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Chris Burns

Oregon Coast Weather or Not….

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Feb 142018
 

The ‘Weather or Not’ Twitter feed keeps you posted on any major weather events, plus you’ll get updated travel info and an abbreviated forecast each morning tailored to the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Summary: Observations

Forecast: Lincoln City, Depoe Bay, Newport, Waldport, Yachats

Travel: ODOT TripCheck, Activity Planner, Coast Range, Cascades

Marine: Local Waters, Bar Reports

Tides: Tide Tables

The ‘Weather or Not’ Twitter feed keeps you posted on any major weather events, plus you’ll get updated travel info and an abbreviated forecast each morning tailored to the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Clean energy jobs bill discussion

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Jan 292018
 


Community Panel Discussion on the Clean Energy Jobs Bill

Learn how you can support Oregon Climate Legislation (organized by Citizen’s Climate Lobby Newport)

Facilitator:
• Representative David Gomberg
Speakers:
• Representative Ken Helm (Chair of the House Interim Committee on Energy and Environment)
• Shilpa Joshi (Renew Oregon, Coalition Director)
• John Perona (PSU, Professor of Environmental Biochemistry)
• Bill Hall (Lincoln County Commissioner)

January 30th, 2018 – 6:00-7:30PM
Newport Recreational Center
225 Avery Street, Newport

Click here for details

Hydrologic Outlook issued…

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Jan 242018
 

…FLOODING POSSIBLE THIS WEEKEND IN NORTHWEST OREGON AND SOUTHWEST WASHINGTON…

Another round of heavy rain is expected this weekend, and some rivers could rise above flood stage Saturday night or Sunday. Rivers are already running high from the rain this week, and soils are fully saturated. Rainfall amounts Friday night through Saturday night could be as high as 5 inches in the Coast Range and Cascades and 2 inches for inland valleys.

The details of where and when the heavy rain will occur, and which rivers will be most affected, will be refined through the week. Watches or warnings for specific areas or rivers will be issued if needed.

Monitor weather and river forecasts closely through the week at weather.gov/portland or mobile.weather.gov. If you live in or near a flood-prone location, this is a good time to review your action plans should flooding develop.

Tsunami Watch cancelled…

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Jan 232018
 

…THE TSUNAMI WATCH HAS BEEN CANCELLED FOR THE SOUTH WASHINGTON COAST…NORTH OREGON COAST…AND CENTRAL COAST OF OREGON…

A small tsunami was observed Alaska, but this event does not pose a threat to the coastal areas of Washington and Oregon.

Once again, the tsunami watch has ended for the coastal areas of Washington and Oregon.

This will be the final bulletin issued by the National Weather Service in Portland Oregon.

High Wind Warning issued…

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Jan 232018
 

A High Wind Warning has been issued by the National Weather Service for Central Coast beaches and headlands, in effect from 1:00pm this afternoon to 10:00pm this evening. South winds 30-40 mph with gusts to 60 mph. (Gusts to 40 mph are expected in the coastal communities.) Strong winds may blow down trees, branches, and power lines. Isolated power outages are possible. Travel may be difficult, especially for high profile vehicles. A High Wind Warning means hazardous weather conditions of strong and damaging winds are imminent or highly likely in the warning area.

High Wind Warning extended…

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Jan 202018
 

The High Wind Warning issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Coast is now in effect from 2:00am Sunday morning through 1:00pm Sunday afternoon. South winds 30-40 mph with gusts to 65 mph along beaches and headlands. Relatively lighter winds, 50 mph or so, are predicted for the coastal communities. The strongest winds are expected Sunday morning. Strong winds may blow down trees, branches, and power lines. Isolated power outages are expected. Travel may be difficult, especially for high profile vehicles. A High Wind Warning means hazardous weather conditions of strong and damaging winds are imminent or highly likely in the warning area.

Click here for more info

Weather or Not: High Wind Warning

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Jan 202018
 

Saturday, Jan. 20th – Lincoln County

Summary: Showers yesterday, continuing through the evening and overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 50F/44F/33mph/0.66”
Depoe Bay: 48F/41F/22mph/0.59”
Newport: 48F/41F/22mph/0.48”
Waldport: 50F/43F/25mph/0.33”
Yachats: 49F/44F/27mph/0.66”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: broken @ 2,500’ & 3,000’, overcast @ 7,000’
Visibility: 7 miles/Wind: SW 9 mph/Altimeter: 30.15”

The National Weather Service has upgraded the High Wind Watch to a High Wind Warning for Central Coast beaches and headlands, in effect from 2:00am to 10:00am Sunday. South winds 30-40 mph with gusts to 65 mph. The strongest winds are expected early Sunday morning. Strong winds may blow down trees, branches, and power lines. Isolated power outages are expected. Travel may be difficult, especially for high profile vehicles. A High Wind Warning means hazardous weather conditions of strong and damaging winds are imminent or highly likely in the warning area.

Forecast: Showers and breezy today, southerly winds gusting 25-30 mph, maybe a quarter inch of precipitation, and a high of 50F. Rain developing tonight, windy with gusts as high as 60 mph, low 45F. Up to three-quarters of an inch of rain tomorrow, sou’westers 30-35 mph gusting 50 in the morning, easing somewhat in the afternoon, high again about 50F. Outlook is for showers Monday, rain Tuesday and Wednesday, showers Thursday, then a chance of showers Friday. Temperatures near normal – highs 50F, lows 45F all week.

wxon-twitterThroughout the stormy season, use Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to get updated regional travel info and immediate notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings affecting the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are mostly wet, temps about 35F. Willamette Valley roads are wet, thermometer readings near 40F. The Columbia River Gorge has mixed wet/dry pavement, temperatures 35-40F, light south winds. For the Cascades, highways are snow-covered, 25-30F, the snow level is well below the passes at 2,500 feet, 1-3 inches of snow expected today, carry chains or tractions tires.

* Outlook for weekend travelers at the lower elevations is mainly wet pavement; in the Cascades, snow showers, the snow level remaining below the passes at 2,500 feet, a Winter Weather Advisory is in effect from 4:00am tomorrow morning through 6:00pm tomorrow night for up to a foot of snow.

* Get up-to-the-minute Northwest highway weather at Real-Time Roads. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck for the latest traffic conditions including delays and hazards.

Marine: Winds are SW 10-15 knots this morning with steep seas 16-17 feet at 15 seconds. A Small Craft Advisory is in effect through late tonight. A Storm Warning is then in effect from late tonight through tomorrow morning. Seas remain 16 to 19 feet early this morning, but will subside a little through the rest of the day. However, the next frontal system will move through Central Coast waters late tonight and tomorrow morning. Storm Warning remains in effect with gusts to 55 knots expected as the front moves through. This system will be a fast-mover, with winds decreasing by tomorrow afternoon. Along with winds, seas will build with the front, reaching 20 to 25 feet; dominant wave periods will be only around 12 seconds, making for rather steep seas. Winds ease late Sunday and Monday, but the next disturbance crosses the waters on Tuesday. This will bring a round of gales and seas rebuilding into the upper-teens. The general pattern remains rather active through next week, but confidence remains lower with respect to the timing of the various disturbances. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Showers, breezy, surf 8-12 feet (moderate).
* For a safe and enjoyable time on the Central Coast, the Oregon Parks & Recreation Department offers these Beach Safety Tips.
* Tides
01/20 Sat 7:57 AM 3.41 L
01/20 Sat 1:42 PM 8.23 H
01/20 Sat 8:27 PM 0.18 L
01/21 Sun 3:13 AM 7.71 H

In Short: Showers and breezy, rainy and very windy, then mainly wet and breezy.

Weather or Not: Surf to Subside, Wind to Rise

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Jan 192018
 

Friday, Jan. 19th – Lincoln County

Summary: Showers, lightning, thunder and hail yesterday, continuing overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 52F/44F/32mph/0.90”
Depoe Bay: 52F/41F/33mph/0.47”
Newport: 50F/41F/35mph/1.20”
Waldport: 53F/43F/32mph/0.88”
Yachats: 52F/44F/31mph/1.10”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: scattered @ 1,400’, broken @ 2,300’, overcast @ 3,000’
Visibility: 10 miles/Wind: SSE 11 mph/Altimeter: 29.96”

A High Surf Advisory issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Coast is in effect until 3:00pm this afternoon. Breaking waves will continue to run-up beaches much higher than normal. Waves will likely break over jetties much closer to shore than usual. Large driftwood logs can easily be carried by the high surf. Injuries or death are possible to those near or on the logs. Large ocean swells around 21 to 23 feet will continue, subsiding below 20 feet this afternoon. The threat of coastal flooding and significant beach erosion has ended.

A High Surf Advisory means that high surf will affect beaches in the advisory area, producing rip currents and localized beach erosion. It can be very dangerous to venture near the coast under high surf conditions. People at times are swept off rocks and jetties and drown while observing high surf. Stay well back from the water’s edge and be alert for the exceptionally high waves.

A High Wind Watch has been issued by the National Weather Service for Central Coast beaches and headlands, in effect from Saturday evening through Sunday morning. South winds 30-40 mph with gusts 55-65 mph. Strongest winds are expected early Sunday morning. Strong winds may blow down trees, branches, and power lines. Isolated power outages are possible.

A High Wind Watch means hazardous high wind conditions are favorable in and close to the watch area in the next 12 to 48 hours.

Forecast: So, it looks like we’ll be trading-in high surf for high winds. Showers continue today through tomorrow, producing up to another inch and a half inch of rain, sou’westers gusting 20-25 mph, high temps in the upper-40s and a low in the low-40s. Outlook is for rainy and windy Sunday, showers Monday, rain again Tuesday, then showers Wednesday and Thursday. The mercury should be near average with highs of 45-50F and lows of 40-45F during the extended period.

wxon-twitterThroughout the stormy season, use Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to get updated regional travel info and immediate notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings affecting the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are wet, temps 35-40F. Willamette Valley roads are wet, thermometer readings near 40F. The Columbia River Gorge has mixed wet/dry pavement, temperatures 35-40F, light southeast winds. For the Cascades, highways are snow-covered, 25-30F, the snow level is well below the passes at 2,500 feet, 1-4 inches of snow expected today, carry chains or tractions tires.

* Outlook for weekend travelers at the lower elevations is mainly wet pavement; in the Cascades, snow showers with several inches of snow accumulation possible on the highways through Sunday night, the snow level remaining below the passes at 2,500 feet.

* Get up-to-the-minute Northwest highway weather at Real-Time Roads. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck for the latest traffic conditions including delays and hazards.

Marine: Winds are S 10-15 knots gusting 20 this morning with seas 17-18 feet at 14 seconds. A Small Craft Advisory for winds and seas is in effect through Saturday afternoon. A Storm Watch has been posted for Saturday evening though Sunday morning. Low pressure north of the area weakens today and tonight. Another low-pressure system approaches from the northwest Saturday morning, and will bring a frontal system across Central Coast waters late Saturday night through Sunday morning. Weak high pressure arrives Monday before the next low moves near or across local waters Monday night and Tuesday. Expect seas to peak around 24 feet Sunday morning; they will be choppier this round with dominant wave periods expected to be around 12 seconds. Seas will subside to below 20 feet Sunday afternoon, and gradually subside to around 12 feet Monday night. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

Notice to Mariners… Dredging will begin January 24th lasting through January 31st in Yaquina Bay’s South Beach Marina Entrance and Access Channel. The dredge m/v Renegade and assist vessel m/v Buccaneer will be performing the work; both can be reached on VHF Channels 13, 16 and 79.

On the Beach… Showers, breezy, surf 21-23 feet (very high).
* Stay off of jetties, offshore rocks, rocky shores and sandy beaches today. These areas will be periodically inundated by surf, especially during high tide this afternoon. Be aware of sneaker waves that will be significantly higher than those that precede or follow them. Never turn your back on the ocean.
* Tides
01/19 Fri 7:16 AM 3.51 L
01/19 Fri 1:03 PM 8.60 H
01/19 Fri 7:54 PM -0.13 L
01/20 Sat 2:39 AM 7.61 H

In Short: Showers and breezy, then mainly wet and windy.

Surf warning upgraded – 50-60 foot waves possible

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Jan 182018
 

The Coastal Flood Warning issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Coast, in effect until midnight tonight, has been updated. Even higher surf is possible than originally predicted. Ocean water will rush much farther up beaches and jetties than normal. Structures and roads located immediately at beach level will be inundated by waves and damaged by debris. Many beaches, jetties, and rocky outcroppings will be covered by deep water. Several state parks have been closed as of this afternoon. Large logs can be pushed farther up beaches, resulting in damage to structures and posing a significant risk to beach-goers. Beach erosion is possible.

Offshore buoys reported significant ocean swell heights up to 36 feet this morning with a dominant wave period of 17 seconds. Significant wave heights early this afternoon were still near 30 feet. The swell will slowly subside late this afternoon through tonight, but remain above 25 feet through late evening. The swell will produce 35 to 45 foot breaking waves along the beaches through this evening. Highest potential wave heights through this evening could reach 50 to 60 feet.

The extremely large surf combined with a higher than normal tide this afternoon will likely result in flooding of low-lying areas along the coast. Locations particularly vulnerable are the Willapa Bay and vicinity, Seaside, Nehalem, Tillamook and Florence. Early this afternoon tidal flooding was noted in Nehalem.

A Coastal Flood Warning means that flooding is occurring or imminent. Coastal residents in the warned area should be alert for rising water, and take appropriate action to protect life and property. Visitors should remain off beaches and avoid narrow access areas where escape routes could be cut off by rising water. Exercise extreme caution along and near beaches.

Weather or Not: Dangerous Beaches/Thunderstorms

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Jan 182018
 

Thursday, Jan. 18th – Lincoln County

Summary: Mostly cloudy AM, rainy/windy PM yesterday; showers overnight.

Past 24 Hours High/Low/Gust/Rain…
Lincoln City: 64F/51F/54mph/0.48”
Depoe Bay: 65F/50F/43mph/0.45”
Newport: 63F/45F/51mph/0.52”
Waldport: 65F/50F/47mph/0.45”
Yachats: 63F/49F/46mph/0.52”

Newport Airport Conditions…
Ceiling: scattered @ 1,500’, broken @ 4,500’, overcast @ 5,500’
Visibility: 4 miles/Wind: S 16 mph G38/Altimeter: 29.91”

The Coastal Flood Warning issued by the National Weather Service for the Central Coast remains in effect until midnight tonight. Ocean water will rush much farther up beaches and jetties than normal. Structures and roads located immediately at beach level will likely be inundated by waves and damaged by debris. Many beaches, jetties, and rocky outcroppings will be covered by deep water. Beach erosion is possible.

* Offshore buoys reported ocean swell heights between 34 and 37 feet with a dominant wave period of 17 seconds early this morning. The swell will slowly subside today, but remain above 25 feet through this afternoon. This swell will produce 35 to 45 foot breaking waves along the beaches through tonight.

* The extremely large surf combined with a higher than normal tide this afternoon will likely result in flooding of low lying areas along the coast. Locations particularly vulnerable are Willapa Bay and vicinity, Seaside, Nehalem, Tillamook and Florence.

* High tide is forecast to be 10.0 to 11.5 feet between noon and 2:00pm today.

* A Coastal Flood Warning means that flooding is occurring or imminent. Coastal residents in the warned area should be alert for rising water, and take appropriate action to protect life and property. Visitors should remain off beaches and avoid narrow access areas where escape routes could be cut off by rising water.

Forecast: As if the dangerous surf isn’t enough to deal with, be prepared for thunderstorms today. There was already a lightning strike very close to Newport about 6:45am this morning, and more may be on the way. Otherwise, showers, southwest winds gusting 30-40 mph and a high this afternoon of 50F. Showers continue tonight, a chance of additional thunderstorms, low 45F. Tomorrow, showers, cooler, high in the upper-40s. Outlook is for showers likely Saturday, rainy and breezy Sunday, showers Monday, rain Tuesday, and showers again on Wednesday. Temperatures should be about normal for mid-January with highs near 50F and lows around 45F.

wxon-twitterThroughout the stormy season, use Weather or Not’s Twitter feed to get updated regional travel info and immediate notification of any new advisories, watches or warnings affecting the Central Coast. Just follow @chrisburnswx.

Travel: In the Coast Range this morning, highways are wet, temps 40-45F. Willamette Valley roads are wet, thermometer readings near 40F. The Columbia River Gorge has wet pavement, temperatures 45-50F, light southeast winds. For the Cascades, highways are snow-covered, 30-32F, the snow level is well below the passes at 3,500 feet, 3-6 inches of snow expected, carry chains or tractions tires. * Get up-to-the-minute Northwest highway weather at Real-Time Roads. Also, motorists should always visit ODOT’s TripCheck for the latest traffic conditions including delays and hazards.

Marine: Winds are S 20-30 knots gusting 35 this morning with huge seas 29-30 feet at 19 seconds. A Gale Warning is in effect through this afternoon. There are multiple marine hazards today as a low-pressure system remains just offshore of the British Columbia coast and a series of upper level shortwaves move over the region. Expect gales, extremely large seas, and thunderstorms. Buoy 89, which is around 90 miles offshore, peaked at 37 feet at 17 seconds around midnight last night. The seas will subside to 20-25 feet tonight, then below 20 feet by Friday afternoon. Gales should end to the south this afternoon and to the north in the evening. Small Craft Advisory winds will follow the Gales and persist through late Friday night. Another strong front is expected late in the weekend. Gales are expected Saturday night. Forecast models hint of possible storm force gusts with the frontal passage Sunday morning. Seas will likely exceed 20 feet for a brief period on Sunday. Yet another front is likely on Tuesday with more Gales and 20+ foot seas. * Full text of the latest marine forecast is available here. And, make sure you check the latest Bar Reports before venturing offshore.

On the Beach… Showers, possible thunderstorms, breezy, surf 35-45 feet (extreme).
* Stay off of jetties, offshore rocks, rocky shores and sandy beaches today. These areas will be periodically inundated by surf, especially during high tide around midday. Be aware of sneaker waves that will be significantly higher than those that precede or follow them. Never turn your back on the ocean.
* Tides
01/18 Thu 6:37 AM 3.61 L
01/18 Thu 12:27 PM 8.85 H (expect higher than predictions)
01/18 Thu 7:21 PM -0.31 L
01/19 Fri 2:06 AM 7.51 H

In Short: Showers, thunderstorms and breezy, then mainly wet and sometimes windy.