WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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NW Harbor green light, it’s “no” for Rocky Creek, The Knoll officially open space and a gift to Coast Vineyard Church

NW Harbor project finally moving... Courtesy photo

NW Harbor project finally moving…
Courtesy photo

SW Harbor streetscape project ready to crank up and be done by late Spring.

The Lincoln City City Council Monday night got a fast update on progress to upgrade NW Harbor from 14th to 18th – a project long in the planning. The project is aimed at providing a more attractive streetscape, better pedestrian, bicycle and ADA access to the beach, and preserve as much on-street parking as possible. It will also better protect views of the beach as well as preserve existing driveways to homes and businesses.

The project will put in 37-hundred square feet of new ADA sidewalks, 885 lineal feet of new curb and gutter, five new stormwater catch basins, 1,000 lineal feet of new continuous sidewalk on the west side of Harbor and a complete asphalt overlay of the street.

City staff said the project is fully designed and that construction will begin on the neighborhood facelift so that it’ll all be done and ready to be dedicated before the tourist season hits in June. Once completed, staff said the second portion of the project, roughly 18th to 21st, will be launched just as soon as there is money to get it done. Nobody offered a guess as to when that might be but everyone seemed to think it’ll be in the near, rather than far future.

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Joost Neillssen photo Wikipedia Commons

Joost Neillssen photo
Wikipedia Commons

City Council says “Not right now” to possible joint water project with Newport.

Although the need for additional water supplies for Lincoln City may be two or three decades down the road, Lincoln City City Councilors voted against teaming up with Newport to jointly explore using Rocky Creek water on Foulweather for those additional supplies. The councilors took some direction from City Manager David Hawker that although the need for more water is not acute, it will be some day. But in the meantime, partnering with Newport doesn’t make much logistical or financial sense. Hawker told the council through a memo that although Rocky Creek, which is a primary water source for Depoe Bay, may appear today to be the lowest cost source for future water, that’s only on paper. Hawker said there are a number of other options the council and future councils will be able to analyze down the road. More water tanks, among them. Hawker noted that Lincoln City currently has a 20 year supply of water. So they’ve got time to study the issue further. Hawker said there are a lot of technological breakthroughs we might see in the next ten to twenty years that may change the city’s overall water picture.

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View looking south from "The Knoll"

View looking south from “The Knoll”

Council makes it official: “The Knoll” is now officially “open space.”

The city council passed a new ordinance Monday night that will preserve The Knoll, overlooking the city, as a spectacular open space vista. Rising from just east of Roads End, the council, recently purchased “The Knoll” and hundreds of other acres around it, from a developer who got caught in the middle of the worst recession in decades. Although the council unanimously agreed to designate The Knoll as open space, free of any future development, there was some consternation over the fact that a piece of property just downhill from The Knoll might wind up having homes built on it if such construction on steep slopes might eventually pencil out. Mayor Dick Anderson said that development on such steep terrain is not likely to happen due to high costs for sewer, water and expensive engineering to make sure the homes stay put. But he added that he would like to hold open the possibility that high-end homes might some day be built up there. Those opposed to the prospect of homes so close to such scenic open space said they’re confident there will be no immediate threat of development on the property.

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A gift of public property to those who give the gift of food to Lincoln City’s down-and-out families.

Coast Vineyard Church, at 1505 NE 6th, has engineered a deal with the city council that will let them expand their community food pantry for the needy. The city is swapping them city-owned land next door for land the church needs to expand their pantry. The city land is worth quite a bit more than what the church land is worth but the difference won’t have to be paid by the church if it keeps running its pantry for the needy for the foreseeable future.

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New City Manager formally hired

The Lincoln City City Council also Monday night made it official – they hired a new city manager to take the place of the retiring David Hawker. Ron Chandler, immediate past city manager of North Ogden, UT, is expected to arrive in the area with his wife shortly after the first of the year. From media reports on Chandler’s departure from his North Ogden job, everyone seemed to heap a great deal of praise on Mr. Chandler for his professional work ethic.

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