WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY


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Weather or Not: Round 2

Chris Burns Weather

Friday, Feb. 6th – Lincoln County

Summary: While conditions settled somewhat by midday yesterday on the heels of a rip-roaring Round 1, Round 2 in the current bout of intense weather systems rolled through last night while you slept, or at least tried to. High winds returned, gusting 50 mph along the Central Coast. Regionally, the highest gusts overnight were 81 mph at Cape Meares and on Mary’s Peak in the Coast Range, and 79 mph at the Coast Guard’s Cape Blanco station. Locally, 24-hour rainfall totals were above 2”. Temperatures stayed quite warm for February with highs around 60F; a record high temperature of 64F was set at the Eugene airport, breaking the old record of 62F set in 2010. At daybreak, it was still breezy with moderate to heavy rainfall. The good news? We reached 10 hours of daylight today as the days continue growing longer.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain/Storm Total Rain…
Lincoln City: 59F/56F/45mph/1.97”/2.19”
Depoe Bay: 58F/53F/38mph/2.37”/2.55”
Newport: 61F/54F/47mph/2.21”/2.32”
Waldport: 61F/53F/44mph/2.24”/2.37”
Yachats: 62F/56F/51mph/2.65”/2.81”

WARNING NWS SWSAdvisories/Warnings: The latest High Wind Warning issued by the National Weather Service for beaches and headlands along the Central Coast ends at 9:00am this morning. South winds 25-35 mph with gusts to 60 mph. In coastal communities, south wind 15-30 mph with gusts to 45.

The Special Weather Statement for moderate to heavy rain and gusty winds at times continues through Monday. The current storm systems have a connection to subtropical moisture and will be quite wet, but breaks between the individual systems may be enough to keep most area rivers within their banks. The current wave of rain will decrease later today and the coastal high winds will subside this morning. Another low is forecast to approach the coast on Saturday. There is greater uncertainty on the strength and timing of this system but it may bring high winds to the coast again, and depending on the eventual track of this system, some of the south winds may extend into the inland valleys as well. The last in the series of systems is expected to approach on Sunday and continue over the area through Monday. This may possibly be the strongest of the series and could bring strong winds to both the coast and the inland valleys. Rainfall totals for the period through Monday could reach 5-7 inches along the coast, in the coastal mountains and in the Cascades, with 2-3 inches or a bit more in the valleys. Rainfall amounts for the past 24 hours ending early Friday morning have already reached 3-4 inches in the far north Oregon Coast Range.

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Forecast: Round 2 is still unfolding today. The winds are subsiding but rain will be heavier at least through the early part of the day with up to another inch. Rain continues tonight, maybe a half inch or so, and winds should be around 20-25 mph WON WINDY RAINYgusting 35. We then turn our attention to Round 3 tomorrow when high winds of 30-40 mph gusting 55 are possible along with additional heavy rain at times. Outlook is for a short lull during the day on Sunday before Round 4 comes barreling in Sunday night and Monday packing more strong winds and heavy rain. This final blast could be the most powerful of the bunch, but the jury’s still out on just how potent it’ll be. Then, finally, it looks like Tuesday and Wednesday we’re in for drying, some sunshine and light winds. Another weather system may impact the Central Coast late in the week. Temperatures are expected to remain well above normal between 45F and 60F.

Travel: In the Coast Range today, rain, possibly heavy, windy with highs 50-55F. Valley destinations are expecting rain, moderate winds and a high of 55-60F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for rain, possibly heavy at times, east winds gusting 25 mph, temps 50-55F. For the Cascades, there is wet pavement on the highway passes this morning, temperatures are in the 40s; rainy and breezy, the snow level is at 7,000 feet. Outlook for weekend travelers is rainy and windy with wet pavement through Sunday night; the Cascade highway passes should remain clear of snow and ice as the snow level is expected to remain between 5,000 and 7,500 feet.

Surface Rescue

Call or email George today!

Cascades Snow Pack: Currently 31”, a loss of 2” since yesterday; an overall loss of 1” in the past seven days; 37” less than this date last year; 88% below the 30-year average Snow Water Equivalent (total amount of moisture in the snow pack).

Ski Report – New Snow/Base/Condition…
Hoodoo 0”/0”/closed
Willamette Pass 0”/3”/closed
Mt. Bachelor 0”/42”/wet packed
Mt. Hood Ski Bowl 0”/1”/tubing only
Mt. Hood Meadows 0”/28”/wet packed
Timberline 0”/28”/wet packed

Marine: Southerly winds have fallen nearshore this morning to 15-20 knots, but offshore they’re still howling at 30-WON GALE40 knots with very rough seas 17-18 feet at 13 seconds. As of 8:00am, Depoe Bay and Yaquina Bay bars are closed to all recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. A Gale Warning remains in effect through this evening for S winds 30-35 knots gusting 40-45 along with combined steep seas 18-22 feet at 12 seconds. The breeze eases a little tonight to S 20-35 knots and seas fall slightly to 16-19 feet at 11 seconds. Tomorrow, the next storm system comes into local waters with southerlies rising again to 30-40 knots gusting 45 and rough seas back up to 18-22 feet. Outlook is for a bit of a lull on Sunday as the breeze goes SE 20-25 knots and seas subside to 14 feet. Monday, however, the last in the current series of weather system brings S winds of 25-35 knots and rough combined seas rebuilding to 18-20 feet. High pressure and calmer weather is predicted for Tuesday; NW winds 15-20 knots and the swell down to 10 feet.

Notice to Mariners… Update Light List with Depoe Bay regulated navigation area warning sign in position 44-48-36.096N, 124-03-42.072W, worded ROUGH BAR with characteristic QY. Lights flash when bar is restricted to recreational and uninspected passenger vessels. The sign is visible from 017° to 263°.

Call Craig today at 541-270-4565

Call Craig today at 541-270-4565

On the Beach… Rainy and windy, surf 18-20 feet (high).
* Stay off of jetties and offshore rocks, and be extremely watchful on rocky shores or sandy beaches. These areas may be periodically inundated by surf, especially during this afternoon’s high tide. Be aware of sneaker waves that will be significantly higher than those that precede or follow them. Never turn your back on the ocean.
* Tides
02/06 Fri 07:28 AM 2.58 L
02/06 Fri 01:20 PM 8.08 H
02/06 Fri 07:46 PM 0.59 L
02/07 Sat 02:19 AM 7.94 H

In Short: Stormy, then stormy.

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