork of the Yachats River

– A Fable of the Yachats Forest

South County photographer Ken Gagne happened to stop by Karen Alder’s place on the south fork of the Yachats River the other day. He noticed that Alder’s “Father Goose” looked a little lack-luster – like he was lonesome; needed some company.

So he asked Karen why Father Goose looked so sad.

Karen replied that he had lost his lady fair several years earlier and has been a lonely goose ever since – spending his days just sadly paddling about the pond.

Suddenly Ken remembered about a flock of geese up the north fork of the Yachats at Shooting Star Farm. Ken jumped onto his gallant white horse, yelled “I’ll be back,” and rode hell-bent-for-goose-feathers upriver.

Upon arrival, Ken quickly dismounted and told his friends George and Isabelle about the lonely goose he had seen. He asked them whether they would allow him purchase a fine lady goose that might like some fresh surroundings? “Of course, we’d be happy to that,” said Isabelle.

They placed the lady goose in a travel box and placed it atop Ken’s white stead and soon he and the lady goose were disappearing in a cloud of dust around a bend in the river, headed for the south fork.

A short time later Karen greeted Ken at her pond and eyed the box he was carrying. “Whatcha got in there Ken?” she asked. “Hopefully a happier life for Father and,” (pulling out his feathery present), “Mother Goose!” he proclaimed!

By then Father Goose had edged closer to the bank, watching the “special delivery” unfold. As Ken lowered the new addition into the water, Lady Goose spread her wings and flew to the center of the pond – then silently sat there – getting her bearings. Father Goose gingerly paddled over to her. Both sat silently in the calm water, just looking at each other. Ken said he could have sworn he saw both of them crack a smile.

And off they paddled to the far edge of the pond, under the shade trees, to a little secluded spot where they could get acquainted.

Ken tipped his hat at Karen and said, “Looks like love’s got a pretty good chance of making’em both happy!” “I hope you’re right, Ken,” she said.

And with that Ken swung atop his stead and galloped away down the trail to his castle on the hill overlooking Yachats Bay.

Karen’s husband came out from the farmhouse with a puzzled look on his face and asked, “Who was that guy? I didn’t get a good look at him.”

Karen just smiled and said, “I think they call him ‘The Lone Arranger.'”

Six weeks later the Alder farm was all a-twitter with the happy little chirps of baby goslings splashing about in the pond, trying out their brand new water-wings under the bright blue skies, and the watchful eyes of Father and Mother Goose.

 

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