Truly liveable, durable and AFFORDABLE housing – steel frame housing at less than half the cost of conventional construction

 Daily News  Comments Off on Truly liveable, durable and AFFORDABLE housing – steel frame housing at less than half the cost of conventional construction
Nov 272016
 
960 sq. ft. $132,850

960 sq. ft.
$213,560

640 sq. ft. $89,400

640 sq. ft.
$129,275

320 sq. ft. $75,450

320 sq. ft.
$89,900

160 sq. ft. $49,635

160 sq. ft.
$49,625

320 sq. ft. 79,950

640 sq. ft.
$118,980

960 sq. ft. 124,900

960 sq. ft.
$146,900

960 sq. ft. $139,850

1,280 sq. ft.
$239,400

160 sq. ft. $46,980

160 sq. ft.
$46,980

320 sq. ft. (includes garage) 149,950

945 sq. ft. (includes garage)
$149,950

Typical interior rooms

Typical interior rooms

Typical Interior Rooms

Typical Interior Rooms

Typical Interior Rooms

Typical Interior Rooms


Sponsored Content:

Durable, affordable steel-frame homes for hundreds of thousands of dollars less than stick built (wood frame) housing. It’s the future of affordable value-added homes.

Stick built (wood frame) homes are expensive, take a long time to build and are the number #1 reason why over half the American public is having trouble making monthly rent and/or mortgage payments. The median to average cost of a home in the U.S. today is $313,500 to $377,700 compared to $17,200 in 1963. It is also one of the main reasons there is a record level of homelessness in this country. A large number of students who graduate from college shackled with crushing debt, are moving back into their old bedrooms back home with mom and dad. A lot of what used to be well-paying jobs have been shipped overseas leaving low paying unskilled jobs here at home. People are simply not able to make the kind of money that is needed to pay for high mortgages and sky-high rents that have a choke hold on everyone who isn’t already well off.

So what’s the solution?

The solution is to completely re-invent housing through innovation – to design homes that are “green” – that will outlast any wood frame home by at least fifty-years. Steel frame homes cost hundreds of thousands of dollars less that stand up to earthquakes, hurricanes, fire and termites. And get this – we’re talking homes that start at $39,500 and top out at around $239,400. These homes are available now at SUNSHINE Network. These are NOT cheaply built mobile or manufactured homes. These are strong, long lasting dwellings that require only a fraction of the maintenance that other kinds of housing require.

All homes come with foundation, washers and dryers, full kitchens, refrigerators, heating and air conditioning including secure over the internet apps that control indoor and outdoor lighting and heat/a-c controls. When you leave work, you can dial up the porch light, crank up the heat and have it all warm and toasty (or cool) by the time you get home.

And what’s more, our steel fabricated homes will outlast any wood frame/stick built home by many years and requires far less maintenance.

This isn’t pie in the sky. It’s here today. This technology is well known to state, city and county planning and building departments who acknowledge steel built homes meet ALL state and local building codes. And Sunshine Network will deliver a home to your homesite AT COST Plus 15%.

If you would like to learn more about this REAL LIFE ALTERNATIVE to expensive last century home construction just give William Sagona a call at 541-497-3585 or contact him by email at Bill@SunshineNetwork.US

If you would like look over the home models on our website, go to SunshineNetwork.US or just click here.

We look forward to hearing from you!

William A. Sagona
Managing Director
SUNSHINE Network, LLC
Bend Oregon USA
1-541-497-3585
Bill@sunshinenetwork.us
www.sunshinenetwork.us

 Posted by at 9:35 AM

Surviving is a good thing – Surviving well is even better

 Daily News  Comments Off on Surviving is a good thing – Surviving well is even better
Nov 272016
 

Land Life Boat 8' x 40' SunshineNetwork.US

Land Life Boat
8′ x 40′
SunshineNetwork.US

Sponsored Content
From Bill Sagona, SunshineNetwork.US
Building Earthquake Proof Shelters – Land Lifeboats

I’m writing this article to remind everyone of a very real threat that many of you already heard about. But rather than scare people we want everyone to stay calm and remain clear about what can be done to successfully deal with the looming Cascadia earthquake

The Cascadia Subduction Zone, 250 miles off the Oregon Coast, is where two of the world’s twelve continental shelves are bumping heads. These two slabs of the Earth’s surface are not slipping past each other – they’re stuck – locked together, as they have been for hundreds of years. And when that tension is released, it will trigger yet another in a long series of mega earthquakes in the 9+ richter category.

Recent scientific studies by Oregon State University and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) clearly show that this mega-fault zone breaches, on average, every 250 to 350 years. The last such earthquake occurred on January 26, 1700 which sent a tsunami clear across the Pacific Ocean and battered the Japanese coast – all recorded in Japanese historical documents.

The year 1700 to the year 2016 is 316 years which is at the outer edge of the documented intervals between these earthquakes that go well back beyond 10,000 years.

Our company, Sunshine Network, has come to grips with this real and looming threat. It has prompted us to design a brand new post-earthquake shelter we are calling the Land Life Boat or (LLB)™  And it’s very affordable. (See drawings below)

Land Life Boat 8' x 40' SunshineNetwork.US

Land Life Boat
8′ x 40′
SunshineNetwork.US

Sleeps 12 SunshineNetwork.com

Sleeps 12
SunshineNetwork.US

Floor plan SunshineNetwork.US

Floor plan
SunshineNetwork.US

Unlike average homes, stores or office buildings, the LLB™ can survive any earthquake. The LLB™ starts out as a large steel container, but when completed it has windows, two doors, a utility kitchen including a propane stove and oven, sleeping area that sleeps 12, bathroom and plenty of freeze dried food and routine medical supplies. It also has propane for cooking and heating. On top of the LLB™ are two 1,100 gallon water tanks that gravity feeds a water purification system and then to water faucets in the living area below. It also includes a high capacity compost toilet plus many more amenities. With such a large capacity to house people, entire neighborhoods can come together and group-purchase a number of these LLB’s™ as a source of REAL post-earthquake life insurance. And they are only 8’ x 40′ – something that can easily fit within many back yards. And they contain NO formaldehyde.

After the Cascade quake it may take weeks for rescue workers to organize and get to you – many months more to rebuild roads – even longer to rebuild communities. Hopefully you, your loved ones and neighbors will not need immediate emergency treatment. But you WILL will need a safe, warm and secure place with food and room to sleep before help, in any form, can arrive from the outside world. With such a large capacity to house people, entire neighborhoods can come together and group-purchase a number of these LLB’s™ as a source of REAL post-earthquake life insurance.

Sunshine Network is prepared to build these LLB’s™ in large quantities and at considerable discounts. We offer to anyone interested to acquire the LLB™ at a deeply discounted price. And we will donate 15% of remaining profits to the American Red Cross for disaster relief.

Please visit our website: SunshineNetwork.US (click here) where you can get further details on this intelligent and cost effective approach to overcoming the challenges that the Cascade earthquake poses.

Bill Sagona
Managing Director
SUNSHINE Network,
LLC
Bend Oregon USA
541-497-3585
Bill@sunshinenetwork.us

 Posted by at 9:30 AM

Weather or Not: Headin’ Home

 Daily News  Comments Off on Weather or Not: Headin’ Home
Nov 272016
 

wxon-cbSunday, Nov. 27th – Lincoln County

Summary: On the heels of a rather benign morning yesterday, the next front arrived around noon producing wind gusts in the 30s and another round of rain. Precipitation totals were between a half and three-quarters of an inch; Lincoln City recorded the most at 0.82” and also tied with Depoe Bay for the strongest wind gust, 37 mph. Thermometer readings were in the mid-50s. The rain turned to showers after dark and the breeze faded away. After midnight, it was mostly cloudy with a bit of drizzle and fog, temps in the low-40s. This morning, a few sucker holes let in some sunshine and the breeze was southeast at 5-10 mph.

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: scattered @ 900’ & 3,100’, broken @ 4,400’
Visibility: 8 miles/Wind: SSE 8 mph/Pressure: 29.73”

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 56F/45F/37mph/0.82”
Depoe Bay: 56F/42F/37mph/0.54”
Newport: 55F/43F/33mph/0.50”
Waldport: 55F/43F/26mph/0.74”
Yachats: 55F/43F/32mph/0.79”

Forecast: With lots of folks headin’ home today, the timing of the next storm system couldn’t be worse. Rainy and breezy conditions are expected to develop this afternoon along the Central Coast, in the Coast Range and Willamette Valley, but heavywxon-showers snow and very windy in the Cascade passes (see the special expanded Travel section below for details). Locally, showers this morning are projected to turn to steady rain by around lunchtime, southwest winds 15-20 mph gusting 30-35, and a high of 50-55F. Tonight, the breeze veers to northwest and picks up to 20-30 mph gusting 45 or more, rain turns back to showers and the mercury settles near 45F. Showers continue tomorrow, breezy, and highs again of 50-55F. Total precip between now and tomorrow night could exceed an inch. Outlook is for mostly cloudy Tuesday, rain Wednesday, partly sunny and mainly dry Thursday through Saturday.

wxon-twitterSPECIAL NOTE: Be sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep updated on this very active period of winter weather; you’ll get immediate notification of any advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, there’s damp pavement, fog and 35-40F in the passes; a chance of rain or showers and windy today, high temperature 45-50F. NOTE: Part of one travel lane on Highway 20 at Milepost 2.5 just east of Newport has slumped away; short delays are possible. Willamette Valley destinations are expecting showers early, rain late, breezy, the thermometer rising to 50F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for rain, possibly heavy at times, southwest winds 10-15 mph gusting 25, high of 40-45F. For the Cascades, highways have packed snow this morning, temps 25-30F; a Winter Storm Warning is in effect from 3:00pm this afternoon through 6:00pm tomorrow evening, carry chains or use traction tires, the snow level is below the passes at 3,000 feet, with snow accumulations of 1-4 inches and winds to 45 mph creating whiteout conditions today. Outlook for Thanksgiving holiday weekend travelers is wet roads and breezy tonight at the lower elevations, but 8-14 inches of snow in the Cascade highway passes, the snow level at 3,500 feet, along with winds gusting to 50 mph. NOTE: The National Weather Service suggests you use an alternate route (like I-84 through the Gorge) if you plan on heading east of the Cascades this afternoon or tonight. * Motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are light and variable this morning with choppy seas 11 feet at 12 seconds. A Gale wxon-galeWarning is in effect from this afternoon through tomorrow morning as winds rise to SW 25-30 knots gusting 40 later today and combined seas build to 12 feet at 11 seconds. Tonight, NW winds 25-30 knots gusting 40 with combined rough seas 16 feet at 11 seconds. The breeze eases a little tomorrow, becoming NW 20-25 knots gusting 30 but swells will be up around 18 feet. Outlook is for light SW winds on Tuesday, swells subsiding to 12 feet, then NW winds 15-25 knots Wednesday and Thursday with swells 12-14 feet. * Make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Rain, breezy, surf 8-10 feet (moderate).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
11/27 Sun 10:32 AM 8.71 H
11/27 Sun 05:14 PM 0.18 L
11/27 Sun 11:44 PM 7.15 H
11/28 Mon 04:59 AM 3.14 L

In Short: Rainy and windy, showers, unsettled, then some drying.

 Posted by at 8:06 AM

Boat fills with rain water and sinks in Depoe Bay harbor

 Daily News  Comments Off on Boat fills with rain water and sinks in Depoe Bay harbor
Nov 272016
 

Charter fishing boat sinks in Depoe Bay Harbor. Robert Gambino photos

Charter fishing boat sinks in Depoe Bay Harbor.
Robert Gambino photos


City workers raised the boat and removed it from the harbor.

City workers raised the boat and removed it from the harbor.

From City Councilor Robert Gambino:
The heavy rains contributed to the load of a less-than-float-worthy vessel. The boat was abandoned some time ago and the city had just gained possession.

Thanks to the hard work and coordination of many (city crews, volunteers, Joe from South Beach Scuba) she was pumped out and floated again. She will be removed from the harbor.

 Posted by at 1:45 AM

Highway 20 just east of Newport

 Daily News  Comments Off on Highway 20 just east of Newport
Nov 272016
 
Highway 20 just east of Newport.  Road slump out.  This will soon turn into a major construction area.  Expect delays. Ken Gagne photo

Highway 20 just east of Newport. Road slump out. This will soon turn into a major construction area. Expect delays.
Ken Gagne photo

 Posted by at 12:18 AM

Weather or Not: The Recession

 Daily News  Comments Off on Weather or Not: The Recession
Nov 262016
 

wxon-cbSaturday, Nov. 26th – Lincoln County

Summary: Yesterday may be best described as a recession with the breeze, rain and flooding all receding by afternoon following the wind-blown soaking we received over the early part of the Thanksgiving holiday weekend. Rainfall totals barely hit a tenth of an inch, southerly winds peaked in the upper-teens and temps were in the mid-50s. The heaviest precipitation came between 2:00pm and 4:00pm. It was mostly dry overnight with scattered clouds and ESE winds 10-15 mph. This morning, dripless high clouds covered the sky and winds were under 10 mph.

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: scattered @ 8,500’
Visibility: 10 miles/Wind: SE 5 mph/Pressure: 29.42”

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Rain…
Lincoln City: 54F/47F/0.09”
Depoe Bay: 55F/46F/0.12”
Newport: 54F/45F/0.13”
Waldport: 53F/47F/0.12”
Yachats: 55F/48F/0.13”

Forecast: More wet stuff on the way, with rain, showers and maybe some thunderstorms today, total precip up to three-quarter of an inch, west winds gusting 25 mph and a high of 50-55F. Tonight, showers continue, a moderate southwest breeze, and thewxon-showers mercury dips to 45F. Regular ol’ steady rain returns tomorrow by lunchtime and lingers through Sunday night, high about 55F. Outlook is for showers on Monday, dry and partly to mostly cloudy Tuesday, showers Wednesday and Thursday, and then another possibly dry day next Friday. The thermometer cooling a bit during the extended period as highs of 50F and lows of 40F are projected.

wxon-twitterNOTE: Be sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep updated on winter weather; you’ll get immediate notification of any advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, there’s wet pavement, showers and 40-45F in the passes; showers and breezy today, minor stream and river flooding, high temperature 45-50F. Willamette Valley destinations are expecting rain, breezy, the thermometer rising to 50F. NOTE: Look for heavier than usual weekend traffic on I-5 between Portland and Eugene today as fans converge on Reser Stadium in Corvallis for the annual OSU/UO Civil War football game. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for rain, light east winds, high of 45F. For the Cascades, highways are wet this morning, temp is right at 35F, rain and snow showers today, snow accumulations 1-3 inches, the snow level is near the passes at 4,500 feet, carry chains or use traction tires. Outlook for Thanksgiving holiday weekend travelers is wet roads at the lower elevations, but a Winter Storm Watch has been posted for snow in the Cascade highway passes, the snow level dropping to 3,000 feet tonight through tomorrow night, snow accumulations up to a foot possible. * Motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are light E nearshore this morning but blowing 15-20 knots offshore at Stonewall Bank, with seas 12 wxon-scafeet at 13 seconds. A Small Craft Advisory for winds is in effect until 2:00pm this afternoon. A Small Craft Advisory for hazardous seas is in effect through tomorrow afternoon. S winds 10-15 knots gusting 20 today, combined seas 12 feet at 12 seconds. Tonight, W winds 20-25 knots gusting 30, veering to NW after midnight, swells 11 feet at 11 seconds. SW winds return tomorrow at 15-20 knots with swells about 10 feet. Outlook is for NW winds 20-25 knots gusting 30 on Monday, SW winds 20-25 knots Tuesday, and NW again 20-25 knots Wednesday; swells 12-14 feet through the periods. * Make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Showers, breezy, surf 8-10 feet (moderate).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
11/26 Sat 09:58 AM 8.55 H
11/26 Sat 04:39 PM 0.58 L
11/26 Sat 11:02 PM 6.92 H
11/27 Sun 04:21 AM 2.95 L

In Short: Showers, moderate winds, then continued unsettled.

 Posted by at 8:10 AM