Little doggie found in Newport

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Jul 282017
 

Little pooch found by Newport resident and will deliver it to the Lincoln County Animal Shelter after 10am.

Found this sweet little doggie at 9 am on the street at NE Avery and NE 7th street Newport.

Will turn into Lincoln County Animal Shelter (510 NE Harney) today after 10am. She’s blonde, about 12 lbs.

Animal Shelter is the red pointer.

Shelter just east of the Lincoln County Fairgrounds.

Weather or Not: A Well-Oiled Machine

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Jul 282017
 

Friday, July 28th – Lincoln County

Summary: Morning clouds, afternoon sun yesterday; clear, calm overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 66F/54F/20mph/0.00”
Depoe Bay: 62F/49F/23mph/0.00”
Newport: 63F/45F/24mph/0.00”
Waldport: 62F/50F/16mph/0.00”
Yachats: 63F/52F/19mph/0.00”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: unlimited
Visibility: 7 miles/Wind: NNW 5 mph/Altimeter: 30.16”

Forecast: The atmosphere is humming along like a well-oiled machine and isn’t expected to break down for quite a while. Look for patchy night and morning fog, afternoon sunshine and sea breezes, and temperatures near normal through next week with highs of 60-65F and lows of 50-55F.

Eclipse Viewing… While a precise forecast is well beyond the range of current projections, a look at historical records can provide some insight into the chances of a clear sky on the morning of August 21st. Considering fog, marine low clouds and the possibility of storms, we can expect about a 60% chance that the sky will be obscured. The National Weather Service has a website with additional information about the Eclipse here.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temps 50-55F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 55-60F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 60-70F. For the Cascades, highways are dry, 50-55F, the free air freezing level is 14,000 feet.

* Outlook for weekend travelers is dry roads at all elevations including the Coast Range and Cascades through Sunday night.

* An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are N 5-10 knots this morning with seas 4 feet at 8 seconds. High pressure will remain offshore, keeping winds generally out of the north through the weekend and into early next week. Strongest winds in general will be from the late afternoon through the evening hours each day, and strongest over the waters off the Central Coast as opposed to areas farther north. An area of low pressure over northern California will strengthen this weekend, resulting in stronger winds gusting into the 20-25 knot range. Seas will remain dominated by windwaves and fresh swell resulting in short periods through the weekend and into next week, but wave heights will remain 6 feet or less. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Sunshine, breezy, surf 2-3 feet (low).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
07/28 Fri 10:36 AM 0.17 L
07/28 Fri 5:16 PM 7.69 H
07/28 Fri 11:22 PM 1.68 L
07/29 Sat 05:18 AM 6.35 H

In Short: Cloudy/foggy nights and mornings, clearing/windy afternoons and evenings.

Senator Jeff Merkley: “Latest repeal bill is dead – as it ought to be…”

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Jul 282017
 

Merkley Statement on Health Bill Failure

WASHINGTON, D.C. – Oregon’s Senator Jeff Merkley released the following statement after Senate Republicans held a failed vote on their health care repeal bill:

“Thanks to the steadfast advocacy of millions of Americans and the political courage of a few Republican Senators, the latest repeal bill is dead, as it ought to be. The process that produced it is an embarrassment to the United States Senate. Worse, it shared the same fundamental problem as the previous plans: No matter which way you slice it, millions of Americans would lose health care. That’s unacceptable and indefensible.

“I have profound respect for the three Republican Senators who joined us in protecting health care for the American people— Senators McCain, Murkowski, and Collins.

“Democrats and Republicans should now come together to look for ways to improve our existing health care system— to improve the options available to all Americans, to lower prescription drug prices, and to continue reducing the number of people lacking insurance.

“Ultimately, today’s victory is a testament to the incredible work of millions of Americans who rallied at the grassroots level to save health care for their families and their communities. They took action fearlessly—from telling their most personal stories to lawmakers, to staging rallies and sit-ins across the country—and this victory is their victory.”

Lost Turtle….Is it yours?

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Jul 272017
 

A turtle obviously wandered away from home! Is it yours?


Ken Gagne says: I was at my OSP meeting on E. 73rd in Newport and one of of the guys found this turtle walking alongside the sidewalk. I took him to the Oregon Coast Aquarium but they only take sea turtles. So now I have this turtle and I’m assuming he might be somebody’s pet. He’s about 4 inches wide and about 5 or 6 inches long. Could you put it out there and see if we can find the kid it might belong too.

Call Ken Gagne at 541-961-3766

ODOT update on Highway 20 improvements near Eddyville

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Jul 272017
 

West end curve being worked on….
ODOT photo

West End Curve
Paving is scheduled to begin the week of August 7. Final paving and moving traffic on to the new road will occur sometime in September. Work is being done 6 days a week, Monday – Saturday, 12 hours per day, during the day. This could change if there are weather or other delays.

Blasting is complete.

Expect occasional flagging and minor delays, but most work is being done off of the current roadway.

Work is scheduled to be completed by September 22, 2017 (except for seeding, planting, and punch list).

The west end curve is the last half mile of roadway to be built for the U.S. 20 Pioneer Mountain – Eddyville Project and is scheduled to be completed in September. The curve in the existing roadway is being straightened by moving the roadway away from the river.

The main portion of the project, a 5 mile new alignment, opened on October 11, 2016. This new roadway replaces a ten mile segment of the original 1917-built U.S. 20 that has narrow lanes and sharp curves. The original roadway is now called Crystal Creek Loop and can be accessed at Eddyville and near the west end curve.

Clem Rd. – Philomath Paving Project (milepost 33.35 – 49.87) Work is taking place Sunday through Thursday nights from 7 p.m. to 6 a.m.

Grinding and paving work is scheduled to begin July 30. Paving will continue until sometime in September. The roadway will then be striped.

Bridge membrane work and approach reconstruction on multiple bridges throughout the summer. One lane closed 24-hours a day for this work. Automated Flagging Device being used for these lane closures with very short delays.

Newport: Storm sewer repairs force closures at NE 7th and Avery.

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Jul 272017
 

Newport Public Works advises storm sewer repair work will close the intersection of NE 7th and Avery on July 28th, July 31st, and Aug. 1st from about 7 AM till 5 PM on those dates.

Please plan your travel route accordingly.

Newport: T-Bone accident at NW 25th and 101

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Jul 272017
 

11am
Report of a T-Bone type accident on Highway 101 at NW 25th in Newport. (2415 No. Coast Hwy) No injuries. Southbound lane is reported to be blocked and engine fluids are leaking on to the pavement.

The Health-Wealth Connection – by Duane Silberman, Financial Advisor

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Jul 272017
 

Click here for Details


Duane J. Silbernagel
Financial Advisor
Waddell & Reed

The Health-Wealth Connection
Provided By: Duane J. Silbernagel CFP®

It’s a vicious cycle: Money is one of the greatest causes of stress, prolonged stress can lead to serious health issues, and health issues often result in yet more financial struggles.¹ The clear connection between health and wealth is why it’s so important to develop and maintain lifelong plans to manage both.

The big picture

Consider the following statistics:
1. More than 20% of Americans say they have either considered skipping or skipped going to the doctor due to financial worries. (American Psychological Association, 2015)

2. More than half of retirees who retired earlier than planned did so because of their own health issues or to care for a family member. (Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2017)

3. Chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arthritis are among the most common, costly, and preventable of all health problems. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2017)

4. Chronic conditions make you more likely to need long-term care, which can cost anywhere from $21 per hour for a home health aide to more than $6,000 a month for a nursing home. (Department of Health and Human Services, 2017)

5. A 65-year-old married couple on Medicare with median prescription drug costs would need about $265,000 to have a 90% chance of covering their medical expenses in retirement. (Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2017)

Develop a plan for long-term health …

The recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle are fairly straightforward: eat right, exercise regularly, don’t smoke or engage in other risky behaviors, limit soda and alcohol consumption, get enough sleep (at least seven hours for most adults), and manage stress. And before embarking on any new health-related endeavor, talk to your doctor, especially if you haven’t received a physical exam within the past year. Your doctor will benchmark important information such as your current weight and risk factors for developing chronic disease. Come to the appointment prepared to share your family’s medical history, be honest about your daily habits, and set goals with your doctor.

Other specific tips from the Department of Health and Human Services include:

Nutrition: Current nutritional guidelines call for eating a variety of vegetables and whole fruits; whole grains; low-fat dairy; a wide variety of protein sources including lean meats, fish, eggs, legumes, and nuts; and healthy oils. Some medical professionals are hailing the long-term benefits of the so-called “Mediterranean diet.” Details for a basic healthy diet and the Mediterranean diet can be found at health.gov/dietaryguidelines.

Exercise: Any physical activity is better than none. Inactive adults can achieve some health benefits from as little as 60 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week. However, the ideal target is at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of high-intensity workouts per week. For more information, visit health.gov/paguidelines.

… and long-term wealth

The recommendations for living a financially healthy life aren’t quite as straightforward because they depend so much on your individual circumstances. But there are a few basic principles to ponder:
Emergency savings: The amount you need can vary depending on whether you’re single or married, self-employed or work for an organization (and if that organization is a risky startup or an established entity). Typical recommendations range from three months’ to a year’s worth of expenses.

Retirement savings: Personal finance commentator Jean Chatzky advocates striving to save 15% of your income toward retirement, including any employer contributions. If this seems like a lofty goal, bear in mind that as with exercise, any activity is better than none — setting aside even a few dollars per pay period can lead to good financial habits. Consider starting small and then increasing your contributions as your financial circumstances improve.

Insurance: Make sure you have adequate amounts of health and disability income insurance, and life insurance if others depend on your income. You might also consider long-term care coverage.²

Health savings accounts: These tax-advantaged accounts are designed to help those with high deductible health plans set aside money specifically for medical expenses. If you have access to an HSA at work, consider the potential benefits of using it to help save for health expenses.

¹ American Psychological Association, February 4, 2015; The Telomere Effect: A Revolutionary Approach to Living Younger, Healthier, Longer, by Blackburn and Epel; and Ageproof: Living Longer Without Running Out of Money or Breaking a Hip, by Chatzky and Roizen
² The cost and availability of life insurance depend on factors such as age, health, and the type and amount of insurance purchased. A complete statement of coverage, including exclusions, exceptions, and limitations, is found only in the policy. It should be noted that long-term care carriers have the discretion to raise their rates and remove their products from the marketplace.

I hope you found this beneficial and informational. For more information about me and my services, visit my website:
www.duane.wrfa.com
Thank you for your interest. Continue reading »

Shipping/Timber industry reacts to Newport’s fishing fleet laying it on the line…

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Jul 272017
 

International Terminal lined with fishing vessels for maintenance and gear change…
Fishermen’s Wives photo

Submitted by: Heather Munro Mann on behalf of the commercial fishing industry including: Seafood Processors, 18 support businesses

Port of Newport’s Commercial Fishing Industry Platform Regarding International Terminal Access

The Port of Newport is home to a diversified commercial fishing industry. Well over 100 commercial fishing vessels are home-ported in Newport and many more transient vessels visit and utilize the Port’s facilities. Newport-based vessels participate in many fisheries and Newport is also home to many of Oregon’s Distant Water Fleet.

Many Lincoln County citizens are directly employed as vessel crew or in seafood processing plants. Hundreds more are employed by the dozens of support businesses that service the commercial fishing industry. Newport’s successful tourism economy is also based, in part, on the existence of an authentic working waterfront. In 2015 over 67.8 million pounds of seafood worth over $33.4 million in ex-vessel revenue was landed in Newport. These numbers are conservative and do not include the revenue from landings by Newport vessels in other west coast ports or the distant water fisheries. Over the last decade commercial fisheries have been steadily increasing and the opportunities for fishing continue to expand. Newport generally ranks in the top 20 national fishing ports annually based on landings and value.

The International Terminal (IT) is a critical component to Newport’s commercial fishing success. The IT can accommodate large fishing vessels that do not fit at other port facilities. It is not unusual to see 12-15 large trawl vessels moored at the IT between November 1 and January 10th or between April 1 and May 15th. Crab and shrimp boats and trawlers also use the IT heavily to stage and switch gear throughout the year. In addition to the local boats, Bering Sea crabbers and other large transient vessels stage at the IT before moving up-river for boat work at one of the two Toledo shipyards. In addition to significant fishing gear storage, the IT houses important support businesses including a net shop and fishmeal plant.

The revenue that the Port generates from the commercial fishing industry at the IT has grown significantly over the last four years. In fiscal year 2016-17 the Port received over $467,000 for services and moorage at the IT from 52 unique vessels. The revenue generated at the IT has grown by about 50% from $229,939 in 2013-14. The trend is for even greater commercial fishery revenue increases to the IT in future years.

With the importance of the commercial fishing industry to the Port of Newport in mind, and specifically the importance of the IT to the commercial fleet and dependent economy of Lincoln County, all future use plans for the IT, whether for shipping or any other activity, must consider and accommodate the minimum needs of the fishing fleet. If necessary, plans for the construction of new docks to allow for any new activity should be included while plans should preserve the access for the existing industry.

At a minimum, there should be:

* Space for 12 large catcher vessels to moor (no more than 2 deep) at the IT from November 1st through January 10th and April 1 through May 15th at the same time there is direct dock access always for at least two vessels to be actively loading and unloading.
* At all other times of the year there should be room available to moor at least six catcher vessels (no more than 2 deep) while there is direct dock access always for at least one vessel to be actively loading and unloading.
* Twelve months out of the year there should be access to a gear hoist for use by local crab, shrimp and trawl vessels to load and unload gear, as well as a clear path between the storage area and the dock
* Twelve months out of the year there should be ample space to lay down and work on trawl nets
* Twelve months out of the year there should be a clear route for trucks to access the fishmeal plant

Any consideration given to the development of shipping or other activities from the IT should recognize both current and future use needs of the commercial fishing industry who have been the primary users of the facility for the last thirty years. Also, the financial impacts to the industry and community must be analyzed.

———————————————————–

In response to Newport’s fishing fleet lays it on the line…by Heather Munro Mann

Peter Bregman wrote:
 
I purchased 200 acres near Waldport in 2004. Upon retiring from my former profession of finance and investment and needing to learn more about growing timber, I joined the Lincoln County Small Woodland Association (OSWA) and then was elected Chairman in 2013.

In 2013, our association began working with the Port of Newport and Teevin Brothers to help re-establish a Log Export International Terminal. The Port, the timber growers and Teevin Brothers invested a lot of time and expense, winning a US Dept Transportation $2 million grant to make that a reality.
 
Not having such a facility in place has cost the local timber growers needed revenue, losing opportunities for a more competitive market and incurring substantial transportation costs to haul logs much further up or down the road. This was and continues to be lost revenue to them and to the Port in meeting their financial obligations as well as lost employment opportunities for the residents of Lincoln County. It’s been an uphill battle, and even though the Port had accommodated a log export terminal in the past, local neighbors objected to the newly rejuvenated International Terminal, and now the Midwater Trawlers Cooperative demands primary use of the facility year round.
 
The Port Board of Commissioners went through the expense of having the Beckett Group review all of the plans, and after having the opportunity to review that report, I fully concur with the groups’ analysis. Having been in the investment market for 40 years, I know and I am sure you know that to prosper, we must diversify our investments with income coming from different sources. Multiple terminal operations will add to the diversity of our community investments. Because the Commissioners are elected to see that these operations are successful, diversity should be a key objective.

The timber market, a sustainable one, is the oldest; plans for improving the port are in place, the companies involved are reputable; and the loan package available is very favorable, but the loan has an expiration date at the end of September. Neither we nor the Port Commission want to miss that deadline. The International Terminal’s success depends on their leadership. To make it work, they must bring all the various groups needing to use the terminal together.

My advice to the Newport Port Board of Commissioners is to unite, focus on your goals, work out the details, and follow the course of your plan. Success will come from positive action, not inaction.

We should be glad that this decision can be made on a local level, rather than in Salem or Washington.

Thank you for the opportunity for allowing me to bring the OSWA view of the situation to your attention.

Peter Bregman

———————————————-

Judy & Jerry Pelletier wrote:

We support using Newport’s International Terminal for log and agricultural exports and near-shore barging of waste-paper and/or other materials as originally projected and financed (US Dept Transportation $2 million grant).

As small woodlands owners in Lincoln County, with a nice stand of mature hemlock, a species specific to the export market, we have waited patiently for many years, as have many woodlands owners, hoping that our capital investment could be realized.

We feel that the Port of Newport, the Terminal, Lincoln Co. and State of Oregon will benefit greatly from the harvest of our hemlock from Harvest Tax, State Income Tax, Port Terminal operations, etc. (Longshoreman Yale Fogarty stated in the minutes of 6/09/2017 Commission meeting that the facilities were built for shipping with money from shipping and that the Port is losing money and needs shipping income.)

Considering that the impetus and the grant money for the Port improvements came as a result of timber and agricultural export potential, we feel that decisions should be made to facilitate the return of shipping and export revenue to our Port. Therefore, shipping should take precedent over the unicentric demands of the Midwater Trawlers Cooperative with the hope that we all may find a pathway for cooperation that will enhance each others’ fortunes.

Judy & Jerry Pelletier


Weather or Not: The Marine Push

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Jul 272017
 

Thursday, July 27th – Lincoln County

Summary: Mostly sunny, windy yesterday; low clouds, fog, drizzle overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 67F/58F/25mph/~0.01”
Depoe Bay: 63F/52F/21mph/0.01”
Newport: 63F/52F/26mph/0.01”
Waldport: 62F/54F/19mph/0.01”
Yachats: 61F/53F/22mph/0.02”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: overcast @ 1,700’
Visibility: 10 miles/Wind: calm/Altimeter: 30.19”

Forecast: Meteorologists call it ‘the marine push.’ And it was strong enough to give us not only low clouds and fog but even a just-recordable amount of drizzle overnight. The low clouds are expected to break up as the day progresses. Then more of the same over the next week with night/morning low clouds and fog, maybe some drizzle, afternoon/evening clearing, late-day sea breezes ramping up to 25-30 mph and temps at or a little below seasonal. Highs 60-65F, lows 50-55F.

Eclipse Viewing… While a precise forecast is well beyond the range of current projections, a look at historical records can provide some insight into the chances of a clear sky on the morning of August 21st. Considering fog, marine low clouds and the possibility of storms, we can expect about a 60% chance that the sky will be obscured. The National Weather Service has a website with additional information about the Eclipse here.

wxon-twitterBe sure to follow Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to keep current on the latest conditions. You’ll get updated travel info and notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings. Follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are dry, temps 50-55F. Willamette Valley roads are dry, thermometer readings 60-65F. The Columbia River Gorge has dry pavement, temperatures 60-70F. For the Cascades, highways are dry, 50-55F, the free air freezing level is 14,000 feet. * An interactive map of the latest Northwest/Central Oregon travel weather is available here. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck before hitting the road.

Marine: Winds are N 5 knots this morning with seas 3 feet at 7 seconds. High pressure will remain over the NE Pacific, keeping winds out of the north to northwest. Winds will generally peak during the afternoon and evening hours and be strongest across the waters off the Central Coast versus areas farther north. A trough of low pressure over northern California will strengthen this weekend resulting in winds reaching small craft advisory level gusts to 25 knots likely returning and lasting into next week. Seas through the weekend will remain short period, but generally 6 feet or less. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Sunshine and patchy fog, breezy, surf 2-4 feet (low).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
07/27 Thu 9:53 AM -0.67 L
07/27 Thu 4:33 PM 7.85 H
07/27 Thu 10:24 PM 1.65 L
07/28 Fri 4:23 AM 7.13 H

In Short: Cloudy/foggy nights and mornings, clearing/windy afternoons and evenings.