Jun 302014
 

7:13am Report of a natural gas leak from a person driving by on 101 at Salishan Resort. Depoe Bay Fire Rescue enroute.

7:38am After a good sniff around the area Depoe Bay firefighters didn’t detect any natural gas odors – called it a false alarm and headed back to headquarters.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 7:17 AM
Jun 292014
 
Click on ad for details

Click on ad for details

Screen Shot 2014-06-29 at 9.28.14 PM

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 9:31 PM
Jun 292014
 

7pm
North Lincoln Fire Rescue is enroute to a report of a stranded boater in a 12 foot aluminum boat near the mouth of the Siletz River.

Boater said his starter rope broke.

7:25pm – Boater rescued, boat towed.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 7:02 PM
Jun 292014
 

Velella Jellyfish Washing ashore in what will be a big Peee-yeww in a day or tewwww! Kerry Terrel photo

Velella Jellyfish
Washing ashore in what will be a big Peee-yeww in a day or tewwww!
Kerry Terrel photo


Patterson State Park Beach Just south of Waldport

Patterson State Park Beach
Just south of Waldport
Judy Weir photos

mystery blogs 3mystery blobs 2mystery blobs judy weir
How they appear at sea

How they appear at sea
Udder Guy photo

Click photos to enlarge

We got our answer from Jenni Remillard, Heather Dixon, Steve Farish, Adam Wechter, Laura Lou Clark, James Golden, Gene Tougas, and a number of others.

This from James Golden:

Each Velella velella is composed of a float and a sail according to Ricketts and Calvin – and the orientation of the sail is different on either side of the North American continent. Pacific Velella have their sail on a diagonal from the northwest to southeast. The sail’s orientation in the wind causing it to tack at a 45 degree angle away from the following wind – it will blow offshore in light southerly winds. Stronger southerly or westerly winds will cause the animal to show up on shore. Velella has tentacles and a mouth – likely adapted to feed on plankton in the drift.

Mary says it’s mating time for the little jellies which explains their being beached. I’m sure there’s a reason in there somewhere.

This proves that every time I write a story, it’s to the vast human encyclopedia of the public. Rather intimidating, don’tcha think?

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 4:18 PM
Jun 292014
 
Maharet - needs at home!

Maharet – needs at home!

Our Pet of the Week for the week of July 2 is Maharet, a gorgeous spayed, female, black Domestic Short Hair cat; and one of our favorite kitties of all time!! Maharet was originally adopted from us about 5 months ago, but her new mom had some medical issues and could no longer care for her. Now Maharet is hoping to find a new home where she can be as happy as she was in her last home.

Maharet is an EXPERT CUDDLER; she loves to put her little paws around your neck and nuzzle into your chin. She will happily cuddle with you for hours while you watch t.v., read a book, or just chat about the day. Maharet DOES NOT get along well with other kitties, so she must go to a home where she can be the only kitty; with this much love to give, she just doesn’t want to have to share you with other cats! If you are looking for a rare gem of a cat, please ask to meet Maharet!

The fee to adopt any kitty is only $10.00! All kitty adoptions include a vet visit (generously supplied by our local veterinarians), microchip, and vaccinations, as well as a free bag of food courtesy of The Feed Corral. Please contact the shelter to find out if the animal you want is still available.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Please come and visit all the animals at your Lincoln County Animal Shelter, located at 510 NE Harney St. in Newport (just east of the Fairgrounds, across Harney). Hours are: Tuesday through Saturday from 12pm until 5pm. You can also see all of our available animals on our website at www.lincolncountyanimalshelter.org.

Also, if you can help us restock our pet food pantry for our Meals on Wheels and Food Bank programs, that will really help. We distribute hundreds of pounds of pet food each month to those in need.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 3:39 PM
Jun 292014
 

Chris Burns Weather

Sunday, June 29th – Lincoln County

Summary: An amalgam of weather conditions infused our Saturday with a variety of moods. Mostly cloudy skies with occasional sunbreaks, a breeze at times, high temps in the mid-60s and, as expected, a few lingering showers left over from the recent storm system. Precipitation levels were relatively shallow; Lincoln City received the least rain, Yachats the most. Southwest winds blew 10-15 mph gusting into the low-20s during the midday hours, but fell light again in the early evening. By midnight, the wind went calm and, except for a couple of short periods of drizzle, it was dry overnight. This morning, broken overcast, no wind and temps in the upper-50s greeted early risers.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Rain…
Lincoln City: 64F/57F/0.02”
Depoe Bay: 62F/57F/0.07”
Newport: 64F/55F/0.05”
Waldport: 66F/57F/0.04”
Yachats: 62F/56F/0.15”

Forecast: We’re gradually working toward a stretch of Summer weather, beginning later today, lasting through the week and into the holiday weekend. We should see mostly sunny skies by noon and highs around 65F. For the second day of the 30th Annual Lincoln City Summer Kite Festival, there’ll be a good breeze with classic northwest winds of 10-15 mph by this afternoon. Mostly clear tonight with beefier nor’westers gusting to 20 mph or so and lows of 50-55F. Sunny and warmer tomorrow; we could hit 70F but stronger northwest winds are in the mix. Outlook is for a warm one on Tuesday with the mercury peaking around 75F or even a little higher. Mostly sunny and cooler for the rest of the week as high temps revert to seasonal at around 65F, lows 55F with various intensities of northwest winds.

4th of July Weekend… Clouds and sun, dry, highs of 60-65F.

Travel: In the Coast Range today, mostly sunny and 65-75F. Valley destinations will have gradual clearing with highs of 70-75F. For the Cascades, partly cloudy; the freezing level is at 11,000 feet. Outlook for weekend travelers is for dry pavement today and tonight.

Cascades Snow Pack: Currently 11”, a loss of 2” since yesterday.

Marine: Winds are transitioning from southerly to northerly today, and this morning they were halfway between, coming out of the W 5-10 knots with a fresh swell running at 9 feet. As of 8:00am, Depoe Bay bar is closed to all recreational vessels and uninspected passenger vessels 32 feet and less. Yaquina Bay bar is unrestricted. The large swells that arrived late yesterday are subsiding today and should be down to 8 feet, dropping farther, to 6 feet, by tonight. The breeze veers to NW this afternoon, 5-10 knots but rises to 10-15 knots gusting 20 during the evening. Tomorrow, N winds building to 20-25 knots by afternoon, seas 6 feet with a 4 foot chop. Outlook is for northerlies 10-20 knots occasionally gusting to 25 through the week with 4 foot lumpy combined seas. NOTE: The Port of Newport’s South Beach Marina fuel dock has been reopened and is in full operation for diesel and gasoline products.

Click here to download the Chris Burns book, "Family Voyaging"

On the Beach… Becoming mostly sunny, breezy, surf 6-7 feet (moderate).
For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
Tides
06/29 Sun 08:26 AM -0.77 L
06/29 Sun 03:11 PM 6.94 H
06/29 Sun 08:22 PM 3.01 L
06/30 Mon 02:09 AM 7.89 H

In Short: Clearing, moderate winds, then Summer.

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 8:03 AM
Jun 292014
 
Breaching killer whales Robert Pittman - NOAA

Breaching killer whales
Robert Pittman – NOAA

NOAA has just released a ten year study of the life and times of a special pod of Killer Whales that roam Puget Sound, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the eastern shores of Vancouver Island in Summer and then Winter along the Washington, Oregon and Central California coastlines.

NOAA took on the task of learning more about these magnificent creatures because the pod wasn’t growing in numbers that could be expected by being an “Apex Predator.” Despite it’s hunting prowess, capable of rendering Great White Sharks powerless and suitable for dining on, the pods numbers simply weren’t growing.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

NOAA researchers learned a lot about these specific whales, what they prefer to eat, where they travel and, sadly, how they have become among the most toxic contaminated mammals on the planet.

Here’s an informative video on what they found…and about the questions they’re raising as to killer whale diseases, effects of climate change and the development of offshore energy devices.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 7:52 AM
Jun 282014
 
Newport Fireworks seen from Pacific Maritime & Heritage Museum Courtesy photo

Newport Fireworks seen
from Pacific Maritime & Heritage Museum
Courtesy photo

From Newport Chamber of Commerce

(Newport, Oregon) – It’s one of the biggest displays in Oregon on the Fourth of July and it happens in Newport. The geographic layout of the central Oregon coast hotspot adds even more dimension to the experience: the explosions bounce off the surrounding hills and cause an impressive echo. This can literally triple or quadruple the effects of the mortars.

Those massive rounds of rockets are fired off from inside Yaquina Bay, a central location from which to view the fireworks from all over town. The event snags about ten thousand people every year, who can watch from the beaches, nearby hills, all around the bay, three miles up the Yaquina River and South Beach.

To top it off, dozens of private boats wander the bay, some shooting off flares or fireworks of their own – some high enough that they are at eye level as you’re driving over the Yaquina Bay Bridge.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Many of Newport’s boat charter services are offering bay trips during the fireworks celebration. Those interested are encouraged to contact a local charter service for further information.

The fireworks begin at dusk, but numerous other fun events happen around town that are worth heading out for earlier in the day.

Looking for some helpful tips on where to watch and dealing with traffic? Newport Chamber Executive Director Lorna Davis offers a few insights.

“The best advice for people who want to see the fireworks on the 4th over Yaquina Bay is find a place early to situate themselves,” Davis said. “Spending the afternoon on the Bayfront or in South Beach, which are both great vantage points for viewing, could include visiting the Aquarium or Rogue or some of the businesses and restaurants in those areas. Parking can prove challenging, however there are public areas to park. The public parking area at 9th and Hurbert is a good example.” The Pacific Maritime and Heritage Museum is another great spot for viewing the explosive spectacle.

For more information on Newport’s fireworks and Fourth of July activities, call the Newport Chamber of Commerce at 800-262-7844.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

More Events Around Town on Fourth of July

Oregon Coast Aquarium Behind the Scenes Tours. How does the Aquarium care for a swarm of stinging jellies, a five-hundred pound California Sea Lion and dozens of toothy sharks? Travel behind the scenes with us to explore the ins and outs of caring for over 20,000 animals everyday. The tour lasts 30 minutes. 1:15 pm – 1:45 pm. $10 members / $15 nonmembers. Oregon Coast Aquarium. 2820 S.E. Ferry Slip Road. Newport, Oregon. 541-867-3474. www.aquarium.org.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Sea Lion and Seal Kisses. No trip to the Aquarium is complete without a fishy kiss from a sea lion or a Harbor seal. This is 20-30 minute experience including a behind-the-scenes look at our pinniped facility followed by a whiskery kiss from a sea lion or harbor seal and fun photo opportunities. Ages 8 and up. Maximum number of participants per encounter: 10. To make your reservation, register online, call (541) 867-3474; or reserve with admissions staff on the day of your visit (if availability allows). 2:15 pm – 2:45 pm. $35 members, $40 nonmembers. Oregon Coast Aquarium. 2820 S.E. Ferry Slip Road. Newport, Oregon. 541-867-3474. www.aquarium.org.

History and Jazz at Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center. Enjoy a premium, exclusive seat to fireworks on the Bayfront as well as local jazz band Past Forward as part of a fundraiser event. 8 p.m. Admission to the fundraiser is $10 in advance for adults, $5 for kids (12 and under), available for purchase at The Burrows House Museum and The Maritime Center. Tickets at the door will be $15 for adults and $7.50 for kids. Pacific Maritime & Heritage Center, 333 SE Bay Blvd., Newport. For more information, call 541-265-7509. www.oregoncoast.history.museum/

Newport Symphony Spectacular. 4 pm. Free, and general admission seating. Newport Intermediate School, 825 NE 7th St. Newport, Oregon. http://newportsymphony.org/

Click on ad for details

Click on ad for details

4th of July Fun with Marine Discovery Tours. Join a party aboard the deluxe and spacious 65-foot Discovery from 7:30 – 10:30 p.m. Three-hour narrated harbor and river cruise that includes: pulling crab pots; red, white and blueberry shortcake with coffee, tea and cocoa. $65 Adults; $45 Youth (12 and under). 345 SW Bay Blvd, Newport, Oregon. 541-265-6200. www.marinediscovery.com/Marinediscoverytours.html

For lodging and activity information and complete calendar of events see www.discovernewport.com and www.newportchamber.org. 800-262-7844.

Click ad for information

Click ad for information

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 11:22 PM
Jun 282014
 

central coast fire district

A young man from Portland learned the wet way that it’s easier to walk on sand at low tide than on water when the tide’s coming in.

Central Coast Fire Rescue personnel were summoned to the middle of Alsea Bay on a report of a man stranded on a sand bar under the Waldport Bridge. But there was no sign of a boat.

Upon arrival in their water rescue craft, the man…in his mid-20’s, complete with a very large cast on his left leg, said he decided to depart the Alsea Bay Visitors Center at the south end of the bridge for what he thought would be a pleasant sunset stroll to an offshore sand bar.

Click Ad for details

Click Ad for details

Unfortunately, the tide started coming rather swiftly, which put the water well above his cast. He managed to crawl up onto the sandbar, but there he was – with the tide still coming in and the sandbar shrinking under his feet. So he began to yell.

His screams were heard on the beach back at the visitors centers and somebody called 9-1-1.

Central Coast rescuers launched their rescue boat and pulled up alongside the sandbar. They quickly loaded the stranded man aboard.

Click on ad for details

Click on ad for details

Back at the Alsea Port Docks the man, although quite wet and cold, denied medical attention and set off walking toward Ray’s Market. Soonafter he was seen getting into a pickup driven by what appeared to be somebody he knew.

All in an evening’s work by Central Coast Fire Rescue.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 11:08 PM
Jun 282014
 
Big Humboldt Squid Off the port side... Gary Stephenson photo

Big Humboldt Squid
Off the port side…
Gary Stephenson photo
The Whale’s Tail photo

While out scouting big whales aboard a Whale’s Tail excursion boat out of Depoe Bay, patrons came across this denizen of the deep, a Humboldt Squid hanging out near the surface, something out of their normal cruising depth of around 600 feet.

The Humboldt Squid have become more common off the coast of Oregon, Washington and even Southeast Alaska during El Nino weather patterns. But scientists say that with increased acidification of ocean waters, the squid will likely be more inclined to feed much closer to the surface because higher acid water slows down their metabolic rate and rate of intake of oxygen. So they’re having to hang out close to the surface where oxygen levels are much higher than their common cruising depth.

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Share on Facebook
 Posted by at 10:56 PM