Anyone want to interview the Port of Newport’s candidates for General Manager?

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Jan 172018
 

Yaquina Bay – Port of Newport
Archive photo

COMMUNITY MEMBERS WANTED

The Port of Newport is looking for community volunteers to serve on a panel to interview finalists for the General Manager position. This will be a one, or possibly two day event. If you are interested, please submit your name for consideration to rstellner@portofnewport.com.

A date for the event has not yet been finalized, but is anticipated to take place mid to late February. If there are days in February when you would not be available, please provide that information in your email. Thank you.

Port of Newport

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Oregon adds nearly 15,000 jobs in December – Unemployment rate unchanged

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Jan 172018
 


Oregon Adds 14,700 Jobs in December – Oregon Employment Department

In December, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment grew by 14,700 jobs, following a revised loss of 300 jobs in November. Monthly gains were concentrated in two industries that bounced back from weaker hiring patterns in the summer, as leisure and hospitality added 4,400 jobs in December and professional and business services added 3,000. Three other industries added at least 1,000 jobs in December: manufacturing (+2,400 jobs), construction (+1,600), and health care and social assistance (+1,000). No major industry cut jobs substantially in December.

Since December 2016, total nonfarm payroll employment grew by 48,400 jobs, or 2.6 percent. This is near the rate of growth experienced throughout 2016 and well into mid-2017. While the jobs reports in late 2017, which covered the August through November data, were indicating a slowdown in Oregon’s economic expansion, the strong jobs reading in December reflects a return to robust growth.

Over the most recent 12 months, gains were most rapid in construction, which added 8,800 jobs, or 9.4 percent. Next in line was leisure and hospitality (+8,900 jobs, or 4.4%), followed closely by private educational services (+1,400 jobs, or 4.0%). Several major industries expanded by close to 3 percent: health care and social assistance (+7,200 jobs, or 3.1%), financial activities (+2,900 jobs, or 3.0%), and professional and business services (+6,600 jobs, or 2.8%). Meanwhile, only two industries changed employment over the year by less than 1 percent: government (+2,300 jobs, or 0.7%) and wholesale trade (-200 jobs, or -0.3%).

Oregon’s unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 4.1 percent in December from 4.2 percent in November. Oregon’s unemployment rate was the same as the U.S. unemployment rate, which was also 4.1 percent in December. The state’s annual average unemployment rate for 2017 was 4.0 percent, which was Oregon’s lowest annual average unemployment rate since comparable records began in 1976. Oregon’s second-lowest annual average unemployment rate was 4.9 percent, which was reached in 2016 and 1995.

Oregon Adds nearly 15,000 jobs during December – Jobless rate unchanged

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Jan 172018
 

Oregon Adds 14,700 Jobs in December – Oregon Employment Department

In December, Oregon’s nonfarm payroll employment grew by 14,700 jobs, following a revised loss of 300 jobs in November. Monthly gains were concentrated in two industries that bounced back from weaker hiring patterns in the summer, as leisure and hospitality added 4,400 jobs in December and professional and business services added 3,000. Three other industries added at least 1,000 jobs in December: manufacturing (+2,400 jobs), construction (+1,600), and health care and social assistance (+1,000). No major industry cut jobs substantially in December.

Since December 2016, total nonfarm payroll employment grew by 48,400 jobs, or 2.6 percent. This is near the rate of growth experienced throughout 2016 and well into mid-2017. While the jobs reports in late 2017, which covered the August through November data, were indicating a slowdown in Oregon’s economic expansion, the strong jobs reading in December reflects a return to robust growth.

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Over the most recent 12 months, gains were most rapid in construction, which added 8,800 jobs, or 9.4 percent. Next in line was leisure and hospitality (+8,900 jobs, or 4.4%), followed closely by private educational services (+1,400 jobs, or 4.0%). Several major industries expanded by close to 3 percent: health care and social assistance (+7,200 jobs, or 3.1%), financial activities (+2,900 jobs, or 3.0%), and professional and business services (+6,600 jobs, or 2.8%). Meanwhile, only two industries changed employment over the year by less than 1 percent: government (+2,300 jobs, or 0.7%) and wholesale trade (-200 jobs, or -0.3%).

Oregon’s unemployment rate was essentially unchanged at 4.1 percent in December from 4.2 percent in November. Oregon’s unemployment rate was the same as the U.S. unemployment rate, which was also 4.1 percent in December. The state’s annual average unemployment rate for 2017 was 4.0 percent, which was Oregon’s lowest annual average unemployment rate since comparable records began in 1976. Oregon’s second-lowest annual average unemployment rate was 4.9 percent, which was reached in 2016 and 1995.

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Weather or Not: Significant Surf/Beach Erosion

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Jan 172018
 

Wednesday, Jan. 17th – Lincoln County

Summary: Mostly cloudy, a few sunbreaks yesterday; mixed skies overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 56F/48F/16mph/0.02”
Depoe Bay: 56F/47F/22mph/0.01”
Newport: 55F/45F/17mph/~0.01”
Waldport: 61F/50F/24mph/0.01”
Yachats: 59F/50F/23mph/~0.01”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: unlimited
Visibility: 10 miles/Wind: SE 6 mph/Altimeter: 29.97”

The Coastal Flood Warning issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Coast remains in effect from midnight tonight until midnight Thursday. A 27-32 foot swell train will reach the coast late tonight and peak around mid-day Thursday close to high tide (9.5-10.5 feet between noon and 2:00pm). This event appears to be similar to, or slightly stronger, than the December 2015 event where waves ran much higher on the beaches and impacted numerous low-lying structures adjacent to beaches and harbors. The unusually large westerly swell, with a dominant period of 17-19 seconds, will also create immense sneakers waves.

* Breaking waves of 35-45 feet running parallel to the coastline will send water much farther up beaches and jetties than normal. Structures and roads located immediately at beach level will potentially be flooded or impacted by debris. Many cove access beaches, jetties, and rocky outcroppings will be covered by deep water.

* Higher than normal tides and large seas will likely result in beach erosion and some flooding of low-lying locations along the coast tonight and tomorrow.

* Tidal overflow flooding of inland areas is possible but low river flows may limit impacts.

* A Coastal Flood Warning means that flooding is occurring or imminent. Coastal residents in the warned area should be alert for rising water, and take appropriate action to protect life and property. Visitors should remain off beaches and avoid narrow access areas where escape routes could be cut off by rising water.

Forecast: In addition to a wild and wooly ocean, we’re expecting some serious rainfall and strong winds ashore, too. Rain today, up to half an inch, south winds gusting to 50 mph and a high of 55-60F. The rain continues tonight, another half inch or better, sou’westers 20-30 mph gusting 45, and a low in the upper-40s. Tomorrow, showers and possible thunderstorms, an easing breeze and cooler, high about 50F. Outlook is for showers Thursday and Friday, rainy and breezy over the weekend, showers Monday, then a chance of rain Tuesday. The thermometer is projected to be in the normal range all week with highs in the upper-40s and lows in the low 40s.

wxon-twitterThroughout the stormy season, use Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to get updated regional travel info and immediate notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings affecting the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temps 40-45F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 40-45F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 45-50F, east winds gusting 35-40 mph. For the Cascades, highways are bare, 35-40F, the free air freezing level is at 8,000 feet. * Get up-to-the-minute Northwest highway weather at Real-Time Roads. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck for the latest traffic conditions including delays and hazards.

Marine: Winds are ESE 5-10 knots nearshore this morning but blowing 20-25 knots gusting 30 at Stonewall Bank with rough seas 11-12 feet at 12 seconds. A Storm Warning is in effect from 10:00am this morning through this evening. A strong cold front crosses Central Coast waters late today, which will result in storm force wind gusts of 45-50 knots this afternoon through this evening. The strong low will also generate very high seas 30-35 feet late tonight through Thursday. The active pattern continues into the weekend with combined seas in the upper-teens to lower-20s through at least Sunday morning. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Rain, strong winds, surf 10-15 feet (moderate).
* NOTE: Surf will be building to extreme proportions tonight and tomorrow (see Coastal Flood Warning above).
* Tides
01/17 Wed 11:51 AM 8.98 H
01/17 Wed 6:49 PM -0.38 L
01/18 Thu 1:34 AM 7.42 H
01/18 Thu 6:37 AM 3.61 L

In Short: Rainy and windy, showers and breezy, then more steady rain.

An Effort to Better Manage Vacation Rentals in Newport Suffers Substantial Hiccup at City Council Meeting

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Jan 172018
 

Many Nye Beach neighbors feel that the city planning commission stacked the deck on the city’s new VRD review committee.


Some time back the Newport City Council, reacting to growing neighborhood unrest with the growth of vacation rentals in various areas, decided to ask the city planning commission take the bull by the horns and begin to study and fix the problem – find some workable and livable compromise.

But when the planning commission selected their new members on the remediation committee, some Nye Beach neighbors especially, accused the commission of appointing what could easily be described as appointing foxes to guard the hen house. Neighbors claimed that the planning commission selected a combination of vacation rental owners, real estate agents, along with lawyers which greatly outnumbered three residents who told the council Tuesday night that their interests were cast aside. Some of those neighbors pointed out that some of the newly appointed committee members don’t even live in Newport.

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The city council was quite taken aback by this revelation and wondered aloud how this situation evolved, especially in light of their understanding that the guidelines they gave the planning commission was to select a VRD advisory committee that would reverse some of the problems posed by VRDs – like noise, trash and parking problems, not to mention the loss of integrity and feel of a real neighborhood that they sorely miss.

Planning Director Derrick Tokos rushed in to defend the planning commission pointing out that the council had indicated they wanted balance in terms of VRD owners and residents as well as trying to mitigate typical neighbor-VRD complaints. He said the planning commission thought they were fulfilling the desires of the city council.

It didn’t take the city council long to hone in on what they sensed was a misunderstanding between what the council wanted and who the planning commission selected to be on the VRD committee.

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In the end, the council went in to damage control-mode and, in fact, “strongly urged” the planning commission to expand the number of members on the VRD Advisory Committee. Right now there’s 11. The council suggested maybe three or four more, hinting strongly that the planning commission appoint candidates who are not VRD owners, realtors, lawyers and the like. They indicated regular citizens, perhaps living in VRD affected neighborhoods like Nye Beach, should be given a good chance of being selected and thereby heard by the whole community.

The planning commission will take up the issue again next Monday night, 7pm at Newport City Hall.

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The “HerStory” of Wild Women!

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Jan 162018
 


River Gallery
184 S. Main
Independence, OR


Visit River Gallery during our Wild Women 2018 Exhibit. You can view various artist’s interpretations of this show’s theme, “HerStory”. Celebrate the spirit of womanhood at the River Gallery in Independence, OR!

Join us for the reception – Saturday, January 27th, 2018 from 6-9PM. There will be food, beverages, music and you can meet the artists! Everyone is welcome!

Another bold creation by Karen Fitzgibbon. A free form crocheted figure standing astride a free form crocheted crow. Titled ‘Balancing Act’ as that’s what life is basically about, balancing all that we do.

For more info Click Here!

Weather or Not: Keep Your Raingear Handy

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Jan 162018
 

Tuesday, Jan. 16th – Lincoln County

Summary: Mainly cloudy yesterday; rain and breezy evening and overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 61F/49F/22mph/0.28”
Depoe Bay: 63F/47F/27mph/0.23”
Newport: 59F/46F/30mph/0.51”
Waldport: 61F/49F/29mph/0.29”
Yachats: 60F/49F/35mph/0.39”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: scattered @ 3,600’
Visibility: 7 miles/Wind: S 7 mph/Altimeter: 30.19”

Forecast: Except for a few short breaks, we’re in for a wet week. Mixed skies with a chance of showers today, southerly winds gusting 25 mph and highs of 50-55F. A slight chance of rain tonight, low 45-50F. Rainy and breezy tomorrow, top temp near 60F. Outlook is for stormy conditions tomorrow night with sou’westers gusting to 50 mph and up to three quarters of an inch of rain, showers Thursday and Friday, rain Saturday and Sunday, showers on Monday. The mercury should hang around seasonal levels as highs come in about 50F and lows dip into the low-40s.

wxon-twitterThroughout the stormy season, use Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to get updated regional travel info and immediate notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings affecting the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are wet, temps 40-45F. Willamette Valley roads are wet, thermometer readings 45-50F. The Columbia River Gorge has mixed wet/dry pavement, temperatures 40-45F, light southeast winds. For the Cascades, highways have spots of ice, 30-35F, the snow level is at 4,500 feet, carry chains or traction tires. * Get up-to-the-minute Northwest highway weather at Real-Time Roads. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck for the latest traffic conditions including delays and hazards.

Marine: Winds are S 10-20 knots gusting 25 this morning with rough seas 12 feet at 13 seconds. A Small Craft Advisory is in effect through late tonight. A Gale Warning is in effect from late tonight through Thursday morning. A relative break in the winds today. A surface low moves north along 145W tomorrow to near Haida Gwaii by midnight. It will send a strong cold front across the area tomorrow likely producing strong gales into Thursday, with possible storm force winds mainly beyond 20 miles from shore Wednesday afternoon. The strong low will also generate very high seas around 30 feet late Wednesday night through Thursday. The active pattern continues with combined seas in the upper-teens to lower-20s through the weekend. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Showers, breezy, surf 8-12 feet (moderate).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
01/16 Tue 11:15 AM 9.02 H
01/16 Tue 6:16 PM -0.34 L
01/17 Wed 1:02 AM 7.30 H
01/17 Wed 5:59 AM 3.70 L

In Short: Showers, breezy, then wet and windy.