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Turning inspiration into action: Hands-on art, education and advocacy events scheduled at the Washed Ashore exhibit in Lincoln City

Lincoln City
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LINCOLN CITY – Priscilla the Parrot Fish, Flash the Blue Marlin and Gertrude the Penguin are already the talk of the town, attracting thousands of visitors on Hwy. 101 to the west lawn of the Lincoln City Cultural Center. Now, the remarkable marine debris sculptures of Washed Ashore are inviting the public to learn more and take action to stem the tide of plastics pollution, through a series of free events in February and March.   

The Cascade Head Biosphere Reserve Collaborative, SOLVE, Siletz Tribes Charitable Contribution Fund and the Driftwood Public Library have joined the community of local sponsors making the Washed Ashore experience a reality for the central coast.  

At the heart of the project are the 19 works in the touring exhibit, Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea. The nonprofit Washed Ashore project was founded in 2010 by artist Angela Haseltine Pozzi, using debris she collected from the beaches in Bandon. The sculptures have traveled all over the country, from the Shedd Aquarium and the Smithsonian Institution to the San Francisco Zoo and SeaWorld Orlando. Everywhere they go, these engaging creatures graphically illustrate the tragedy of plastic pollution in our ocean and waterways. 

 

 

 

In addition to Priscilla, Flash and Gertrude, the Cultural Center’s outdoor exhibit includes Chompers the Shark, Stanley the Sturgeon and the American Sea Star, arrayed on the Cultural Center’s west lawn. Inside the auditorium, visitors will find 9-foot-long Leo Jelly and a “bloom” of smaller jellies, Giacometti the River Otter and a variety of wall mosaics and informational panels. Among the favorite indoor displays is the wall of floats, ropes, plastic items and debris, all of which was collected by a single Lincoln City resident during a single month in 2021. 

The work is combined with scientifically based educational signage to teach children and adults about ocean stewardship, responsible consumer habits and how “every action counts” to help save the sea. The outdoor exhibit is open from dawn to dusk daily, while the indoor portion is open from 10 am to 4 pm Thursday-Monday, and by appointment. The Washed A-Store, which sells T-shirts, sweatshirts, water bottles, re-usable silverware and posters, is open along with the indoor exhibit. Proceeds from the sale of these environmentally-friendly souvenirs supports both the Cultural Center and Washed Ashore organizations.  

The exhibit is scheduled to remain in place through March 13. As part of the Washed Ashore project, the Cultural Center is coordinating the followingfree community education/action events: 

  • Washed Ashore Field Trips with Hands-on Art Experiences, by appointment Feb. 1-March 13 – Through the support of local and regional funders, LCCC staff are leading guided tours of the Washed Ashore exhibit for students in grades K-12, and beyond. Whenever possible, students will also assemble components of a marine debris sculpture that will be permanently placed on the Cultural Center grounds. To inquire about a field trip for your group, call Krista, 541-994-9994. 
  • Meet the Author: Oregon Legacy Series presents Allison Cobb, 4 pm Sunday, Feb. 13 — Allison Cobb, author of “Plastic: An Autobiography” and a writer for the Environmental Defense Fund, will speak in the auditorium. All attendees ages 12 and over must present proof of vaccination at the door. Sponsored by the Friends of the Driftwood Public Library, the D Sands Condominium Motel and the National Endowment for the Humanities. 
  • Swimming Upstream: Addressing Plastics Pollution Through Action,” 2-5 pm Saturday, Feb. 26 — Inspired by Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea? Learn how you can make a difference at this free community event. Browse the information stations, contribute to the hands-on plastics art project and hear a range of speakers, with a new presenter every half hour (on the half hour). All attendees ages 12 and over must present proof of vaccination at the door. This event is co-sponsored by SOLVE and the LCCC.
  • “What Should Be Washing Ashore,” 11am-2pm Saturday, March 5 — As Lincoln City says farewell to the popular installation of Art to Save the Sea, join us for a look at “What Should Be Washing Ashore,” with the Cascade Head Biosphere Collaborative and partners. Learn about ocean currents and biodiversity, and explore how you as a casual beachcomber with a smartphone can help climate scientists better understand the ocean environment through the WRACK LINE Project, the latest  Coastal Climate Change + Community Art, Science, and Tradition Project. Visit 4CASTProject.org to learn more. All attendees ages 12 and over must present proof of vaccination at the door. 

Admission to the exhibit and events is free, thanks to funding by the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, Oregon Coast Visitors Association, The Roundhouse Foundation, the Oneatta Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, Explore Lincoln City and North Lincoln Sanitary Service. The LCCC also received installation support from Knottworks Construction and the Inn at Spanish Head. “We’d like to thank all the generous foundations, agencies and businesses that stepped forward last summer, as well as all the people who have donated since Washed Ashore arrived,” said Niki Price, executive director of the LCCC. “They’ve started a real community effort that we hope will have lasting impact.”   

To learn more or get involved, contact LCCC’s executive director, Niki Price, at 541-994-9994 or niki@lc-cc.org. The Lincoln City Cultural Center is located at 540 NE Hwy. 101, inside the historic Delake School. 

 

Walking the beaches…waiting for what’s “normal….”

Cascade Head Biosphere Collaborative and 4CAST Project Partners Hosts What Should Be Washing Ashore at the Lincoln City Cultural Center

Lincoln City, Oregon – As we say farewell to Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea exhibit, the Cascade Head Biosphere Collaborative and their partners in the 4CAST Project are hosting a special event called What Should Be Washing Ashore, taking place on Saturday, March 5th from 11am-2pm at the Lincoln City Cultural Center.

At this free event, the 4CAST partners will be kicking off a new community science initiative called the WRACK LINE, where volunteers using a smartphone app easily identify and document what marine species are washing ashore in the UNESCO Cascade Head Biosphere Reserve throughout the year. The event will include science presentations on ocean currents, marine biology, and the increasing knowledge about how microplastics are affecting ocean life. There will also be an opportunity for the public to make their own nature print or gyotaku, and to see behind the scenes of a new permanent art piece now in development for the Lincoln City Cultural Center. Through tabletop displays and chats with scientists, artists, and naturalists, the public will get a first-hand look at other 4CAST Projects taking place at the sentinel research site that is the UNESCO Cascade Head Biosphere Reserve.

 

• 4CAST Project – Studying 4 Habitats from Tree to Sea in the UNESCO Cascade Head Biosphere Reserve

o Uplands–Pheno-CamProject
o Estuary–GreenCrabSurveillance o Nearshore–SeaStarMonitoring o Sub-Tidal/Oceanic–WRACKLINE

4CAST Project (Coastal Climate Change + Community Art, Science, and Tradition) is a dynamic collaborative made up of state and federal agencies, institutions of higher learning, and non-profits serving the environment and education. Partners include Oregon State University Marine Studies Initiative, US Forest Service, The Nature Conservancy, Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the Oregon Coast Aquarium. The 4CAST Project aims to understand how climate change is affecting our coastline and community, through a collection of different projects and efforts.

To learn more about What should be Washing Ashore and to learn more and get involved as a volunteer with the 4CAST Project, visit www.4castproject.org.

Confederated Tribes of the Siletz Indians

Confederated Tribes of Siletz Indians

Delores Pigsley, Tribal Chairman Alfred “Bud” Lane III, Vice Chairman
For more information, contact: Tribal Public Information Office, 541-444-8291

Siletz Tribe Gives Away More Than $123,000

 

The Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund has distributed $123,344.29 to 38 organizations as it continues its quarterly donations to nonprofit groups. Due to the current conditions of the coronavirus pandemic, the reception originally scheduled for Nov. 5 was canceled.

The Siletz Tribe has made contributions through employment, monetary donations and cooperative measures to the Siletz community, Lincoln County and the state of Oregon. The seven-member charitable fund advisory board has distributed more than $15.4 million since its inception in 2001.

Overall, the Tribe has honored its tradition of sharing within the community by distributing more than $19.7 million through the charitable fund and other Tribal resources. Chinook Winds has donated more than $6.5 million in cash and fund-raising items since it opened in 1995. The casino also provides in-kind donations of convention space for various fund-raisers as well as technical support, advertising and manpower for many events.

The next deadline to submit applications is Dec. 1, 2021. Eligibility for money from the charitable fund is limited to two categories:

• Entities and activities located in the Siletz Tribe’s 11-county service area (Lincoln, Tillamook, Linn, Lane, Benton, Polk, Yamhill, Marion, Multnomah, Washington and Clackamas counties)

• Native American entities and activities located anywhere in the United States

Applications and requirements can be obtained at ctsi.nsn.us/charitable-contribution-fund; by calling 800-922-1399, ext. 1227, or 541-444-8227; or by mailing Siletz Tribal Charitable Contribution Fund, P.O. Box 549, Siletz, OR 97380-0549. Applications can be submitted via e-mail at stccf@live.com.

Lincoln City Cultural Center – sponsorship of nationally known traveling exhibit Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea;  Lincoln City, OR; $5,000

Arts – $5,000

Alsea Community Effort – tools, components and manuals for hands-on training for science students at Alsea Charter School to build and use ham radios; Alsea, OR; $1,700

Education – $18,622.08

Clemens Primary School – books for students during school-wide Book Week activities; Philomath, OR; $3,160

Eddyville Charter School – spiny dogfish sharks for facilitated dissection activity to learn about body systems; Eddyville, OR; $600

Friends of the Lebanon Public Library – books for all ages for summer reading program; Lebanon, OR; $1,500

Oregon Coast Aquarium – reduced admission fee program for Lincoln County residents and school field trips; Newport, OR; $2,500

Oregon Coast Community College – replace desktop computers in computer lab; Newport, OR; $5,000

Salem-Keizer Public School, Native Education – supplies for Native graduates’ presentations and culturally based graduation ceremony; Salem, OR; $2,000

Siletz Valley Friends of the Library – liability insurance for members and volunteers; Siletz, OR; $670

Toledo Elementary School – The Inquiry Project: Investigating Earth Materials curriculum kits for fourth-grade classes; Toledo, OR; $1,492.08

Elakha Alliance – stipends for 2-4 Native youth interns, software, supplies and supervision-related costs to elevate the youth voice in sea otter restoration; Siletz, OR; $5,000

Environment & Natural Resource Preservation – $9,800

Long Tom Watershed Council – native bulbs and seed for restoration work on 12 acres of oak and prairie habitat following a prescribed burn; Eugene, OR; $4,800

ALS Association, Oregon and SW Washington Chapter – support for Medical Services Program through loaning adaptive and augmentative equipment and case management; Portland, OR; $5,000

Health – $40,270

Coastal Range Food Bank – food to assist people within the service area; Blodgett, OR; $2,000

Corvallis Environmental Center – rototiller, porta-potty rental, seeds, starts, soil and supplies to create fresh produce for food share and community gardens; Corvallis, OR; $4,500
Ecumenical Ministries of Oregon – food and support for hot meals at the day center and meal delivery service for people living with HIV/AIDS; Portland, OR; $10,000
Liberty House – art and sensory therapy books, games, toys and supplies for child services; Salem, OR; $2,250
Marion Polk Food Share – compost, soil, seed and plant starts for youth farm and community gardens; Salem, OR; $5,000
Philomath Community Gleaners – food resources; Philomath, OR; $2,000
Returning Veterans Project – veterans health providers’ continuing education, including registration, processing fees and speaker fees; Portland, OR; $1,500
Siletz Community Thanksgiving Dinner Committee – food boxes with turkeys and other supplies to cooka Thanksgiving meal to distribute to families in need; Siletz, OR; $3,170

Yamhill County Master Gardener Association – lumber, soil, containers, plant materials and hand tools to distribute raised bed and container gardens; McMinnville, OR; $4,850

Lebanon Museum Foundation – recording equipment and supplies for oral history project with local elders; Lebanon, OR; $929.25

Historical Preservation – $8,610.96

North Lincoln County Historical Museum – purchase and install signage and acrylic donation boxes; Lincoln City, OR; $1,859.71

Shipley Historical Marker Association – prepare and install historical marker near Reuben Shipley’s family farm and Mt. Union Cemetery; Corvallis, OR; $3,900

Willamette Heritage Center – supplies for rentable Backpack Buddies tailored for hands-on interactive activity for children and families; Salem, OR; $1,922

Albany American Legion Post 10 – toys and snacks for children through age 12 attending the community Christmas party; Albany, OR; $2,000

Other – $10,619.96

Central Coast Humane Society – subsidize rabies vaccinations for dogs and cats; Newport, OR; $5,000

Greater Jefferson Community Center – replace and upgrade desktop computer, monitor, printer and software to expand online visibility, improve recordkeeping and provide quality brochures; Jefferson, OR; $1,619.96

Oregon Coastal Quilters Guild – batting/filling for handmade quilts to be presented to Lincoln County veterans; South Beach, OR; $2,000

Altrusa International of Albany – personal items and activity kits for homeless youth entering Jackson Street Youth Services shelters; Albany OR; $3,000

Prevention – $7,000

Altrusa International of Yaquina Bay – Project School Bell program to provide emergency clothing, shoes, coats and hygiene products to Lincoln County schools; Newport, OR; $4,000

Adair Rural Fire and Rescue – replace/upgrade AED equipment; Adair Village, OR; $5,757.24 Blodgett-Summit Rural Fire Protection District – replace AEDs for use by fire and emergency

Public Safety – $23,421.29

Volunteers – Blodgett, OR; $3,100

Central Coast Fire and Rescue – firefighting hoses of various diameters; Waldport, OR; $2,500 Emergency Volunteer Corps of Nehalem Bay – communications, medical, shelter, water and other supplies for disaster box kits for neighborhood emergency gathering sites;

Manzanita, OR;  $3,500

Molalla Rural Fire Protection District #73 – wildland fire shelters, supplies, AED and other safety/medical equipment; Molalla, OR; $4,064.05

Yachats Rural Fire Protection District – firefighting turnouts, boots, gloves, thermal imaging camera and hose nozzles; Yachats, OR; $4,500

 

Art to Save the Sea: Arriving in Lincoln City and Grand Opening October 23rd

Art to Save the Sea: Washed Ashore creatures are headed to the Lincoln City Cultural Center, Grand Opening Oct. 23


CALENDAR ENTRIES

Oct. 16, 2021-March 13, 2022 – Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea in residence at the Lincoln City Cultural Center. A touring exhibit of large whimsical sculptures made from marine debris, highlighting the message of plastic pollution and personal responsibility. Outside display open daily from dawn to dusk. Interior exhibits (including the sea jelly bloom) open from 10 am to 4 pm Thursday-Monday and by appointment (some auditorium closures are planned during Grand Opening Weekend). Admission is free. The LCCC is located at 540 NE Hwy. 101, inside the historic Delake School. For information, call 541-994-9994 or head to lincolncity-culturalcenter.org.

Friday, Oct. 22 through Sunday, Oct. 24, 2021 – Grand Opening events for Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea at the Lincoln City Cultural Center. The full Washed Ashore exhibit will open to the public this weekend, remaining on site at the LCCC through March 2022. Founding artist Angela Haseltine Pozzi and the Washed Ashore artistic team will be on site to train docents and celebrate the installation. Schedule will be:

Friday, Oct. 22
10-4 pm Auditorium Open for Viewing (Regular Hours)
5 pm Ribbon Cutting with Lincoln City Chamber Ambassadors
5-6 pm Auditorium Exhibit Open

Saturday, Oct. 23
10 am-Noon Auditorium closed for Docent Training (free, must pre-register at 541-994-9994)
1 pm Free Screening of “Washed Ashore” Movie
2:30-4 pm Auditorium open to the public
6 pm “Get Inspired” Presentation by Angela Haseltine Pozzi, $25

Sunday, Oct. 24
10 am-1 pm Auditorium open for viewing
1 pm Free Screening of “Washed Ashore” movie, in the LCCC Auditorium
2:30-4 pm Auditorium open for viewing

To purchase tickets for the “Get Inspired” talk with the artist, to donate or to volunteer, head to lincolncityculturalcenter.org or call 541-994-9994.

LINCOLN CITY, OCT. 5, 2021 – The Lincoln City Cultural Center has confirmed that Washed Ashore, a touring exhibit of sea life sculptures made entirely of marine debris, will bring its message of ocean stewardship to the central Oregon Coast this fall. Thanks to the generosity of regional funders and foundations, a 19-piece collection of Washed Ashore: Art to Save the Sea will be on display at the Cultural Center through March 13, 2022.
The Washed Ashore project was founded in 2010 by artist Angela Haseltine Pozzi, using debris she collected from the beaches in Bandon. The sculptures have traveled all over the country, from the Shedd Aquarium and the Smithsonian Institution to the San Francisco Zoo and SeaWorld Orlando. Everywhere they go, Washed Ashore’s engaging creatures graphically illustrate the tragedy of plastic pollution in our ocean and waterways.

It’s a message with special relevance to the Lincoln City Cultural Center, on the central Oregon Coast just a few blocks from the beach along one of the busiest stretches of Highway 101. Admission at the Cultural Center exhibit will be free, thanks to generous funding by the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, Oregon Coast Visitors Association, The Roundhouse Foundation, the Oneatta Fund of the Oregon Community Foundation, the Ford Family Foundation, Explore Lincoln City and North Lincoln Sanitary Service. The LCCC is also receiving special installation assistance from Knottworks Construction of Lincoln City.

The public is invited to enjoy Priscilla the Parrot Fish (who is 16 feet long and 9 feet tall) along with Flash the Blue Marlin, Gertrude the Penguin, Chompers the Shark, Stanley the Sturgeon and the American Sea Star, arrayed on the Cultural Center’s west lawn. Inside the auditorium, visitors will find 10-foot long Leo Jelly and a “bloom” of smaller jellies, as well as the adorable tall Giacometti the River Otter.

All of the artworks are made from colorful marine debris – mostly plastic – found on the beach in Oregon. The work is combined with scientifically based educational signage to teach children and adults about ocean stewardship, responsible consumer habits and how “every action counts” to help save the sea.

Since 2010, more than 10,000 volunteers have participated in the Washed Ashore project, helping Pozzi and her team to create more than 80 sculptures using more than 38,000 pounds of marine debris. After serving as lead artist for more than a decade, Pozzi is passing this role to Washed Ashore veteran Steve Wright.

“The ultimate goal of a Washed Ashore exhibit is to use the power of the arts to spark change in consumer habits,” Haseltine Pozzi said. “As viewers are lured to look more closely by the beauty and craftsmanship of the art, all ages are shocked and motivated to learn more about the issue of plastic pollution. The viewers themselves are then gently guided with signage to take personal action in a way they can embrace. We teach that, truly, every action counts to save the sea.”

After the public installation is complete, the Cultural Center team will begin working on a hands-on educational art project using marine debris and other un-recycled plastics, in coordination with teachers at Oceanlake and Taft Elementary Schools, Taft 7-12 and local independent schools. The goal is to provide a field trip and a curriculum-based art-making experience for every school-age child in the north Lincoln County area.

Want to help? The Cultural Center is looking for the following local assistance as they prepare for this unprecedented Washed Ashore exhibit:
Volunteer docents (training provided by Washed Ashore)
Community partners (conservation, art or civic groups to hold coordinated events)
Additional monetary donations (in any amount)
To learn more or get involved, contact LCCC’s executive director, Niki Price, at 541-994-9994 or niki@lc-cc.org. The Lincoln City Cultural Center is located at 540 NE Hwy. 101, inside the historic Delake School.

MORE about Angela Haseltine Pozzi and Washed Ashore
Find bios of Pozzi and the Washed Ashore team here: https://www.washedashore.org/meet-the-washed-ashore-team/
In August 2021, Pozzi was featured as a Nautica “Wavemaker”: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SWz5FrWHEX4
In March 2020, she was profiled in The New York Times: https://tinyurl.com/vrp7jkf

“Angela Haseltine Pozzi is a creator of worlds, with imagination as strong as Dr. Seuss and a technique as detailed as assemblage artist Joseph Cornell.” Victoria Blake, Visual Arts Gallery Guide.

Must’ve come from the Far East!!!

Newport was having “a ball” this Monday morning,  A five foot floating ball, covered with fishing line cordage and sea life washed up at high tide.  From Japan??? Photo: Marvin Straus

A 5 foot ball covered with fishing net and sea life washed ashore this morning.  Marvin Straus, guitar6picker@outlook.com

Somebody failed to check out the integrity of their lines!

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