WEATHER IN LINCOLN COUNTY

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Great Oregon Shake Out

Cascadia Subduction Zone,  likely to rupture SW of Coos Bay

Cascadia Subduction Zone,
likely to rupture next SW of Coos Bay

LINCOLN COUNTY CITIZENS AND BUSINESS ENCOURAGED TO PARTICIPATE IN THE GREAT OREGON SHAKEOUT, Friday, October 16th at 10:16 A.M.

Lincoln County Emergency Management is urging citizens and businesses to register and participate in the 2014 Great Oregon Shakeout. While the potential earthquake hazards depend upon your location, you could be anywhere when an earthquake strikes- at home, at work, at school or even on vacation. What we do now will determine our quality of life after our next big earthquake. Are you prepared to survive and recover quickly?

The Great Oregon ShakeOut is an annual opportunity to practice how to be safer during big earthquakes: “Drop, Cover and Hold On.” The ShakeOut has also been organized to encourage you, your community, your school, or your organization to review and update emergency preparedness plans and supplies, and to secure your space in order to prevent damage and injuries.

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Registration totals from Great ShakeOut Earthquake Drills across the U.S. are also included in America’s PrepareAthon! participation totals. The Great Oregon ShakeOut website has several tools and information sheets for your type of community group, family or business that you can use to create a drill or take preparedness steps.

To register or learn more go to www.shakeout.org/oregon

The Public Safety Agencies of Lincoln County will be sponsoring an emergency readiness fair ~ Prepare Together in 2014 ~ on Saturday, October 25th, 11am – 2pm. Lincoln County Emergency Manager will host the presentation “What you may not know about Cascadia Subduction Zone Earthquake and your need to prepare” from 11:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.

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If you are new to our coastal communities or unfamiliar with our earthquake hazards then you need to know that Oregon lies at a convergent continental boundary where two tectonic plates are colliding. The Cascadia Subduction Zone is actually a 600 mile long earthquake fault stretching from offshore northern California to southern British Columbia. This fault builds up stress for hundreds of years as the Juan de Fuca and North America Plates push against each other. Eventually, the two plates rip apart, creating some of the largest earthquakes and tsunamis on earth. Where the Juan de Fuca oceanic plate and the North American continental plate meet is called a subduction zone, because the denser Juan de Fuca Plate is being pulled under North America. The Juan de Fuca Plate is moving to the northeast at about an inch a year as the North American Plate moves west. The Oregon coastline is actually bulging upward from the two plates pushing against each other.

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There are over 1000 earthquakes over magnitude 1.0 in Washington and Oregon every year, with at least two dozen being large enough to be felt. Approximately 17 people have lost their lives due to earthquakes in the Pacific Northwest. Since 1872, there have been 20 damaging earthquakes in Washington and Oregon. The Pacific coast poses special risk from tsunamis associated with a Cascadia Subduction Zone earthquake. In addition to Subduction zone earthquakes, Oregon is also susceptible to crustal earthquakes. The two largest earthquakes in recent years in Oregon, Scotts Mills, (magnitude 5.6) and the Klamath Falls, main shocks (magnitude 5.9 and magnitude 6.0) of 1993 were crustal earthquakes.

For additional information on planning or assessment findings by the State of Oregon please review “The Oregon Resilience Plan Reducing Risk and Improving Recovery for the Next Cascadia Earthquake and Tsunami” report to the 77th Legislative Assembly from Oregon Seismic Safety Policy Advisory Commission (OSSPAC).

http://www.oregon.gov/OMD/OEM/osspac/docs/Oregon_Resilience_Plan_Final.pdf

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