Weather or Not: Unlucky Forecast

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Nov 132015
 

Chris Burns Weather

Friday, Nov. 13th – Lincoln County

Summary: The first weather system in the current series arrived just after lunch yesterday bringing some light rain and increasing winds. By sunset, it was up to speed as southerlies increased to 20-25 mph with higher gusts and the rain became heavier and steadier. It rained on and off overnight and the breeze continued unabated. Overall precipitation amounts by early today on the Central Coast varied from under a quarter of an inch to nearly an inch at Lincoln City; the main band of rain associated with this front came ashore north of us and just barely clipped our northern area. At dawn, it was still windy but the rain had eased up.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 57F/47F/27mph/0.83”
Depoe Bay: 55F/41F/33mph/0.46”
Newport: 54F/41F/32mph/0.29”
Waldport: 55F/42F/31mph/0.17”
Yachats: 56F/43F/34mph/0.28”

WARNING NWS SWSA Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for significant rainfall possible through Saturday night over portions of Northwest Oregon. The primary rain will shift south and east as a cold front across the area tomorrow and tomorrow night. This may bring a period of heavy rainfall. Breezy winds with the front will strip leaves off trees and contribute to clogged storm drains. This may lead to ponding of water on the roadways in addition to localized flooding. 1 to 2 inches of rainfall are expected across the area through Sunday night.

A High Surf Advisory has been issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Oregon Coast in effect from noon today through midnight tonight. West to northwest swells 17 to 19 feet with periods around 17 to 18 seconds will spread into local waters this afternoon and continue this evening. Wave heights will peak late this afternoon and evening. Avoid walking on jetties, rocks, coastal cliffs and along the water’s edge as waves may rise unexpectedly and sweep you into turbulent and frigid waters.

A Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for the best snow potential since last Winter for the Cascade highway passes Sunday through Monday. Modest rains will continue today through Saturday evening. An additional 1 to 3 inches of rain is possible with the bulk of it occurring as a strong cold front crosses the Cascades late Saturday night. Snow levels will dramatically lower below the passes late Saturday night, ultimately falling to around 2,000 feet near daybreak Sunday. Cold moist air under westerly flow will likely bring several inches of snow to the Cascade highway passes Sunday morning through Monday afternoon. Snow accumulations will be spread out over those two days but could be heavy enough at times to produce periods of hazardous driving conditions. 10 to 13 inches of snow will be possible over the course of the 36 hour period at pass elevations. Up to 20 inches is possible at higher elevations.

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Forecast: With all of these latest weather announcements, it sounds like a Friday the 13th alright. Rain is likely WON WINDY RAINYtoday, high around 55F and sou’westers 15-25 mph gusting 35. There should be a short break from the rain late this afternoon through midnight before the heaviest precipitation arrives and the breeze starts building. Tomorrow, heavy rain at times and southerly winds rising to 25-35 gusting as high as 50. Outlook is for more heavy rain tomorrow night, showers and possible thunderstorms Sunday, rain Monday and Tuesday, and then a chance of rain/showers Wednesday and Thursday. Highs 50-55F, lows 45-50F.

Surface Rescue

Call or email George today!

Travel: In the Coast Range, there’s wet pavement on the passes this morning with temperatures near 40F; a chance of rain, breezy today and 55-60F. Valley destinations are expecting a chance of rain, the thermometer rising to 55-60F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for rain, southwest winds 15-25 mph gusting 30, a high of 55F. For the Cascades, the highways are wet, temps 35-40F; a 50-50 chance of rain, the snow level is well above the passes at 7,000 feet. Outlook for weekend travelers is windy and rainy in all of Northwest Oregon but a plummeting snow level, dropping below the Cascade highway passes by tomorrow night, accompanied by considerable snowfall, could make driving in the mountains hazardous through Sunday night; carry chains or traction tires.

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Marine: Winds are SW 15-20 knots gusting 25 this morning and rough seas have risen to 12 feet at 11 seconds. A WON SCASmall Craft Advisory for winds is in effect through 7:00pm this evening and then it is replaced by a Gale Watch in effect until Saturday evening. SW winds 20-25 knots gusting 30 today with swells 12 feet building to very rough seas 18 feet at 14 seconds. Tonight, southerlies increasing to 25-30 knots gusting 35 with combined seas 20 feet. The S wind rises further tomorrow to 30 knots gusting 40 and square seas 15 feet at 15 seconds. Outlook is for NW winds 20-25 knots gusting 30 on Sunday, very steep seas 15 feet at 13 seconds, and then sou’westers 20-25 knots Monday and Tuesday with swells 12-13 feet. Always check the latest Bar Reports before you venture offshore.

On the Beach… Some rain, breezy, surf 15-25 feet (high).
* See High Surf Advisory above, and be aware of sneaker waves that will be significantly higher than those that precede or follow them. Never turn your back on the ocean.
* Tides
11/13 Fri 06:37 AM 3.10 L
11/13 Fri 12:38 PM 8.74 H
11/13 Fri 07:19 PM -0.49 L
11/14 Sat 02:01 AM 7.43 H

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In Short: Rain likely, moderate wind, then heavy rain, very windy and continued stormy.

 Posted by at 7:55 AM

Newport: Pit Bull attacks two women outside a car wash – see update below.

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Nov 122015
 

The SUV that the two women escaped to.

The SUV that the two women escaped to.

Both women were bitten, dog owner Michele Elwood was said to have been severely mauled.

Both women were bitten, dog owner Michele Elwood was said to have been severely mauled.


Dog was locked up inside the detail shop.  Retrieved by officers.

Dog was locked up inside the detail shop. Retrieved by officers.


Dangerous Pit Bull was loaded into a secure Animal Control vehicle.

Dangerous Pit Bull was loaded into a secure Animal Control vehicle.

From what News Lincoln County has been able to piece together, two women at the Super Suds car wash were suddenly and viciously attacked by one of the women’s pit bull. The dog reportedly tore into its owner, identified as Michelle Elwood. She suffered bites to both arms and to her chest and reportedly was bleeding badly. Michelle’s friend tried to intervene and save her from the dog and then it turned on her, biting her on both arms, though not as severely it repeatedly bit Michelle.

The dog retreated into Michelle’s detail shop and the door was closed behind it. Arriving paramedics transported both women to Pacific Communities Hospital.

Meanwhile a Sheriff’s Deputy and a Newport Police Officer managed to get a double-noose on the dog and quickly got him loaded into an animal control vehicle. No word on its fate.

Update Friday AM

Michelle Elwood contacted News Lincoln County telling us that a homeless person was walking by which “set off” her pit bull. She said the dog jumped out of a car. But in the process of trying to get it back into the car the dog attacked her and her friend.

Michelle said “My dog is a loving, loyal and awesome dog. There had to be something medically wrong to make her do this. I know I’ll never see her again because the police made me sign a release. They’re holding her for a week to make sure she doesn’t have rabies – which she doesn’t.”

When asked if she’ll get another dog Michelle said “Yes, a pit bull.”

—–Editor’s note: We misunderstood the name of the dog. We regret the error and have made the correction.

 Posted by at 5:01 PM

Lincoln County: Startling rise in Syphilis cases

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Nov 122015
 

Syphilis - advanced stage Wiki Commons photo

Syphilis – advanced stage
Wiki Commons photo


Public Health Officials Note An Unprecedented Increase In Lincoln County Syphilis Cases

Lincoln County Public Health has received reports of 12 new syphilis cases in the last 12 months here in Lincoln County. According to Lincoln County Public Health Officer David Long, MD, there were no syphilis cases in Lincoln County between 2004- 2009. Between 2009 to 2014, the number of syphilis cases in the county ranged from zero – 2 cases per year.

This unprecedented increase in the number of confirmed syphilis cases in the last 12 months in Lincoln County is a serious concern to Public Health officials. More than half of the new syphilis cases in Lincoln County have occurred in women of childbearing age.
Lincoln County’s increase in total syphilis cases is similar to the trend seen in Oregon. Oregon Health Authority infectious disease expert Sean Schafer, MD, reports that syphilis cases in Oregon have increased 1,500% since 2007—from fewer than 30 reported cases to approximately 450 reported cases during 2015.

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted bacterial infection that can be cured with antibiotics if treated in its early stages. Lincoln County Public Health is urging people with the following risk factors to get tested, whether or not symptoms are present:

* People with HIV
* People of either sex who use illicit drugs including, but not limited to, methamphetamine, opioids and cocaine
* People of either sex who engage in sex work or exchange sex for money or other things of value
* People who have or have had other bacterial or viral sexually transmitted infections
* People who have been exposed to syphilis.
* All pregnant women

The disease of syphilis has four stages. The symptoms of syphilis depend on the stage.

*Primary (early) syphilis—a single painless sore on the mouth, genitals, or rectum which lasts between 1-5 weeks and disappears after 6 weeks. Syphilis is most infectious during this stage.
* Secondary syphilis—rashes of the skin, mouth, genitals, and swollen lymph nodes. However, there may be no symptoms at all. Syphilis continues to be infectious during this stage.
Latent syphilis—no symptoms, but the disease process continues.
* Tertiary (last) stage—dementia and neurological problems.
* There is also congenital syphilis, which occurs when a pregnant woman with untreated syphilis transmits the disease to her baby while she is pregnant or during delivery. It may cause miscarriage, stillbirth or neonatal death. It can also cause the child to be chronically disabled.

*During outbreaks like the current one in Oregon and in Lincoln County, all pregnant women should get tested for syphilis at the first prenatal visit, at the beginning of third trimester, and at delivery. A simple blood test is needed to test for this infection.

People who are concerned that they may have been exposed to, have symptoms of, or have risk factors for syphilis can ask their doctor or health care provider to specifically do the blood test for syphilis infection. Testing is also available through Lincoln County Public Health.

Additional information on syphilis is available at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website: http://www.cdc.gov/std/syphilis/.

Persons who would like to talk to a public health nurse about their risk of infection and options for scheduling a syphilis test can call Lincoln County Public Health at 541-265-4179.

 Posted by at 4:46 PM

There’s just something about communicating with an underwater robot!!

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Nov 122015
 

Underwater robots at  Oregon Coast Aquarium OCA photos

Underwater robots at
Oregon Coast Aquarium
OCA photos

OCA underwater robot

Students’ Underwater Robot Returns to Aquarium after Trip Abroad

Newport, Oregon—At first glance, a cube of PVC pipe trailed by a string of wires and cables is a puzzling presence for some Oregon Coast Aquarium visitors in the new exhibit, Secrets of Shipwrecks: Part History. Part Mystery.

In the exhibit, it represents one of the tools researchers use for underwater exploration and archaeology, and pays homage to the fact that people from all walks of life can wield this technology.

The contraption sports scratches and wear, and zip-ties hold repurposed plastic water bottles to its control tether. The underwater remotely operated vehicle, or ROV for short, is the creation of three Taft High School students under guidance of Science Department Chair Noah Lambie.

Team RUWE (Robotic Underwater Exploration) created the ROV for the Northwest Regional MATE (Marine Advanced Technology Education) Competition. Each student assumed a role, with Kyle Macrae as CFO, Hunter Bishop as CEO and Eneki Trujillo as Head Engineer. RUWE took the title in the Ranger Class, qualifying them for the international competition at Newfoundland, Canada.

The opportunity to compete against 60 other teams from universities and prestigious prep schools across the globe presented a tremendous opportunity and set of challenges. Their winnings only covered a portion of the trip, Lambie and the students started a crowdfunding campaign, and sold totes and shirts to make up the difference.

The trio’s previous triumph was in a fresh water pool – not deeper than 12 feet, but the international competition would plunge the students’ robot in Arctic Ocean conditions.

RUWE knew they needed to adjust the robot’s buoyancy control for deep, saline water, and were unsure how their ROV would react to the cold. Lambie reached out to the Aquarium for help. Their first test drive in the Passages of the Deep exhibit deflated the bicycle tube, sending their buoyancy control plans back to the drawing board. Round two proved more successful, and as June drew to a close they headed to Canada.

They found fierce competition; many of the rival ROVs cost more than ten times Taft High’s students’ budget, and were handled by college students. Their innovation and dedication earned them 20th place out of 63 competitors, and the “Bang for the Buck” award.

“This was a huge opportunity for my students,” said Lambie. “They are very capable, natural and intuitive with robotics. Just give them a few projects, a little bit of guidance and let them go.”

The Aquarium offered to exhibit the ROV to honor Team RUWE, and in hopes of inspiring more applied-STEM projects in classrooms and beyond. The ROV will be on display through December of 2016.

 Posted by at 3:18 PM

Traffic Crash near top end of Siletz River Highway 229

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Nov 122015
 

2:25pm
Report of a traffic crash on Siletz River Highway at about mile post 7. That’s 7 miles south of 229’s intersection with Highway 101. Reports say it’s a car off the highway, down an embankment but not quite to the river.

2:41pm
Units are having a hard time finding it.

2:45pm
Units close to calling off the search. Multi emergency vehicles combing the sides of 229 have found no sign of a crashed vehicle.

2:49pm
Search has been called off. North Lincoln Fire units returning to base.

 Posted by at 2:38 PM

Light Up a Life Remembrance – North Lincoln Hospital November 20th

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Nov 122015
 
North Lincoln Hospital Courtesy photo

North Lincoln Hospital
Courtesy photo

Celebrate life this holiday season and remember loved ones who have passed on at the annual Light Up a Life celebration hosted by Samaritan North Lincoln Hospice.

This special evening of reflection and music will take place Friday, Nov. 20, at 6 p.m., at the Health Professions Education Center, 3043 NE 28th St, Lincoln City.

The celebration is a meaningful way to honor loved ones while supporting Samaritan North Lincoln Hospice, which provides end-of-life care and support to patients and their families.
All are welcome to attend the celebration.

Those who wish may make a donation in memory of a loved one and dedicate a personalized memento to be placed on the memorial display.

For more information or to donate a gift in memory of a loved one, call 541-996-7328 or visit samhealth.org/LUAL .

 Posted by at 2:11 PM

Fishin’ with Chris

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Nov 122015
 

Chris Burns - Fishing

CENTRAL COAST FISHING
Week of November 12th

In the Creel: The main focus continues to be inshore with Chinook salmon in the rivers and Dungeness crab in the bays being your best bets this week. While this can be a good time of year for catching rockfish offshore, the ocean has been rough and mostly uncooperative as autumn storms arrive about every other day. And, with both salmon and halibut closed now, there are few reasons to risk it. Decent bay clamming tides are underway, but occurring after dark; razor clams remain off-limits border-to-border due to toxins. Snotty weather is on tap for the next several days, so you can use this pause to hone your lies about the past season. This week’s Fish Tale: 10 percent of the water apparently holds 90 percent of the fish.

Traveling Notary Service

Call now: 541-968-5811 or email Smith.and.Loya@gmail.com

Salmon River: The fall Chinook fishery is producing fair to good results for both boat and bank anglers. Recent rains have moved a lot of fish out of tidewater. Casting lures or bobber fishing tends to be the most productive this time of year.

Siletz River/Bay: The fall Chinook fishery is producing fair to good catches with recent rains moving a lot of fish out of tidewater. The wild Coho fishery continues through November 30th with a daily bag limit of 1 adult Coho and a seasonal limit of 2 adult Coho (in aggregate with other areas with the same bag limit). Summer steelhead fishing is fair to good in the upper river above Moonshine Park.

Yaquina River/Bay: Anglers are having fair to good success for fall Chinook trolling herring or spinners, typically during the incoming tide through high slack. Recent rains have moved a good portion of fish to the upper tidewater reaches and above. The wild Coho fishery continues through November 30th with a daily bag limit of 1 adult Coho and a seasonal limit of 2 adult Coho (in aggregate with other areas with the same bag limit).

Alsea River/Bay: The fall Chinook fishery is producing fair to good results for both bank and boat anglers. Recent rains have helped to move a lot of Chinook into the good river-bank access sections. Casting lures or bobber fishing is producing depending on the section and conditions. The wild Coho fishery is closed for the season.

Central Coast Reservoirs and Lakes: The Coho salmon fisheries in Siltcoos and Tahkenitch Lakes are just getting going. With some recent rain and big tide series fresh Coho should be migrating into the lakes. Look to fish near the lake outlets and by the major tributaries that enter the lakes. Casting or trolling spinners or various plugs can be effective. Fishing for the various warmwater fish species is fair to good. There are numerous lakes in the Florence area that can provide good opportunity and have both boat and bank access.

Saltwater angling and shellfish harvesting…
Continue reading »

 Posted by at 11:00 AM

Logging slash burn season: Lots of smoke out there in the woods

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Nov 122015
 
Slash burns likely through the first week of December.

Slash burns likely through the first week of December.

Slash burn up Yachats River Road

Slash burn up Yachats River Road
Ken Gagne photos

It’s definitely the “Burn Season” around western Oregon, as well as here on the coast. Many logging operations that have shut down for the winter leaveing behind big piles of logging debris and brush. In order to reduce the fire danger next Spring and Summer, timber owners obtain permits from the Oregon Department of Forestry to burn their slash piles. And depending on the weather and the wind patterns, they get permission to do just that.

Forestry officials say that slash burning is allowed only when wind conditions are light, allowing the smoke to rise in a vertical column up to around four to five thousand feet where it can dissipate over a wide area and not be a problem to residents. When winds are blowing below four to five thousand feet the smoke becomes a major problem.

Officials told News Lincoln County that there are a couple slash burns up the Yachats river which should be over by the end of today. There’s another slash fire that will be lit northwest of Siletz this afternoon at around 2pm. There is another one about 4 miles south of Burnt Woods that will be lit sometime around 4pm.

ODF says the slash burn season is likely to run through the first week of December. Again, permits are required and are issued only when there is calm air up to about four to five thousand feet. Otherwise, no slash burning allowed.

 Posted by at 10:49 AM