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Letter to the Editor: “We can have it if we want it badly enough!”

Editorial Comment by Joanne Cvar

The 2016 election campaign is bringing media attention to health care reform, including scare tactics about the cost and viability of comprehensive universal health care.

Contrary to claims that comprehensive quality health care for everyone in the country would “break the bank,” such existing systems in Canada and Scotland spend about 40% less for universal health care coverage than we spend for our system, with better outcomes. And the Affordable Care Act currently leaves about 33 million people uninsured and many more under-insured.

Surprisingly,the cost of health care coverage for all those uninsured Americans would not raise taxes as much as the media claims. As it turns out, taxpayers already pay two-thirds of the health care dollar in the US. In addition to Medicare and Medicaid. the VA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, American taxpayers, including the uninsured, pick up the tab for the benefit costs of state and federal public employees like teachers, FBI agents, firefighters and members of Congress. We also pay for the tax subsidy granted by the ACA to private health insurance, about $326 billion a year, expected to increase to $538.9 billion by 2024.

An expanded Medicare for All system in the US would result in massive savings in administrative costs. Canada and Scotland, with universal health care, pay about 16.7 cents of the health care dollar for billing and administration, while we pay about 31 cents here. We could save $400 billion annually on paperwork alone, enough to cover all of the uninsured and eliminate co-payments and deductibles for the rest of us..Without those savings, there is no way to pay for expanded coverage.

We already pay for universal health care. We just aren’t getting it. We need to counter the misinformation the media is spreading with the facts. Voters will support new taxes if they know the money will be well spent to bring health care justice to the USA at last.

It’s a great day to get vaccinated!!! “Cuz you don’t want the flu messin’ up two weeks of your life!

Those germs do get around….
Commons photo

The start of Autumn means the start of influenza season, and public health officials say now is the best time—when the number of flu cases in Oregon is still low—to get vaccinated.

While it’s difficult to forecast exactly how bad the flu season will be this year, health officials say getting a flu shot is the best way to prepare for however it shapes up.

Flu is a virus that causes mild to severe respiratory illness and can lead to hospitalization. The virus kills thousands of people in the U.S. each year. People at higher risk of severe illness or death include children, adults older than 65, pregnant women and those with chronic medical conditions or weak immune systems.

Click here for details

The flu vaccine is the best protection against flu. It can take up to two weeks to become effective, so getting it earlier in the season is ideal. Vaccinations are recommended for everyone 6 months of age and older.

Ways that we can all help prevent the flu:

* Stay home and limit contact with others if you are sick, including staying home from work or school when you are sick.
* Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze. Throw the tissue out when you are done.
* Wash hands with soap and water. Use an alcohol-based hand rub if soap and water are not available.
* Avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth.
* Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects that may have flu germs on them.
* Avoid getting coughed and sneezed on.

Flu vaccine is available from health care providers, local health departments and many pharmacies. To find flu vaccine clinic, visit the OHA flu prevention website at http://www.flu.oregon.gov/ and use OHA’s flu vaccine locator tool.

Click here for details

Lincoln County Sheriff’s Deputies and other law enforcement sweep county of wanted persons

Lincoln County law enforcement has successfully completed its 8th annual countywide sweep to arrest offenders on outstanding warrants for family violence related charges, as well as compliance checks of registered sex offenders residing in Lincoln County. The local enforcement campaign was part of the National Family Violence Apprehension Detail which involves dozens of police agencies and hundreds of law enforcement officers nationwide.

The District Attorney’s Office, Lincoln County Sheriffs Office, Lincoln City Police Department, Newport Police Department, Oregon State Police, Toledo Police Department, and Lincoln County Community Corrections conducted the Domestic Violence Enhanced Response Team sweep in all areas of Lincoln County on Tuesday, October 12, 2010. The fifteen officer team made 182 registered sex offender contacts to verify compliance with registered sex offender requirements, and made 88 warrant arrest attempts. The effort of the participating officers resulted in the identification of 20 registered sex offenders who were out of compliance.

Arrest warrants will be requested for these subjects for Fail to register as a sex offender.

Sheriff Dennis Dotson stated, “The coordination and cooperation between the law enforcement agencies in Lincoln County was the principal reason for the success of this campaign. The officers involved in the sweep worked as a team and made contacts in and out of their respective jurisdictions. This effort is but one more example of our officers’, troopers’ and deputies’ commitment to making Lincoln County a safer place to live.”

(Authorized by Committee to Elect Patricia Patrick-Joling)

GP wants help expanding operations at their plant in Toledo.

Toledo GP Mill – wants to try a new angle to recycle corrugated container board.

Georgia-Pacific this week reached out to the Lincoln County Commission and the city of Toledo to help them fund an innovative way to recycle various varieties of corrugated cardboard to extend the life of the materials that go into consumer packaging. GP Public Relations Manager CJ Drake said the state of Oregon is offering state-backed financial assistance, coupled with some other financial machinations, that would help GP better finance the project. Oregon state-sponsored Strategic Investment Programs are literally starting up all over Oregon where cities big and small are trying to bring economic growth to their home towns.

GP wants to build what it calls the Juno Project that squeezes out another step in recycling consumer containers. If the process works, and GP says there’s a lot of evidence it does work, it could extend the wood resources that go into box-making, technically saving money for everyone along the product purchasing continuum.

Drake told the County Commission that a partnership with Toledo and Lincoln County would re-arrange property tax payments within the Toledo city limits for a 15 year period while the new Juno Recycling System is built and perfected. To compensate for the partial loss of the growth in property taxes GP would agree to pay a Community Services Fee – how much and for how long would be determined by the county and the City of Toledo. GP would have to agree to the amount set by the city and the county. Public schools would not be affected.

Drake said GP is optimistic that the new technology can be perfected at their Toledo plant and make it even more financially muscular with resulting higher tax revenues to the county and to Toledo. Drake declined to predict how many new jobs would be created – if any.

There was a lot to think about – including the commissioners wanting to chew on the details a bit longer and have GP bring it back before them for further discussions that they hope will clarify the project.

Wild Family Wednesday at Newport Library

Join us for Newport Public Library’s, FREE and exciting family event! Join us for Wild Family Wednesday! Students, grades K – 5th with a parent or guardian, are invited to a FREE “Bookmark Challenge” event. Create your own bookmark and look for it this summer during “A Universe of Stories” Summer Reading at the library. Collect them all summer long. Drop in during this fun event that begins at 2:45 pm and ends by 4:30 pm on Wednesday, June 5th in the McEntee Room, at the Newport Public Library.

Come and enjoy a fun activity for the whole family! The Newport Public Library will provide all supplies.

Not sure what your kids might want to read? While you are here, ask one of our staff members to recommend a picture book, new fiction book or award winner. We have something for everyone.

Hope to see you soon for “Bookmark Challenge”.

Any questions please call the Newport Public Library at 541-265-2153.

How to Recover from a Mid-Life Financial Crisis

Duane J. Silbernagel
Financial Advisor
Waddell & Reed
541-614-1322

How to Recover from a Mid-Life Financial Crisis
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel, CFP®

A financial crisis can be scary at any age, but this is especially true when you’re in your 40s or 50s. Perhaps you’re way behind on saving for retirement or have too much debt from unnecessary spending. Or maybe an unexpected challenge, such as a job loss, illness, or break from the workforce for caregiving responsibilities, took a direct hit on your finances.

Regardless of how you got to this point, it’s important to develop a strategy that will help you re-establish financial stability.

Regain control

Start by accepting the reality of your situation. This may be easier said than done when you’d rather avoid the anxiety, stress, and guilt that you may feel when you have money issues. It’s okay to feel these negative emotions as part of the recovery process. They are likely to pass with time as you come up with a plan to regain control.

Review your spending

Another step is to create a budget to help establish a positive cash flow. If you’re spending more money than you earn, you’ll
need to cut back on your discretionary spending immediately. If you’ve made cuts and your monthly income still isn’t enough, you’ll need to figure out a way to cut your fixed expenses or increase your income.

Reduce your debt

It’s likely that debt is one of the reasons why you’re facing a financial crisis. One survey found that people between the ages of 45 and 54 reported the highest amounts of debt overall, totaling $134,600.1

To reduce your overall debt, identify the amount and interest rate for each obligation you have. Then tackle it by paying off the debt with the highest interest rate first, then the next highest, and so on.

You might also consider restructuring your debt. This involves negotiating new repayment terms with creditors so you can meet your monthly expenses and pay off your debts within a reasonable amount of time. If you can’t afford to hire a professional credit counselor to help you manage or restructure your debt, check with your local Consumer Credit Counseling Service (CCCS) office or another nonprofit credit counseling service to receive assistance at low or no cost.  You should also consider other options, such as seeking part-time work for extra income or liquidating assets, that can help you pay off debt more quickly.

Rebuild your funds

Chances are you’ve drained your emergency savings fund. If so, you’ll need to build it back up. Otherwise, you’ll risk racking up credit card debt or dipping into your retirement savings when the next crisis hits.

It’s okay to start small. Set aside a percentage of your paycheck each pay period to go into your cash reserve. Continue adding money after reaching your goal.

Revisit your financial relationships

In order to prevent another financial crisis, what changes will you need to make to your current financial relationships? Consider the following.

• Career. Do you need to increase your income with a second or a part-time job? Is there room for growth in your current career, or should you consider additional education or training to help boost your earnings?

• Home. Do you currently live in an expensive location? Does it make sense to downsize your home or move to a lower-cost area?

• Family. If you’re financially supporting adult children, can you reduce or discontinue it? Similarly, if you support your elderly parents, can your adult sibling(s) share the financial burden of care?

• Habits. Do you overspend to reward yourself? Are you an emotional shopper? Do you buy things you actually want, or are you just trying to keep up with the Joneses?

• Health. Can you make a lifestyle change to improve your health to help avoid future issues and potentially reduce medical costs? Some of these changes will require careful research (e.g., moving or changing careers), whereas others can be easier to implement (e.g., avoiding shopping sprees or reducing aid to adult children).

Reassess your finances periodically

As you get back on the right financial track, it’s critical to monitor your progress. Failure to do so in the past might have contributed to your crisis, so make it a habit to periodically review your finances. You might benefit from working with a financial professional who can help you stay on track with your financial goals as your situation changes.

2016 Survey of Consumer Finances, Federal Reserve Board (most recent data available)

Only 48% of workers ages 45 to 54 are confident that they will have enough money to last throughout their retirement.

Source: 2018 Retirement Confidence Survey, Employee Benefit Research Institute

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website:
www.duane.wrfa.com
Thank you for your interest.

Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com. 
This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. The article was written by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. (Copyright 2019) and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (05/19)

Sen. Merkley wants federal workers to divest from fossil fuels

Sen. Merkley wants to make it easy for federal employees to bail out of fossil fuel stocks….


New bill will give federal employees the option to invest retirement savings in funds free of fossil fuel resources

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon’s Senator Jeff Merkley today introduced the Retirement Investments for a Sustainable Economy (RISE) Act of 2019, which gives federal employees the ability to divest from the fossil fuel industry—and reduce the financial liability of fossil fuel asset losses—by offering a Climate Choice investment option for the Thrift Savings Plan (TSP).

“Americans are seeing the growing climate crisis driving catastrophic wildfires, deadly storms and hurricanes, and devastating droughts, and lots of people don’t want to wait around for these risks to grow,” said Merkley. “If people want to get their money out of the industry driving climate chaos, they should be able to. It’s time for Congress to give millions of federal employees the power to ensure their retirement funds are invested in a less risky and more sustainable, socially responsible portfolio.”

Studies have shown that portfolios without fossil fuels have outperformed those with fossil fuels in recent years. That is why in April 2019, Senator Merkley and Senator Maggie Hassan (D-NH) wrote a letter to the U.S. Government Accountability Office (GAO) to examine the risks to federal workers of continuing fossil fuel investments as climate chaos continues to intensify.

Creating a fossil-fuel free option would not only allow TSP participants the ability to align their retirement investments with their values, it could also help participants mitigate their own financial risks. As the climate threat grows and more and more of the world transitions to clean and renewable energy, holding shares in fossil fuel companies may risk bigger and bigger losses for investors.

As of December 2018, the TSP has approximately 5.5 million participants with approximately $558 billion in assets, and is the largest defined contribution plan in the world.

Newport First Baptist Donates West Area Schools with a Welcomed Gift

Newport First Baptist Blesses West Area Schools with a Significant Gift

 Easter Sunday Offerings Were Given as $4,000 to Spend on Students in Need

Photo of Pastor Angel, Principal of Yaquina View Elementary, Kristin Becker, Pastor Glen, and Pastor Marcus of Newport First Baptist 

On Friday, April 26, Pastor Glen, Pastor Marcus, and Pastor Angel of Newport First Baptist Church visited  Yaquina View Elementary, Sam Case Elementary, Newport Middle School, and Newport High School and presented each of the four area principals with a check for $1,000 to spend on supporting students at West Area schools. Pastor Glen Small explained how this came about, “For the church, Easter is about celebrating God’s perfect provision to meet our greatest need. As we anticipated celebrating on Resurrection Sunday, we wanted to find some practical way that we could mirror the heart of God by addressing specific needs. The plan was to receive an offering from the congregation on Easter Sunday with the intention of giving it all away…The checks were given with the instruction, “Use this money at your discretion to meet the needs that aren’t funded through the regular sources.”

Plans to use the funds at all the West Area schools are centered on feeding and giving supplies to the families and students in need at the schools. Sam Case Elementary School Principal Shelley Moore was, “Overwhelmed with gratitude for this gift of love. Sam Case has been trying to figure out how to start an on-campus food pantry for our students and families and this will get us well on our way!” Principal Kristin Becker of Yaquina View Elementary gave the pastors hugs and teared up at being able to support many more children than she’d originally thought she’d be able to this year. “We will spend that money to purchase additional gift cards for families when we have run out of cards we receive for use at JC Market by an anonymous benefactor. The cards from the benefactor tend to come around the winter holidays and then late spring. We are putting this money from Newport First Baptist Church into the fund so that we can purchase cards during that in-between time. Our families do call us (thanks in large part to the connections of our Family Advocate, Tami Harris, with our families) to let us know they are hungry.”

The Lincoln County School District has identified 849 students, K-12, who are without permanent housing and are receiving assistance through our Homeless Education and Literacy Project. “We are always in need of donations and appreciate the kindness of the Newport First Baptist Church for supporting these students,” said Dr. Karen Gray, Superintendent of Lincoln County School District.

Governor Brown orders stricter oversight of child welfare issues…

Governor Brown Creates Child Welfare Oversight Board to Address Immediate Issues in Child Welfare

(Salem, OR) — Governor Kate Brown today issued an executive order that establishes the Child Welfare Oversight Board to advise her direction to the Department of Human Services (DHS) so it can more effectively address Oregon’s child welfare crisis.

“Oregon’s child welfare system is overburdened to the point where I have serious concerns about the state’s ability to sufficiently serve our most vulnerable children,” said Governor Brown. “While DHS is working on long-term solutions to right-size the foster care system, there needs to be immediate action to protect children in care today. That’s why today I am establishing a Child Welfare Oversight Board and bringing in additional resources and expertise.”

Executive Order 19-03 establishes the board and outlines its areas of focus. The Governor will also deploy a crisis management team to implement the Board’s recommendations and embed a senior member of the Governor’s Office staff at DHS to ensure directives are implemented.

The Board will advise Governor Brown on issues including:

  • Out-of-state foster child placements, including assessing each child that is being housed out of state and finding a placement in Oregon.
  • Building system capacity, including therapeutic foster care, general foster care, and services for children with specialized needs.
  • Addressing agency operational challenges, such as public records and communications, hiring, and human resources.

Governor Brown is also directing DHS and the Child Welfare Program to use their authority to suspend or amend any agency policies or rules that make it difficult to address challenges in the child welfare system. This could include policies or rules related to hiring or contracting.

“Oregon’s challenges in foster care have been long-standing, and our children and families deserve better,” said Governor Brown. “We need to mobilize quickly if we want to improve the lives of those in Oregon’s foster care system.

“I also want to be clear that the child welfare system belongs to all of us as Oregonians, not just DHS or state government. Part of the reform in child welfare is engaging communities in being part of the solution.”

DHS partners with Every Child Oregon to connect community members with volunteer opportunities to help children and families.

PCH enlists more eyes on the prize of patients getting well…

Click here for details

Newport hospital seeks community members to serve as patient advisors

Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital (SPCH) in Newport invites citizens to serve as patient advisors to help enhance services provided at the hospital and clinics.
 
Patient advisors are part of ongoing efforts to improve patient satisfaction, provide feedback for health care providers and promote a better understanding of health care among patients and the community. Patient advisors are asked to serve one to two-year terms, attending periodic Patient and Family Advisory Council meetings, to share patient and family member perspectives, and to provide honest feedback. This commitment requires about 1-4 hours each month.

“Our Patient Family Advisory Council plays an important role in helping the hospital provide the very best care of patients,” said Cindy Cabrera, director of the hospital’s Quality Resources Department. “We listen carefully to our advisors’ feedback and suggestions and work to make changes in areas that need improvement. We are looking for advisory team members who want to help us become better.”

Anyone, age 18 or older, who has been a patient or has had a family member who was a patient at SPCH within the last three years is encouraged to apply to be a patient advisor. Other qualifications include the ability to listen and communicate well, look beyond his or her own health care experiences to assist others in their health and wellness needs, contribute in a productive way, respect diverse perspectives and opinions and maintain patient and family privacy outside the health care setting. 

To apply for a patient advisor position, please contact the SPCH Quality Resources Department at 541-574-4866.

Library fine amnesty at Driftwood Public Library, Lincoln City

Lincoln City City Hall
and Library (2nd floor)

Last fall, Driftwood Public Library and the Lincoln City City Council agreed to eliminate daily overdue fines on library materials, ensuring patrons would no longer be assessed five cents per day per item returned late. On February 11th, the City Council took things one step further, and moved to forgive outstanding overdue fines on patron accounts.

The library has completed an audit of accounts blocked due to overdue fines of $25 or more, and has restored 439 accounts to good standing. This means that more than four hundred people – including 131 children — will once again be able to use the library. In conducting the audit, library staff learned that the most common items that were returned overdue were children’s items.

In January, the American Library Association’s governing council released a resolution identifying monetary library fines as an economic barrier to library use, and encouraging libraries to re-assess the collection of fines. However, the issue has been a topic of interest for Library Director Kirsten Brodbeck-Kenney for much longer. “We held a major fine amnesty back in 2016, offering to forgive overdue fines for anyone who came to the library,” she says, “and what we found is that for many people, even the fear of having a library fine was enough to keep them away. We also learned that research doesn’t support the idea that fines encourage people to bring their items back on time.” For patrons such as children, teens, and people with disabilities who rely on others for transportation to the library, the risk of running up large fines is greater, and these same patrons often lack the monetary resources to return their account to good standing. “For someone on a fixed income,” says Brodbeck-Kenney, “accumulating $25 in fines might mean that they have to choose between groceries or using the library. We don’t want folks to have to make that choice.”

Patrons will still be expected to return their items to the library on time. If an item is kept for six weeks past the due date, the patron will receive a bill for the cost of the item. This bill will be automatically removed from the account if the item is returned to the library in good condition.

All residents of Lincoln County are eligible to receive a library card at Driftwood Public Library. All that is required is photo ID showing your Lincoln County address. If you’re new to the area and haven’t changed your ID over yet, bring your current photo ID along with something that shows your name and your physical Lincoln County address (a utility bill or piece of first-class mail are the most common documents we can accept). Visiting? No proof of address? No problem. DPL offers a Provisional Card to those who are in the area temporarily or who cannot provide proof of address. This card allows for two check-outs at a time as well as access to the library’s electronic materials. It is good for 90 days and can be renewed. Library staff encourage anyone who is not sure if they qualify for a card to call or stop by the library!

For more information, please contact Kirsten Brodbeck-Kenney at 541-996-1251, or via email at kbrodbeck-kenney@lincolncity.org. Driftwood Public Library is located at 801 SW HWY 101 in Lincoln City on the 2nd floor of the City Hall building, across the street from

What kind parks do Newport residents want and where??

Newport Parks and Recreation Center


Calling community members of all ages! The City would like your feedback
on the draft Park System Master Plan during a public workshop Wednesday, March 27th at the Newport Recreation Center, Room 117, 225 SE Avery Street. It runs from 5 to 7 pm

City official says they want to hear everyone’s thoughts about future potential improvements to parks, trails, and open spaces in Newport, including existing and new park facilities.

Those who attend the workshop will:
– Learn about project work that has been completed to-date.
– Provide input on recommended improvements to parks, trails.
– Comment on the draft Park System Master Plan. All ages are welcome!
– Refreshments will be provided.

Your feedback at this event will help inform the long range plan for Newport’s Park System. You have an opportunity to help shape the community’s future. We want to hear from you!

Click here for info

For those who cannot attend in person, a survey and online version of the Open House are available at this link through Monday, April 1: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/NewportOpenHouse3

For more information, contact:
Rachel Cotton, Associate Planner, City of Newport
r.cotton@newportoregon.gov
541-574-3341

Surface Rescue

Click here for details

Vacation Rental Dwelling issue still hanging…

Vacation Rental Dwellings
Good source of room tax revenues as well as complaints from the neighbors.

The Newport City Council got an earful from both sides of the Vacation Rental Dwelling issue Monday night. Those who favor opening up the city to VRDs more widely across the city were opposed by those who are primarily permanent residents who don’t want the noise, the trash and parking problems that VRDs frequently cause.

Proposals involve VRD-protected areas of town that have rules and regulations to prevent nuisance issues versus areas of town where VRDs would remain banned. The other proposal is to open up the whole city for VRDs with enhanced strict enforcement of VRDs and dramatically stepped up code enforcement.

Predictably, permanent residents of Newport complain about VRD invasions of their neighborhoods that dramatically lower their quality of life, if not their property values. Then others, mostly VRD owners or property management firms that manage VRDs say, if the city tries to cluster VRDs in areas near commercial or tourism services there might be a flurry of VRD-owner lawsuits even if the changes were made over a five or ten period.

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One VRD owner said their industry brings in a lot of money to Newport and they want that to continue. But another citizen indicated that permanent residents and centers of employment like NOAA and HMSC and normal tourism facilities contribute far more to the community and should not be discounted. And that if the number of VRDs expand, it will only make affordable housing that much harder to find.

Others like Newport resident Lon Brusselback pointed out that the city Planning Commission recommended consolidating VRDs in limited areas near tourism and shopping facilities to give regular neighborhoods a break from the noise and excessive parking created by VRDs. He and others told the council that city planning staff is recommending just the opposite by advocating VRDs be allowed in wider areas of the city, thereby disrupting the quality of life of those living in those neighborhoods.

Click here for details

The city council acknowledged this “great divide” of opinion and scheduled another city council workshop (no public testimony) for April 1st, 3pm at City Hall. Whatever course changes are produced will be forwarded to a formal city council session for May 6th for possible final decision on where VRDs should be allowed around town.

On another topic, Newport Fire Chief Rob Murphy asked the city council to authorize formal negotiations with their next-door neighbor fire district, the Newport Rural Fire District. The Rural Fire District contracts for fire services with Newport Fire by collecting property taxes levied on their homes and businesses that are outside the Newport City Limits. These contract services have been in effect for years, but the rural district is now interested in consolidating with Newport, and forwarding their tax dollars either to the city or to a whole new fire protection district that would encompass both Newport and the rural areas around it.

Click here for details

The city council seemed to be taken aback by the idea but none-the-less gave the go-ahead to explore what such a merger might accomplish. No details were discussed – it’s strictly exploratory and may take a couple of years to hammer out the details. Therefore, no immediate changes are contemplated.

The proposed merger mirrors other consolidation efforts between North Lincoln County and the Depoe Bay Fire Districts. That merger could be a couple of years away as well.

Newport Fire Department
Low priority calls wasting NFD’s time and money. A fix is now in place.

And Chief Murphy and the head of PacWest Ambulance got permission from the city council to give relief to the fire department from having to respond to most medical calls around town. Chief Murphy reminded the council that most medical calls automatically trigger the activation of PacWest Ambulance and a city fire truck. And there has been a dramatic increase in the number of calls for helping someone get up off the floor after a fall, inside or outside their homes, or for a simple transport to the hospital.

Click here for details

Chief Murphy says most calls are a waste of time and money for the fire department which does not get reimbursed for such activations. There’s also instances when a fire truck crew is at a medical call and a real emergency, like a car wreck or a house fire catches them flat-footed, causing a delayed response to the real emergency. But if an ambulance crew really needs extra help from the fire department, Newport Fire-Rescue will respond to the scene.

The council gave their blessing to the “as needed” protocol. Chief Murphy and the manager of PacWest shook hands and committed themselves to the new procedures.

Click here for details

Lincoln City endorses battle against Climate Change as well as Traffic Speeders

Carbon Dioxide concentrations in the Earth’s Atmosphere over the past 400,000 years.

The Lincoln City City Council Monday night endorsed the Audubon Society’s call for everyone on planet Earth to do all they can to combat Climate Change.  Rapidly rising sea levels would definitely affect Lincoln City, especially south of town where the Siletz River flows into the ocean.  Rising sea levels would likely inundate the Siletz Highway and Highway 101.

Here’s the resolution from the Audubon Society as adopted by the City Council:

A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY OF LINCOLN CITY RECOGNIZING CLIMATE CHANGE AWARENESS

WHEREAS, climate change, created by atmospheric warming caused by greenhouse gases, has reached a critical level; and

WHEREAS, science has shown that climate change is a result of human activity; and

WHEREAS, climate change on the Oregon coast will result in higher wave heights, more powerful winter storms, shoreline erosion, rising sea level and tidal height, hypoxic nearshore ocean waters, seasonal temperature changes, more acidic ocean waters, and changes in forest cover; and

WHEREAS, the impact of addressing the effects of climate change on the Oregon coast may be measured in lost lives, economic losses, an increased cost of living; and

WHEREAS, climate change has a profound effect on the residents and visitors of the City of Lincoln City and the Oregon coast; and

WHEREAS, it is incumbent upon everyone to seek innovative solutions to reduce the impact of climate change on the atmosphere, oceans, forests, fisheries, and energy and water sources; and

WHEREAS, it is important for the City of Lincoln City to be a leader on the Oregon coast in seeking solutions to this crisis.

NOW, THEREFORE, be it resolved by the City Council of the City of Lincoln City, Oregon, that we hereby urge the residents and visitors of the City of Lincoln City, Oregon, to do their part in reducing climate change impacts by seeking innovative solutions to this global problem.

We further urge residents and visitors to promote by example, energy efficiency, a healthy  environment, and a sustainable economy to address the serious impacts facing our Earth.

Click here for info

Active radar signs to slow down drivers.

The City Council also wants to tackle a problem that most cities have and that’s speeders.  A traffic study was conducted recently that showed that roughly 15% of motorists driving Highway 101 and other busy stretches of pavement with the city limits are violating the speed limit – some more than others.

City Manager Ron Chandler offered a number of tactics to slow down that 15% but said he preferred solar powered speed reading signs which he claims are very effective at slowing traffic.  They can also be moved around town to slow down drivers on other stretches of 101 and major arterials.

No final decision was made but it seemed apparent that the solar signs may well be the preferred option.

Surface Rescue

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Power generators urge energy conservation

Bonneville Dam
BPA wants us all to cut back and use energy efficient light bulbs.


Unseasonably cold temperatures, low stream flows for hydropower production, transmission import constraints and high natural gas constraints are putting pressure on the regional electricity system. BPA is taking steps to increase power supplies and reduce consumer demand to keep the federal power system operating smoothly and support regional reliability.

“It’s always a good idea to use electricity wisely, and it’s even more important when supplies are tight,” says Elliot Mainzer, BPA administrator.

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As temperatures are forecast to remain unseasonably cool across much of the region through the first week of March, BPA is asking customers to reduce energy use when possible to relieve stress on the power system.

“It’s supposed to be sunny over the next three days, so we’re asking customers to open their shades on south-facing windows and use the natural warmth of the sun to help heat their home,” said Snohomish County Public Utility District spokesperson Aaron Swaney. “We’re also asking them to turn the thermostat down a couple of degrees to give their furnace a break.”

Surface Rescue

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“With regional weather continuing to be colder and snowier than usual, we always appreciate efforts by energy consumers to reduce their energy usage whenever possible,” Mark Johnson, Flathead Electric Cooperative general manager.

Tips for saving energy can be found here.

Staff Recommended 2019 Pacific Halibut Sport Regulations

Yaquina Bay Charters photo


Staff Recommended 2019 Pacific Halibut Sport Regulations

The International Pacific Halibut Commission (IPHC) approved catch limits for fisheries off of the US West Coast that are approximately 25% higher than the catch limits in 2018. Based on that catch limit, ODFW staff recommended season dates are below:

Columbia River Subarea

All-Depth Season: Open on Thurs May 2, Sun May 5, Thurs May 9, Sun May 12, Fri May 24 (this is not a typo, date is supposed to be on Friday), and Sun May 26. If any quota remains after those dates, can be open every Thurs and Sun until the quota is taken or Sept. 30. Quota = 14,627 pounds.

These dates came from a public request and were chose because they line up with openings in the other Washington subareas and will should prevent the effort shift seen in 2018, when this subarea opened a week earlier than any other subarea in WA or OR.

Nearshore: Open Mon-Wed, inside the 40-fathom line off of Oregon, beginning May 6, through the quota being caught of Sept 30. Quota = 500 pounds.

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Central Oregon Coast Subarea

Spring All-Depth Season:

Fixed Dates: May 9-11; May 16-18; May 23-25; May 30-June 1; and June 6-8.
Back-up dates, available if quota remains: June 20-22; July 4-6; and July 18-20.
Quota = 171,103 pounds.
For the Central Oregon Coast spring all-depth fixed dates, based on input from this weeks’ public meeting and the online survey, staff are recommending 15 fixed dates, without skipping any weeks due to tides. With the 25% increase in quota, there was a fair bit of discussion about 15 days vs. 18 days. Some wanted as much opportunity as possible to catch the spring quota. Others wanted to be a little precautionary with how many fixed dates, so that the summer all-depth season isn’t impacted (any overage from the spring fishery comes out of the summer). An additional consideration was the timing of back-up dates compared to dates for the directed commercial fishery. The ODFW staff recommendation is based on trying to balance all of those considerations.

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Summer All-Depth Season: opens Aug 2-3, then every other Fri and Sat until the earlier of the quota being caught or Oct 31. Quota = 67,898 pounds.

Nearshore: Opens June 1, seven days per week, inside the 40-fathom line, through the earlier of the quota being caught or Oct 31. Quota = 32,591 pounds.

Southern Oregon Subarea: opens May 1, seven days per week through the earlier of the quota being caught or Oct 31. Quota = 11,322 pounds.

A map with all of this information on it can be found at: https://www.dfw.state.or.us/MRP/finfish/halibut/seasonmaps/2019_halibut_map.pdf

Additional information about sport halibut fisheries can be found on ODFW’s halibut webpage.

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Hybrid Funds: Balanced, Lifestyle or Target?

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Duane J. Silbernagel
Financial Advisor
Waddell & Reed
541-614-1322

Hybrid Funds: Balanced, Lifestyle, or Target?
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel, CFP®

Holding a mix of stocks and bonds is fundamental to building a portfolio that can pursue growth while potentially remaining more stable than a stock-only portfolio during market downturns. Many investors approach this goal by owning a mix of individual securities, a mix of funds, or both. However, some hybrid funds try to follow the same strategy in a single investment.

Although the goal of these funds is simplicity, they are not as simple as they may appear, and different types of hybrid funds have very different objectives.

Balanced funds

Balanced funds typically strive for a specific asset mix — for example, 60% stocks and 40% bonds — but the balance might vary within limits spelled out in the prospectus. Theoretically, the stocks in the fund provide the potential for gains while the bonds may help reduce the effects of market volatility.

Generally, balanced funds have three objectives: conserve principal, provide income, and pursue long-term growth. Of course, there is no guarantee that a fund will meet its objectives. If you are investing in a balanced fund or considering whether to do so, you should understand the fund’s asset mix, objectives, and rebalancing guidelines as the asset mix changes due to market performance. Rebalancing is typically necessary to keep a balanced fund on track, but could create a taxable event for investors.

Lifestyle funds

Lifestyle funds, also called target-risk funds, include a mix of assets designed to maintain a consistent level of risk. These funds may be labeled with terms such as conservative, moderate, or aggressive. Because the targeted risk level remains consistent over time, you may want to shift assets from one lifestyle fund to another as you approach retirement or retire. A conservative lifestyle fund might be an appropriate holding throughout retirement.

Target-date funds

Target-date funds contain a mix of assets selected for a specific time horizon. The target date, usually included in the fund’s name, is the approximate date when an investor would withdraw money for retirement or another purpose, such as paying for college. An investor expecting to retire in 2035, for example, might choose a 2035 fund. As the target date approaches, the fund typically shifts toward a more conservative asset allocation to help conserve the value it may have accumulated. This transition is driven by a formula called the glide path, which determines how the asset mix will change over time. The glide path may end at the target date or continue to shift assets beyond the target date.

Funds with the same target date may vary not only in their glide path but also in the underlying asset allocation, investment holdings, turnover rate, fees, and fund performance. Variation tends to be greater as funds near their target date. If you own a target-date fund and are nearing the target date, be sure you understand the asset mix and whether the glide path extends beyond the target date.

All in one?

Traditional balanced funds typically contain a mix of individual securities. Although these funds may be an appropriate core holding for a diversified portfolio, they are generally not intended to be an investor’s only holding. However, some balanced funds and most lifestyle and target-date funds include a mix of other funds. These “funds of funds” are often intended to offer an all-in-one portfolio investment. You may still want to hold other investments, but keep in mind that investing outside of an all-in-one fund may change your overall asset allocation. Asset allocation and diversification are widely accepted methods to help manage investment risk; they do not guarantee a profit or protect against investment loss.

Additional considerations

The principal value of a target-date fund is not guaranteed before, on, or after the target date. There is no guarantee that you will be prepared for retirement on the target date or that any fund will meet its stated goals. The return and principal value of all funds fluctuate with changes in market conditions. Shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost.

Mutual funds are sold by prospectus. Please consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus, which contains this and other information about the investment company, can be obtained from your financial professional. Be sure to read the prospectus carefully before deciding whether to invest.

Although the goal of hybrid funds is simplicity, they are not as simple as they may appear, and different types of hybrid funds have very different objectives.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website:
www.duane.wrfa.com

Thank you for your interest.

Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com. 
This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. The article was written by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. (Copyright 2018) and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (01/19)

Hybrid Funds: Balanced, Lifestyle or Target??

Click here for Details


Duane Silbernagel
Waddell & Reed

Hybrid Funds: Balanced, Lifestyle, or Target?
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel, CFP®

Holding a mix of stocks and bonds is fundamental to building a portfolio that can pursue growth while potentially remaining more stable than a stock-only portfolio during market downturns. Many investors approach this goal by owning a mix of individual securities, a mix of funds, or both. However, some hybrid funds try to follow the same strategy in a single investment.

Although the goal of these funds is simplicity, they are not as simple as they may appear, and different types of hybrid funds have very different objectives.

Balanced funds

Balanced funds typically strive for a specific asset mix — for example, 60% stocks and 40% bonds — but the balance might vary within limits spelled out in the prospectus. Theoretically, the
stocks in the fund provide the potential for gains while the bonds may help reduce the effects of market volatility.

Generally, balanced funds have three objectives: conserve principal, provide income, and pursue long-term growth. Of course, there is no guarantee that a fund will meet its objectives. If you are investing in a balanced fund or considering whether to do so, you should understand the fund’s asset mix, objectives, and rebalancing guidelines as the asset mix changes due to market performance. Rebalancing is typically necessary to keep a balanced fund on track, but could create a taxable event for investors.

Lifestyle funds

Lifestyle funds, also called target-risk funds, include a mix of assets designed to maintain a consistent level of risk. These funds may be labeled with terms such as conservative, moderate, or aggressive. Because the targeted risk level remains consistent over time, you may want to shift assets from one lifestyle fund to another as you approach retirement or retire. A conservative lifestyle fund might be an appropriate holding throughout retirement.

Target-date funds

Target-date funds contain a mix of assets selected for a specific time horizon. The target date, usually included in the fund’s name, is the approximate date when an investor would
withdraw money for retirement or another purpose, such as paying for college. An investor expecting to retire in 2035, for example, might choose a 2035 fund. As the target date approaches, the fund typically shifts toward a more conservative asset allocation to help conserve the value it may have accumulated. This transition is driven by a formula called the glide path, which determines how the asset mix will change over time. The glide path may end at the target date or continue to shift assets beyond the target date.

Funds with the same target date may vary not only in their glide path but also in the underlying asset allocation, investment holdings, turnover rate, fees, and fund performance. Variation tends to be greater as funds near their target date. If you own a target-date fund and are nearing the target date, be sure you understand the asset mix and whether the glide path extends beyond the target date.

All in one?

Traditional balanced funds typically contain a mix of individual securities. Although these funds may be an appropriate core holding for a diversified portfolio, they are generally not intended to be an investor’s only holding. However, some balanced funds and most lifestyle and target-date funds include a mix of other funds. These “funds of funds” are often intended to offer an all-in-one portfolio investment. You may still want to hold other investments, but keep in mind that investing outside of an all-in-one fund may change your overall asset allocation. Asset allocation and diversification are widely accepted methods to help manage investment risk; they do not guarantee a profit or protect against investment loss.

Additional considerations

The principal value of a target-date fund is not guaranteed before, on, or after the target date. There is no guarantee that you will be prepared for retirement on the target date or that any fund will meet its stated goals. The return and principal value of all funds fluctuate with changes in market conditions. Shares, when sold, may be worth more or less than their original cost.

Mutual funds are sold by prospectus. Please consider the investment objectives, risks, charges, and expenses carefully before investing. The prospectus, which contains this and other information about the investment company, can be obtained from your financial professional. Be sure to read the prospectus carefully before deciding whether to invest.

Although the goal of hybrid funds is simplicity, they are not as simple as they may appear, and different types of hybrid funds have very different objectives.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website:
www.duane.wrfa.com

Thank you for your interest.
Duane Silbernagel is a Financial Advisor in Lincoln City, Oregon offering securities through Waddell & Reed, Inc., Member FINRA and SIPC. He can be reached at (541) 614-1322 or via email at DSilbernagel@wradvisors.com. 
This article is meant to be general in nature and should not be construed as investment or financial advice related to your personal situation. The article was written by an independent third party, Broadridge Investor Communication Solutions, Inc. (Copyright 2018) and is provided for informational and educational purposes only. Waddell& Reed is not affiliated with www.newslincolncounty.com website and is not responsible for any other content posted to this website.  (01/19)

LC Schools Superintendent Dr. Karen Gray wants you to know….

Community Learning and Sharing: Conversations with Dr. Karen Gray
Tuesday, January 29⋅6:00 – 7:30 pm
Sam Case Elementary
459 NE 12th St, Newport, OR 97365

Description: These are sessions with Dr. Karen Gray, new Superintendent of Lincoln County School District, on a topic of learning in our schools. This first session is on Restorative Justice is a way of managing social expectations in a restorative rather than punitive manner. Come learn more about what it is and how it relates to our teaching.

All are welcome! Pizza will be served. This is a family-friendly event but will be more for adults with children in our schools. Childcare provided.

Click here for details

Community Learning and Sharing: Conversations with Dr. Karen Gray
Wednesday, February 6⋅6:00 – 7:30 pm
Taft Elementary School
SE High School Dr, Lincoln City, OR 97367

Description: These are sessions with Dr. Karen Gray, new Superintendent of Lincoln County School District, on a topic of learning in our schools. This first session is on Restorative Justice. Restorative Justice is a way of managing social expectations in a restorative rather than punitive manner. Come to learn more about what it is and how it relates to our teaching.

All are welcome! Pizza will be served. This is a family-friendly event but will be more for adults with children in our schools. Childcare provided.

Click here for details

The Sweet Adelines are recruiting new members!!

It’s a new year and a new opportunity for women from 14 to 90 plus to sing with Sweet Adelines. The chorus is a part of the international sweet adelines that provides education and training for creating good sound and performance. In Lincoln County, the chorus is under the direction of Paula Dahl. She says, “I like having new people and want to assure them that they do not need to read notes because we provide learning tapes.”

The chorus performs in the community and participates in the annual convention in Reno with two songs every three years. People who join will enjoy the sisterhood of the members and the great learning that is given by professionals who visit the chorus.

Anyone who sang as a teen has a chance to warm up her vocal chords and re-ignite the endorphins that come from singing.

Women are welcome to visit and check it out to see if the chorus is a fit for them.

Thank you,
Evelyn Brookhyser
541-265-8023

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