Feb 222015
 

Chris Burns Weather

Sunday, Feb. 22nd – Lincoln County

Summary: After a chilly start, yesterday became another one of those more characteristic of May than February. A few clouds mixed with the sunshine early in the day but by afternoon it was clear as a bell. High temperatures climbed to near 60F albeit north-northeast winds of 10-15 mph gusting 25 made it feel a touch cooler. After sunset, the waxing crescent Moon was grinnin’ like a big ol’ Cheshire cat, skies remained cloudless all night, lows dropped to around 40F and the predicted strong east winds did not materialize. At daybreak, clear skies and a light northeast wind greeted early risers.

Past 24 Hours High/Low…
Lincoln City: 57F/44F
Depoe Bay: 59F/42F
Newport: 59F/36F
Waldport: 59F/41F
Yachats: 59F/41F

WARNING NWS SWSAdvisory: A Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for breezy to windy conditions with unusually dry air for Northwest Oregon today through Monday. Conditions did not develop as expected for areas east of the Cascades and that has diminished the wind potential today for areas west of the Cascades. Breezy to windy conditions are still expected today in a reduced capacity from previous expectations. The main focus for wind continues to be along the Cascades, the western Columbia River Gorge and the exposed terrain of the Coast Range. Expect to see frequent gusts of 35-45 mph at those locations with locally higher speeds possible. Other areas will likely see gusts of 25-35 mph with an outside chance of seeing a brief period of gusts reaching 40-45 mph. Additionally, a combination of gusty east winds, summer-like low humidity values and dry vegetation continue to bring a threat of rapidly spreading wildfires given a receptive fuel bed. Therefore, open burning of any kind is still not advised until after winds decrease Monday.

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Forecast: So, good news for the Festival finale today. Seafood & Wine revelers won’t be facing east winds as strong as earlier projections indicated. While still on the table, it now looks like the breeze, if it shows, will top out around 25-30 mph. WON SUNNYSunshine and thermometer readings of about 55F are on tap. For tonight, east winds gusting 25 mph or so remain feasible; clear skies and cool with temps dropping into the mid-30s. Expect sunny skies, light winds and a high around 60F tomorrow. Outlook is for mostly sunny Tuesday, mostly cloudy Wednesday through Saturday with a chance of light rain during the period and the mercury floating between 40F and 55F.

Travel: In the Coast Range today, sunny and windy with 50F. Valley destinations are expecting sunshine, breezy and a high of 55F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for sunny skies, east winds gusting 30-35 mph, temps around 55F. For the Cascades, there is bare pavement on the passes this morning, it is very windy, temperatures are 25-30F; sunny and windy with gusts to 55 mph today, the freezing level is at the surface. Outlook for weekend travelers in all areas is clear and breezy with dry pavement through tonight.

Surface Rescue

Call or email George today!

Cascades Snow Pack: Currently 32”, no change since yesterday; no change in the past seven days; 91” less than this date last year; 92% below the 30-year average Snow Water Equivalent (total amount of moisture in the snow pack). To read our Special Report: Oregon’s Dismal Snow Pack, click here.

Ski Report – New Snow/Base/Condition…
Hoodoo 0”/1”/closed
Willamette Pass 0”/0”/closed
Mt. Bachelor 0”/47”/windy, firm packed
Mt. Hood Ski Bowl 0”/12”/windy, tubing only
Mt. Hood Meadows 0”/30”/windy, frozen granular, icy spots
Timberline 0”/45”/high winds, lifts on hold

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Click ad for details

Marine: Winds are light easterly nearshore this morning but NE 10-15 knots gusting 20 offshore with square seas 5 WON SCAfeet at 5 seconds. As of 8:00am, Depoe Bay and Yaquina Bay bars are unrestricted. A Small Craft Advisory for winds is in effect through tomorrow morning. NE winds 15-25 knots gusting 30 are still expected today and tonight along with choppy 5 foot seas. For tomorrow, nor’easters subsiding to 10-15 knots gusting 20 and a 5 foot swell. Outlook is for N to NW winds 5-15 knots Tuesday through Thursday with swells 4-6 feet.

On the Beach… Sunny, breezy, surf 3-4 feet (low).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
02/22 Sun 08:39 AM 0.57 L
02/22 Sun 02:47 PM 8.17 H
02/22 Sun 08:44 PM 0.85 L
02/23 Mon 03:10 AM 9.30 H

Call Craig today at 541-270-4565

Call Craig today at 541-270-4565

In Short: Mostly clear, possibly windy, then light winds and becoming unsettled.

 Posted by at 8:02 AM
Feb 212015
 

Mount Bachelor southwest of Bend. Kim Carlson photo

Mount Bachelor southwest of Bend.
Kim Carlson photo


Sisters and Broken Top from well southwest of Bend. Kim Carlson Photo

Sisters and Broken Top from well southwest of Bend. Probably from Elk Lake on Cascade Lakes Highway.
Kim Carlson Photo

Kim Carlson, who regularly sends us exquisite photos of her flowers, birdlife, elk and other critters who co-exist with her out Beaver Creek Road, decided to hit the road this weekendl And she sent us back some stunningly beautiful photos of snow-capped Cascade mountains.

Nicely done Kim! Keep ‘em comin’!

 Posted by at 7:41 PM
Feb 212015
 
Jesse is missing from his Toledo home on Gaither near 8th.  If you've seen him or know where he might be call Jutta at 541-272-9066.

Jesse is back home, safe and sound

Jesse got out while his family was away from their Toledo home. They were worried sick. Mom sent NewsLincolnCounty.com a picture along with a plea for help. And we got on the case right away. We put Jesse’s sweet mug on the website and started making some phone calls to the usual places for finding animals.

And Shez-aaam! Jesse’s back home to the tearful glee of his family.

Happy news indeed.

 Posted by at 6:24 PM
Feb 212015
 
Key to it all... Sarah Gayle

Key to it all…
Sarah Gayle

Toledo First Weekend Features Sarah Gayle Show “The Key to Everything”

Join Sarah Gayle at SolaLuna Studios this weekend, March 7 and 8, as she celebrates First Weekend Art with the theme, “The Key to it all.” Sarah is offering two special activities and invites the public to participate either day for a great opportunity to get inspired.

The first is a key exchange. Bring a key you no longer use and label it with your answer to the phrase, “The Key to it all is…” Sarah will be creating an art display of these in the gallery and will use them in a future post about creativity on the SolaLuna website. If you don’t have a key to bring, she have some extras for you to create with right there in the gallery. In exchange for your keys and ideas, she will share some fascinating facts about an ancient Roman tradition involving keys that you can practice yourself.

“As a Creative (artist and designer) I play with and experience color in a variety of ways,” she says, “In all its forms it fascinates me! From the transparent interactions with watercolors and inks, the opaque blending of oils and gouache, to the pairing of colors next to each other in textile design, and the blues of a sun shadow on a white wall, it is the interplay and reactions that are beautiful and captivating to me. As the spotlight artist for Toledo’s First Weekend, I want to share what is my key to it all, Fletcher Color!”

At 2:00 both days, Sarah Gayle will be hosting an introduction talk on Fletcher Color Control and the historical trail it has left, particularly in impressionist art. Sarah will also share how she has used it to study van Gogh and how the information had a huge impact on her own work and understanding of color. This color management idea is applicable for all kinds of creativity that use color, not just painting. If you struggle to know how to put colors together harmoniously then join Sarah at SolaLuna Studios for First Weekend March 7 and 8 from 11-5 daily and get an introduction to Fletcher. Light refreshments provided. SolaLuna’s new address 179 N Main St in Toledo.

On a Summer Morning Michael Gibbons

On a Summer Morning
Michael Gibbons

Also open for First Weekend is The Yaquina River Museum of Art, located at 151 NE Alder. By popular public choice, “On a Summer Morning” from the “Yaquina” Traveling Exhibit was selected for publication and is being featured in the March First Weekend show. This original painting and eight others from the Yaquina watershed group of 42 are on display at the School House along with information from the Land Conservancy that owns land near Arnold Creek where much of the art was painted. As a “Traveling Exhibit” slated to be shown in regional museums, none of the work is for sale. This exhibit also presents mugs and note cards with various images from the Exhibit that can be purchased in the Museum Gift Shop along with Art books, Jewelry, and Original silk scarves by Paulette Hanson. For more information, call 541-336-1907 or email yrmaoffice@qwestoffice.net.

Willamette Valley View Michael Gibbons

Willamette Valley View
Michael Gibbons

“Willamette Valley View,” an oil painting by Michael Gibbons, has been chosen by Dick Cutler, owner of Flying Dutchman Winery, as a feature art label. This will soon be available as a limited edition of Flying Dutchman wine. The original art work will be on view at the artist’s signature gallery during First Weekend, along with Gibbons’ working sketches of the label. The art was Painted en plein air in an inland valley and Gibbons found the dominating tree and typical Northwest cloudy skies irresistible, working to show the plants growing in this site with color and vigorous bush strokes. “I was striving to show the relationship of a sloping land to upright bushes”, comments the artist. Gallery Michael Gibbons will be open from 11-5 Saturday and Sunday. The artist invites visitors to join him for wine, cheese and conversation while enjoying the art. Michael Gibbons’ Signature Gallery is located in the Uptown Arts District at 140 NE Alder Street. For more information, see www.michaelgibbons.net; email michaelgibbonsart@charter.net; or call (541) 336-2797.

Crinkled Becky Miller

Crinkled
Becky Miller

For Becky Miller, the “Key to it All” is the vigor of living things. She has several new paintings on display in her studio, as well as a large new colorful painting of kelp that is in progress. Also showing will be a wide variety of works by Alice Haga, Caroll Loomis, and Karen Fitzgibbon – all fellow members with Becky of the four woman art group known by the acronym B*A*C*K. Becky Miller Studio is located half a block above Main St. at 167 NE 1st St. in Toledo and will be open from 11-5 pm Saturday and Sunday. Enjoy a glass of wine and talk art! For more information, see www.BeckyMillerArtist.com, www.Facebook.com/Becky Miller, Artist, email becky@beckymillerartist.com, or call 503-504-7289.

Tall Ship Rigging on Yellow Impressions Pacific Studio Angela Lehrbass

Tall Ship Rigging on Yellow
Impressions Pacific Studio
Angela Lehrbass

Impressions Pacific will be featuring the photography of Angela Lehrbass for First Weekend in March. The specific piece she is showcasing is called “Tall Ship Rigging on Yellow”. In addition to the many photographs – primarily of local scenery and sights, and some from around the country – Impressions Pacific also is showing beautiful pottery, glass, stained glass, wood, paintings, and some other handcrafted items. They have something for everyone! You are invited to stop in and see the ever-evolving gallery and studio! Angela’s portrait studio is available for orders for family portraits, senior pictures, bridal/engagements, weddings, etc. Additionally, she photographs artists’ work for reproduction or catalogs.

Angela and her husband, Rodney, also do custom picture framing. They have over a fifteen hundred corner samples to choose from, and do excellent quality work at affordable prices. There will a woodturning demonstration all weekend by Master Woodturner, Rodney Lehrbass, as well as refreshments. Impressions Pacific is located at 333 N. Main St., between “Gallery Briseño” and “Clayworks”. Hours for First Weekend are 10-6 on Saturday, and 11-5 on Sunday. Visit them on the web at www.ImpressionsPacific.com or on Facebook at www.facebook.com/ImpressionsPacific, or call (541) 336-2207

 Posted by at 3:12 PM
Feb 212015
 

snowstakeBy Weatherman Chris Burns

First, let’s look at the latest statistics. The snow pack values used here are measured at the Mt. Hood SNOTEL site at 5,370 feet of elevation. This site is commonly used in gauging general snow pack conditions affecting the bulk of the state’s most populated areas. The latest snow pack statistics are indeed alarming when compared to last year and to the past three decades:

Currently 32”, a gain of 1” since yesterday; an overall loss of 1” in the past seven days; 96” less than this date last year; 91% below the 30-year average Snow Water Equivalent (total amount of moisture in the snow pack).

Why is the snow pack so low? A number of factors come into play, but the most important is that it has been unusually warm this year. Average temperatures in the Cascades have remained well above normal even though precipitation for the season has been about average. So, the snow is just not able to accumulate. What’s needed for heavy snowfall is a strong polar air mass colliding with heavy precipitation coming in off the Pacific Ocean. This year, there have been very few cold air pools coming down from the Arctic into the Northwest, so when the precipitation arrives, it falls as rain even in the mountains. That also tends to melt any accumulated snow on the ground.

Why is it warmer than usual this year? There has been a tendency for Pacific storms to draw their temperatures and moisture from the lower latitudes, the proverbial Pineapple Express, or atmospheric river, phenomenon. Coupled with a lack of Arctic air, the formula for snow is off-kilter. Overall, we may suspect climate change as the culprit. The Earth is indeed warming and even minor variations in temperature can produce the kind of Winter we’ve experienced in 2014-15. Previous abnormal snow pack years have generally been associated with El Niño and La Niña events which create a warming of the central and eastern tropical Pacific along with resultant higher Winter temperatures in the Northwest. However, neither type of ocean anomaly is the case this year.

Can the warm weather and low snow pack be attributed to earthquakes altering the Earth’s axis? No. The changes are simply too small. Researchers at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory calculate that the 2011 earthquake in Japan pushed the Earth’s rotational axis off more than 6.5” by slightly altering the distribution of mass across the planet. But natural shifts in the Earth’s mass in the atmosphere and oceans also cause changes of about 39” in the rotational axis every year. So, the quake-caused shifts are inconsequential compared to the regular and unnoticeable shifts that already occur naturally.

What are the impacts of a feeble snow pack? We rely on the stored moisture of the Cascades snow pack for many of our critical endeavors. Drinking water is a primary concern in some areas dependent on snowmelt to fill reservoirs. Hydropower generation can be seriously affected, especially at the dams along the Columbia River which are fed by tributaries carrying water from the mountains. Agricultural irrigation may struggle as well if water supplies are low over the Summer growing season. The result could be higher prices at the supermarket. And, fisheries are in the mix of arenas where a poor water year could be disastrous. Extremely low stream and river levels make it more difficult for all types of fish to carry out their normal lives. If those fish are anadromous, like salmon, the effects could be felt years down the road when small returns cut heavily into commercial and recreational fishing. There can be consequences for recreation in general, too. Obviously, the ski resorts are struggling this Winter; some haven’t even been able to open. Low river and reservoir levels over the Summer would impact everything from scenic beauty (like waterfalls) to swimming and boating.

Will the low snow pack make a difference during the Summer fire season? Yes and no. If the mountains are parched early in the year, yes, the chances of forest fires would increase. In the lower elevations, except for a possible lack of dousing water, the effects should be minimal. The warmer temperatures are another story. Dry and hot equals Red Flag Warnings, so though not related directly to the snow pack issue, if the weather remains unusually warm and dry, fire conditions could become explosive.

Is there a chance the Cascades snow pack will catch up this year? Well, there’s always a chance. Last Winter at this time, the snow depth increased from 80” to 128” in a single week between February 14th and 21st. So, big gains are possible late in the season. However, the caveat here is that late-season snows aren’t as helpful because they don’t pack down as much and the overall moisture content is generally lower. And, that’s where the rubber meets the road – the Snow Water Equivalent. As noted in the statistics above, even though we’re down about 60% in snow depth, the water content is 91% lower than normal, and that’s a huge difference.

 Posted by at 12:09 PM
Feb 212015
 

lincoln city chamber logo

A major fundraiser for the Lincoln City Chamber of Commerce is going on all day today, Saturday until 10pm tonight. Local businesses have donated various products and services for auction to keep the chamber financially healthy and vibrant so they can continue to improve Lincoln City’s economy and the community’s quality of life.

It’s a live auction right here on the internet. All you have to do is click on the link below and it’s just like watching live television – because it IS LIVE TELEVISION right here on the internet. So check it out by clicking on this link!

 Posted by at 10:02 AM
Feb 212015
 

Chris Burns Weather

Saturday, Feb. 21st – Lincoln County

Summary: Sun and clouds yesterday, north winds 15-20 mph, highs in the mid-50s.

Past 24 Hours High/Low…
Lincoln City: 56F/45F
Depoe Bay: 56F/38F
Newport: 54F/37F
Waldport: 53F/41F
Yachats: 56F/44F

Advisory: A Special Weather Statement has been issued by the National Weather Service for very windy and WARNING NWS SWSunusually dry conditions over Northwest Oregon. Rather strong east to northeast winds will develop tonight and continue into Monday. The winds will increase late Saturday and reach their peak late Saturday night through Sunday night, then decrease Monday.

Wind gusts will likely reach 40-50 mph and could reach 60 mph in exposed areas of the Cascades, the higher elevations of the Coast Range and the western Columbia River Gorge. Wind gusts will likely reach 30-40 mph in the Portland and Vancouver areas, on parts of the coast and the length of the Willamette Valley.

While leaves have been off trees for quite some time, and previous wind storms have felled many of the weaker trees in the area, these winds could affect power in a few areas. The winds could also make travel difficult for high profile vehicles such as trucks and for vehicles pulling trailers especially when exposed while crossing bridges.

Additionally, very dry conditions will develop as the winds quickly dry out the vegetation and negate any rains which fell over the last couple of days. The combination of gusty east winds and dry vegetation could result in rapidly spreading wildfires given a receptive fuel bed. Leaf and needle litter would be particularly susceptible, plus grasses and small shrubs that have not begun to green up from winter dormancy. Therefore, open burning of any kind is not advised until after winds decrease later on Monday. Check with your local fire agency for guidance on slash and debris burning.

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Forecast: Fortunately for the many thousands attending the Newport Seafood & Wine Festival’s biggest day, the expected strong east winds will probably hold off until the tents close this evening. Look for high temperatures of 55-60F and mostly WON PARTLY CLOUDYsunny skies today with moderate northeast winds developing. Tonight, the blow begins in earnest with easterlies ramping up to 20 mph gusting 35-40, and the mercury falling to 40F or a smidge lower. There’ll be flapping tents at the Festival tomorrow as the blustery east winds continue gusting to 30-40 mph, but it should be sunny with highs around 55F. Outlook is for the wind to fade on Monday under sunny skies, high 50-55F. Light winds and sunshine Tuesday, and then unsettled mostly cloudy weather Wednesday through Friday with varying chances of rain and temps 45-55F.

Travel: In the Coast Range today, possible icy patches and areas of fog early, then sunny and windy with 55F. Valley destinations are expecting areas fog becoming mostly sunny and a high of 55F. The Columbia River Gorge forecast calls for mostly sunny skies, moderate east winds, temps around 55F. For the Cascades, there are spots of ice on the passes this morning, temperatures are 25-30F; partly sunny, breezy, a slight chance of snow showers, the snow level is at 3,500 feet. Outlook for weekend travelers at the lower elevations is patchy fog, mostly clear and very windy with dry pavement; in the Cascades cold and extremely windy with gusts 55-60 mph, the free air freezing level is at the surface through Sunday night.

Surface Rescue

Call or email George today!

Cascades Snow Pack: Currently 32”, a gain of 1” since yesterday; an overall loss of 1” in the past seven days; 96” less than this date last year; 91% below the 30-year average Snow Water Equivalent (total amount of moisture in the snow pack). To read our Special Report: Oregon’s Dismal Snow Pack, click here.

Ski Report – New Snow/Base/Condition…
Hoodoo 0”/1”/closed
Willamette Pass 0”/0”/closed
Mt. Bachelor 0”/47”/firm packed
Mt. Hood Ski Bowl 0”/6”/tubing only
Mt. Hood Meadows 0”/30”/loose and frozen granular
Timberline 0”/46”/low snow, no night skiing

Click ad for details

Click ad for details

Marine: Winds are light easterly nearshore this morning but blowing NE 10-15 knots gusting 20 offshore and seas are WON SCAgetting a bit choppy, 5 feet at 9 seconds. As of 8:00am, Depoe Bay and Yaquina Bay bars are unrestricted. A Small Craft Advisory for winds is in effect from this afternoon through Monday morning. N winds increasing to 10-20 knots gusting 25 by late this afternoon, windwaves building to 5 feet mixed with a 5 foot swell. For tonight and tomorrow, expect NE winds 20-25 knots gusting 30 and lumpy seas 6 feet. Outlook is for the breeze to ease on Monday to 10-20 knots with swells around 5 feet. N winds on Tuesday, 5-10 knots, swells 5 feet. Wednesday, NW winds 10-15 knots with 6 foot swells and a 3 foot chop on top.

On the Beach… Sunny, becoming breezy, surf 2-4 feet (low).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
02/21 Sat 07:44 AM 0.69 L
02/21 Sat 01:51 PM 8.92 H
02/21 Sat 08:00 PM 0.05 L
02/22 Sun 02:25 AM 9.41 H

Call Craig today at 541-270-4565

Call Craig today at 541-270-4565

In Short: Mostly clear, cool nights, windy, then unsettled.

 Posted by at 8:06 AM