Oct 152014
 

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 Posted by at 9:52 AM
Oct 152014
 

Chris Burns Weather

Wednesday, October 15th – Lincoln County

Summary: Monday night’s storm had dissipated by mid-morning yesterday and there was a break in the heaviest rainfall until about dinnertime. Counting what fell last evening and overnight, however, the Central Coast received around an inch of precipitation; Lincoln City had the most. Regionally, Hillsboro reported record rainfall of 0.68” surpassing their old record of 0.49” set in 2009. Winds were light until about 3:00am this morning when a developing local-scale weather system pushed in with sou’westers gusting mainly into the 30s, though Yachats took a gust of 44 mph. At daybreak, it was still breezy and heavy showers punctuated the atmosphere. By the way, we drop below 11 hours of daylight today (10 hours 59 minutes), and we’re still losing about 3 minutes a day.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Wind Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 63F/54F/25mph/1.15”
Depoe Bay: 60F/53F/37mph/0.82”
Newport: 59F/52F/32mph/1.04”
Waldport: 60F/55F/30mph/0.94”
Yachats: 61F/54F/44mph/0.89”

Forecast: Pluviophiles (rain lovers) should be rejoicing in light of the current predictions as we look for another half inch or so of precipitation today and more on the way. Brief sunbreaks and thunderstorms are also possible due to cool and unstable air. Southwest winds are expected to stay up around 20-25 mph gusting to 30-35, and the high temp this afternoon tops out near 60F. Tonight, a diminishing chance of showers and wind, and tomorrow could be nearly dry (pluviophiles, pout here). Lows overnight of 50-55F, highs on Thursday 60-65F. Outlook is for a rain fan’s feast on Friday and Saturday as another wet and windy storm assaults our area. Sunday may be a grimace period for our pluviophile friends with only a slight chance of showers, but next week it appears the weather will return smiles to their faces as rain returns.

Travel: In the Coast Range today, windy, rain showers and 55-60F. Valley destinations are expecting showers and breezy conditions with highs near 60F. For the Cascades, showers, windy; the snow level is down to 5,500 feet but should remain slightly above the Cascade highway passes.

Marine: Steep seas, 13 feet at 12 seconds, and SW winds 15-20 knots gusting 30 are creating rough conditions this morning. As of 8:00am, Depoe Bay bar is closed to recreational vessels 40 feet and less, and to uninspected passenger vessels 30 feet and less. Yaquina Bay bar is closed to recreational vessels 40 feet and less, and to uninspected passenger vessels 36 feet and less. A Small Craft Advisory for winds is in effect through late tonight. A Small Craft Advisory for seas is in place until tomorrow morning. SW winds today 20-25 knots with gusts to 35 before noon, seas 12 feet with 6 foot windwaves. The breeze and seas stay up tonight with southerlies 20-25 knots and combined seas 14 feet at 14 seconds, subsiding after midnight to 12 feet. Tomorrow, expect S winds 20-25 knots rising to 25-30 knots gusting 35 in the afternoon with combined slab-sided seas 12 feet at 12 seconds. Outlook is for a gale on Friday as S winds increase to 30-35 knots gusting to 45 and combined rough seas build to 17 feet. On Saturday, southerlies 10-15 knots, seas 10 feet, but another front arrives Sunday packing 25-30 knots of S wind and combined seas of 14 feet.

On the Beach… Showers, breezy, surf 11-12 feet (high).
* Surf may build to dangerous levels by the weekend.
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
10/15 Wed 12:20 PM 3.71 L
10/15 Wed 06:02 PM 6.82 H
10/16 Thu 01:04 AM 1.07 L
10/16 Thu 08:08 AM 6.54 H

In Short: Showers, windy, brief drying, then wet and breezy.

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 Posted by at 8:09 AM
Oct 152014
 

'Vette leaves Hwy 34 at around MP 3.

‘Vette leaves Hwy 34 at around MP 3.

Driver suffered neck and head pain.

Driver suffered neck and head pain.
Adam Bailey photos

A Corvette headed eastbound on Highway 34 Tuesday morning got away from its driver, left the pavement and careened off onto the shoulder and into a tree. The driver was found still sitting in the ‘Vette, talking on his cellphone. A witness said he was complaining of neck and head pain. Otherwise he didn’t seem seriously injured.

No word on what caused the crash.

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 Posted by at 12:25 AM
Oct 152014
 

Spouting Horn Depoe Bay Greg Henton photo

Spouting Horn
Depoe Bay
Greg Henton photo


Bayshore Surf Kerry Terrel

Bayshore Surf
Kerry Terrel


Synchronized Flying Kerry Terrel

Synchronized Flying
Kerry Terrel

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 Posted by at 12:11 AM
Oct 142014
 
Cowabunga Longboard Classic, Otter Rock, 1983. Photo by Scott Blackman

Cowabunga Longboard Classic, Otter Rock, 1983. Photo by Scott Blackman

An engaging and nostalgic exhibit on Oregon Coast surfing, surfer culture, and the pioneers who made it happen opens at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center on Thursday, October 23rd. 

For centuries, surfing was central to ancient Polynesian culture. It was “discovered” by European explorers in the late 1700s. The first written account of surfing in Hawaii appears in the journals of Captain James Cook. Cook describes with envy the pleasure experienced by these early surfer dudes, December 1777. 

Locally, surfing (probably body surfing on what looks like wood ironing boards) got a false start in the early 1910s at Newport’s Agate Beach. As far as anyone knows it went into hibernation with the outbreak of World War I, 1914.

The era of modern surfing began locally in 1964 when Scott Blackman went to Sears in Salem, bought a board, and caught his first wave at Agate Beach. Immediately he was hooked.  Blackman, who is known nationally for his photography, was not only the area’s first modern surfer and mentor to the era’s young surfers, he used his camera to artfully document local surfers and surfing culture.

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Scott and his wife, Sandy, recently wrote a book, Oregon Surfing, Central Coast and the two of them made this exhibit possible. This exhibit features many Blackman photos of the area’s pioneer surfers, including members of the legendary Agate Beach Surf Club. Also featured is surfing memorabilia from the community and items the Blackmans discovered in the course of their book research.

More than just a photo exhibit, Making Waves includes early surfing posters and several 1960s vintage surfboards, most of which were loaned by Mike Jipp, Pacific Northwest Surf Museum and Lincoln City Surf Shop. These rare old school boards were made by Oregon board makers such as Jensen, Tillamook Head, and Jim Sagawa. Most are long boards, one of which dates from 1946 and is 12’ long. 

An opening reception for the Making Waves exhibit will be held at the Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center on Friday, October 24th at 5:00 pm. Admission to this event is free for members, and $5.00 for non-members. For more information, call 541-265-7509.

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 Posted by at 9:15 PM
Oct 142014
 
Courtesy photo

Courtesy photo

LINCOLN CITY – How many mandolins does it take to wow an audience on the Oregon Coast? What is a mandola? We’ll find out on Sunday, Nov. 2, when the Grammy-nominated Modern Mandolin Quartet plays in Lincoln City, on the Lincoln City Cultural Center auditorium stage. The show begins at 7 pm, and advance tickets are just $18.

The Modern Mandolin Quartet is a chamber group using the instruments of the mandolin family (two mandolins, mandola and mando-cello) to perform classical and contemporary compositions from around the world.
.
Originally created just for the performers’ personal enjoyment, the MMQ rapidly achieved success with four albums of Windham Hill Records and concert tours throughout the United States and Europe. Two additional albums followed on independent labels.

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Now, the quartet has returned with a vengeance, with the release of “Americana,” a collection of American music on the label Sono Luminus, which last year was nominated for three Grammy Awards: Best Chamber Music/Small Ensemble Performance, Best Engineered Classical Album, and Classical Producer of the Year. On this West Coast tour, the Modern Mandolin Quartet consists of co-founder Dana Rath, along with Matt Flinner, Paul Binkley and Adam Roszkiewicz.

Tickets to this Oregon Coast premiere on Sunday, Nov. 2, are $18 in advance, on sale now at lincolncity-culturalcenter.com (click “Buy Tickets Online” on the left hand side). Or, they can be purchased at the LCCC Info Center from 10 am to 4 pm Wednesday-Monday, and 45 minutes before show time at the east entrance of the LCCC. The box office accepts VISA, Mastercard and American Express, as well as checks and cash. For details and tickets, call 541-994-9994.

Doors will open at 6:30 pm. A selection of Northwest beers and wines, My Petite Sweet cookies and bars, and Mountain Man savory snacks will be sold before the show, and during intermission. Tickets sold at the door will be $20.

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 Posted by at 4:51 PM
Oct 142014
 

depoe bay fire district banner

Admiral Paul F. Zukunft Commandant
Unites States Coast Guard
2100 2nd St. SW
Washington DC 20593-7000

Dear Admiral Zukunft:,

Please reverse your decision to close the USCG Air Station Newport, Oregon. There must be another way for the USCG to save money without placing lives in danger. The closure of this Air Station will increase response time on the central Oregon coast from approximately 15 minutes to 60 minutes or more. In my line of work, we do what we can to reduce response times, not increase them.

I am not a polished politician, I am not a metropolitan Fire Chief, I am not used to writing letters to Congressmen, State Representatives and especially the Admiral of the United States Coast Guard, but this is a cause worth fighting for. The people of this Fire District and this part of the Oregon coast need the assets of the USCG.

The Depoe Bay Fire District serves a small coastal town which caters to tourists. We are protected by volunteer firefighters supplemented by a small career staff. We fight fires, respond to medical calls, car accidents, and often to homes where people just may need some companionship. We are not equipped for, nor are we trained for, water rescue. We rely on the USCG for that and they do a fantastic job.

We were notified on October 2, 2014 that the Air Station in Newport, Oregon would be closed effective November 30, 2014. Now fast forward to a little over a week later, October 11, 2014. My fire district was dispatched to a report of eight people stuck on the rocks just North of Depoe Bay, Oregon.

As it turns out, there were six people on the rocks when the fire district arrived. Several of the individuals decided to jump into the water and struggled to swim to shore. Luckily they made it. Unfortunately, one young victim was pulled from the surf unconscious, to be given rescue breaths by a caring bystander.

This is where your decision impacts the rubber meeting the proverbial “road”. Upon dispatch, I immediately requested assets in the form of a USCG helicopter. I did this first because I know my area and these people were in serious danger – incoming tide, 15-foot waves and very cold water. Secondly, I know that time is of the essence, and visitors to the coast are not often prepared for the dangerous surf condition we often experience and hypothermia is a likely possibility.

We arrived to find six individuals trapped by an incoming tide and large waves. One young man decided to jump into the ocean rather than wait for rescue. He was lucky. Had the current swept him out, there were 18-foot breakers waiting to greet him with the power of destruction that would have been no match for a human body. Our Assistant Chief led the operation, dealing with the victims who were pulled from the surf, as our firefighters assessed the victims on the rocks. Luckily, I had requested a USCG Helicopter, and luckily they were in Newport.

Within ten to fifteen minutes of my arrival, the USCG was saving these people from an uncertain future. They were scared, and could not climb any higher on the rocks. We were thirty minutes from a full tide with 18-foot breakers. This was a dangerous situation and one we face often. I believe the outcome would have been very different if the response time was one hour, versus fifteen minutes.

Years ago the Newport Fisherman’s wives worked hard to get the helicopter here because they understood the need. They will work just as hard or harder to keep it here now. The impact on us will be significant; it will often be painful, and it will be felt often.

There has been a lot of emphasis on saving the mariner, and the USCG insistence that emergency locator beacons make it easier to find vessels in distress. It was stated that the helicopters are faster, and the National standard of two hours will still be met. With all due respect, those arguments do not hold water when it comes to the tourist or resident at the Central Oregon Coast. One hour in our water could mean death. Our water is too cold and too rough for the surfer in distress or the summer time visitor who does not know our ocean, or the people climbing rocks during high tide.

Please do not remove the USCG Helicopter and the fine men and women who make these rescues possible. We hold the United States Coast Guard in the highest regard. We respect what you and your men and women do on a daily basis, but we cannot support this move. As of this past Saturday, you can bet there are five grateful citizens who would agree.

Sincerely,
Joshua L. Williams
Fire Chief
Depoe Bay Fire District

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 Posted by at 4:22 PM
Oct 142014
 

family clothing swap lcsd

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 Posted by at 3:38 PM
Oct 142014
 
Oregon Coast Community College Campus, Newport

Oregon Coast Community College Campus, Newport

From Dave Price, OCCC

Thinking about college? Whether you are planning to attend college or simply evaluating your options, you can get answers to your questions about college admissions, the financial-aid process and scholarships at “College Nights,” coming Tuesday, Nov. 4 to the Newport campus of Oregon Coast Community College.

The event kicks off at 6 p.m. and features free pizza and beverages, as well as college-planning tips and even a chance to win a $500 scholarship.

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“We’re excited to host this event for a second year and to welcome possible college students of all ages and backgrounds to this event,” said Kimberly Jones, with OCCC Student Services. “Whether you’re exploring the possibility of attending Oregon Coast Community College, or any other college or university, ‘College Nights’ is the place to get your most important questions answered.”

Visit www.CollegeNights.org or www.OregonCoastcc.org for more information, or call 541-867-8503.

The College Nights event will be held Nov. 4, 6pm, at the Newport OCCC Campus, located at 400 SE College Way. To reach College Way, simply head east on SE 40th off Hwy. 101, about one mile south of the Yaquina Bay Bridge. Turn left at the big forever unfinished boat on the corner and head up the hill.

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 Posted by at 3:37 PM
Oct 142014
 
Serena Profitt, 4 of Otis died of E coli infection September 9th

Serena Profitt, 4 of Otis
died of E coli infection September 9th

According to Serena Profitt’s mother, she’s been told by health officials that it may have been feces droppings from the family’s pet goat that produced the E coli that ravaged her daughter’s body for over a week before she finally succumbed at a hospital in Portland. But the investigation is still not complete according to state and Lincoln County health officials.

The continuing story is in The Oregonian. Click here.

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 Posted by at 3:19 PM